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Rationally Speaking is the bi-weekly podcast of New York City Skeptics. Join host Julia Galef and guests as they explore the borderlands between reason and nonsense, likely from unlikely, and science from pseudoscience. Any topic is fair game as long as we can bring reason to bear upon it, with both a skeptical eye and a good dose of humor! We agree with the Marquis de Condorcet, who said that in an open society we ought to devote ourselves to "the tracking down of prejudices in the hiding p ...
 
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In this podcast, Steven Le and Christie Welton discuss the five top barriers that lead to medication non-adherence, and pharmacy-related strategies for improving medication adherence. Host: Steven Le, a pharmacist and Senior Principle of Clinical Informatics with Elsevier Guest: Christie Welton, a pharmacist and Clinical Executive with Elsevier Lea…
 
In this podcast, Steven Le and Ken Stewart discuss trends impacting the growth of pharmacy and provide a glimpse into the future of pharmacy. Host: Steven Le, a pharmacist and Senior Principle of Clinical Informatics with Elsevier Guest: Ken Stewart, also a pharmacist and Clinical Executive with Elsevier Learn more on Elsevier's Website Follow on T…
 
The idea of giving poor people cash, no strings attached, is "very unappealing" for most donors, admits economist Michael Faye -- but it's still one of the best ways to help the poor. Michael and Julia discuss the philosophy behind his organization (GiveDirectly), the evidence we have so far about cash transfers as an anti-poverty intervention, and…
 
Humanity could thrive for millions of years -- unless our future is cut short by an existential catastrophe. Oxford philosopher Toby Ord explains the possible existential risks we face, including climate change, pandemics, and artificial intelligence. Toby and Julia discuss what led him to take existential risk more seriously, which risks he consid…
 
In this episode, Dr. Neha Vapiwala discusses pain management in relation to the treatment of cancer. Dr. Vapiwala covers: - How to develop a personalized therapeutic regimen for each patient - The two different types of pain, and how each can be managed - How the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the patient’s experience in pain management - How concer…
 
Ezra Klein explains how Republican and Democrats in the US became so different from each other, ideologically and demographically, and why that trend + our institutions = political gridlock. Questions covered include: Is polarization necessarily bad? Has the left polarized more than the right? And what should we make of polls that seem to show Repu…
 
Trygve Anderson, VP of Commercial Pharmacy, Elsevier and Dale Whitby, Editor in Chief for Drug Information, Elsevier, discuss how pharmacists are increasing their role at every step in the retail and virtual patient journey. Dale is a passionate pharmacist in her own right and on this podcast, she breaks down four areas of discussion: Symptom Resea…
 
Journalist Kelsey Piper (Future Perfect / Vox) discusses lessons learned from covering COVID: What has she been wrong about, and why? How much can we trust the CDC's advice? What does the evidence look like for different drugs like Fluvoxamine and Ivermectin? And should regular people really try to evaluate the evidence themselves instead of deferr…
 
Trygve Anderson, VP of Commercial Pharmacy, Elsevier, Erika Bates, Senior Principal, Informatics, and part of Elsevier’s Drug Information team and Todd Grover, Co-Founder of Glass Box Analytics & President of PharmacyFocus discuss drug pricing analytics. Bates shares some valuable drug pricing insight derived from Elsevier’s Drug Database and Grove…
 
Every time there’s an emergency, the prices of certain goods skyrocket -- like masks and hand sanitizer during COVID -- and the public gets angry about price gouging. In this episode, two economists (Raymond Niles and Amihai Glazer) make the case for why “price gouging” is actually a good thing, and Julia raises potential counterarguments.…
 
Trygve Anderson, VP of Commercial Pharmacy, Elsevier and Brad Wilson of Wilson Strategic Consulting discuss star ratings and the value of trusted knowledge. Mr. Wilson is the founder of Wilson Strategic Consulting, and Executive in Residence at Wake Forest University and CEO and CEO Emeritus of Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina. Change is co…
 
In this episode, Drs. Paul Offit and Margaret Trexler Hessen discuss what's been learned since the COVID-19 vaccine trials and the wider rollout of the vaccines. Dr. Offit is the Maurice R. Hilleman Chair of Vaccinology and Professor of Pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the Director of the V…
 
In this second half of a two-part conversation, Dr. MJ Erickson-Hogue speaks with Lizzie Pickering about what clinicians and healthcare workers can do to care for themselves and colleagues during times of grief. Lizzie is a grief investigator. She's spent the last 20 years since her son Harry died, investigating her grief and learning how to naviga…
 
When you see a statistic reported in the news, like "10% of University of California Berkeley students were homeless this year," how do you evaluate it? You shouldn't blindly accept every statistic you read. But neither should you reject everything that sounds surprising. Tim Harford, economist and author of The Data Detective: Ten Easy Rules to Ma…
 
This episode is part one of a two-part discussion about grief. Divorce, career change, loss of a child or parent, or loss of a colleague are all experiences that can lead to grief. People experience grief differently, and it can be particularly challenging for people working in healthcare. Lizzie Pickering is a grief investigator. Lizzie's work is …
 
How much do Uber and Lyft drivers really earn, after expenses? Are they getting a raw deal by being classified as 'independent contractors' instead of employees? I explore the debate over these questions with three guests: Louis Hyman (Cornell), Veena Dubal (UC Hastings College of the Law), and Harry Campbell (The Rideshare Guy).…
 
Is there any justification for seemingly unjust laws like "qualified immunity," which allows cops to get away with bad behavior? William Baude, a leading scholar of constitutional law, explores how these laws came to be and why they're so hard to change. Also, Baude makes the case for originalism, the view that judges should base their rulings on t…
 
Julia and guest Vitalik Buterin (creator of the open-source blockchain platform Ethereum) explore a wide range of topics, including: Vitalik's intellectually honest approach to leadership, why prediction markets appear to be biased in favor of Trump, whether it was rational to invest in Bitcoin ten years ago, Vitalik's defense of life extension res…
 
In this second half of the two-part episode, Dr. MJ Erickson-Hogue interviews Dr. Lori Weichenthal, MD and Dr. Jay Kaplan about the importance of wellness for medical caregivers and the effect that it has on patients. Their discussion notes the clinical areas most at risk for burnout as well as how to prevent and treat it. They also identify action…
 
Julia and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt (The Righteous Mind) discuss his moral foundations theory and argue about whether liberals should “expand their moral horizons” by learning to think like conservatives. Julia solicits Jon’s help in understanding her disagreement with philosopher Michael Sandel, in episode 247, over the morality of consen…
 
In this first half of a two-part conversation, Dr. MJ Erickson-Hogue interviews Dr. Lori Weichenthal, MD and Dr. Jay Kaplan about the importance of wellness for medical caregivers and the effect that it has on patients. Their discussion notes the clinical areas most at risk for burnout as well as how to prevent and treat it. They also identify acti…
 
Matt Yglesias talks about One Billion Americans, his book arguing that it’s in the United States’ national interest to dramatically boost its population, by expanding immigration and having more babies. Matt and Julia also discuss arguments for and against the “YIMBY” movement, which pushes for building more housing; what they’ve both learned from …
 
Rationally Speaking returns from hiatus with a look at a clash between two generations: Millennials, and their parents' generation, the Baby Boomers. Faced with stagnant wages and rising costs of education, rent, and health care, Millennials have a tougher path to economic security than Boomers did. And a growing number of millennial writers argue …
 
In this episode, Dr. Paul Offit and Dr. Margaret Trexler Hessen discuss the scientific underpinnings of vaccine development and get up to speed on the advanced COVID-19 vaccine candidates. They also speak about the realistic expectations for the COVID-19 vaccine and how hygienic measures will remain an important component of controlling the virus. …
 
The podcast, TRUE Daily Updates™ challenges the long-standing assumption that the industry needs to wait for updated drug information. Listen as Trygve Anderson and Ken Stewart discuss how to take control of your drug data update process with TRUE Daily Updates™ and ensure your clinicians and other stakeholders have access to the most current and t…
 
In this episode, Dr. Bernadette Melnyk and Dr. Julibeth Lauren share insights and strategies on how to develop resiliency during Covid-19. This discussion includes the impact on front-line clinicians as well as tools and tips for our own mental health. Dr. Melnyk is an internationally recognized nurse practitioner, author, speaker, researcher, and …
 
In this episode, Dr. Borjan and Dr. Whitby discuss a wide range of treatment options for COVID-19, and what we currently know based on available studies. Discussion includes therapies with proposed antiviral activity, use of convalescent plasma, and agents being used to address cytokine storm. They also touch on use of anticoagulants, nutritional s…
 
Trygve Anderson and Todd Grover discuss the sheer volume of drug price changes by sharing a macro view of Elsevier’s drug price analytics. Listen to the podcast and discover why drug compendia must be updated daily to remain current and understand how delays in pricing data can seriously affect IT, operational and financial performance. This episod…
 
In this episode, Trygve Anderson and Dale Whitby discuss the value of drug information during uncertain times in the podcast, Drug information on the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic. This podcast also highlights the ongoing efforts of Elsevier in providing valuable information regarding the COVID-19 pandemic to frontline stakeholders. This episo…
 
Dr. Esther Barreiro and Dr. Margaret Hessen discuss the pulmonary aspects of COVID-19 disease, such as clinical course and pathophysiology of lung involvement, noninvasive vs. mechanical ventilation based on observed phenotypes, as well as myocardial dysfunction, coagulopathy, and other issues relating to the pathophysiology and critical care of th…
 
In this second of two conversations, Dr. Don Postema and Dr. Julibeth Lauren discuss ethical issues in time of crisis and scarcity, such as triaging care and allocation of medical equipment, objective scoring criteria, recent professional society guidelines and protocols, and balancing competing priorities of individual patient rights and autonomy …
 
In this first of two conversations, Dr. Don Postema and Dr. Julibeth Lauren discuss issues arising with patients and families, including restrictions on inpatient visiting, end-of-life issues, and how patients and families can obtain support from hospital biomedical ethics teams. Don Postema, PhD is the Program Director for Medical Bioethics at Hea…
 
In this episode, Dr. Mishuris highlights the current state of EHR use to identify and track patients on the population level, advising and alerting patients, role of telemedicine, and communication between providers and hospitals. Dr. Rebecca G. Mishuris, MD is the Associate Chief Medical Information Officer, Boston Medical Center and Assistant Pro…
 
Dr. Nadworny, an expert on emergency crisis preparedness, discusses best practices and standards of care regarding isolations, triage, testing, the changing dynamic of PPE, and supporting patients, families and staff in the current crisis. Dr. Daniel Nadworny, DNP, RN, is the Director of Emergency and Patient Care Services, Beth Israel Deaconess Mi…
 
Dr. Perlman, who has studied coronaviruses for 4 decades, discusses mode of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 during asymptomatic and presymptomatic state, pathophysiology and disease progression, and touches on treatment options and vaccine development. Dr. Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD, is Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Professor of Pediatrics, Un…
 
This episode features a pair of interviews on a similar topic: First, Stephanie Lepp (host of the Reckonings podcast) discusses what she's learned from interviewing people who had a serious change of heart, or "reckoning," including a former Neo-nazi and a former sex offender. What causes a reckoning? Second, Buster Benson (author of Why Are We Yel…
 
The idea of open borders -- letting people move freely between countries, taking a job wherever they can find a job they want -- is still a pretty fringe position, politically speaking. But economist Bryan Caplan makes a compelling case for it in his new graphic nonfiction book, "Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration," illustrated by …
 
Philosopher of mind Keith Frankish is one of the leading proponents of "illusionism," the theory that argues that your subjective experience -- i.e., the "what it is like" to be you -- is a trick of the mind. It's a counterintuitive theory, but Keith makes the case for it in this episode, while explaining the other leading theories of consciousness…
 
The Stanford Prison Experiment is one of the most famous psychology experiments in history. For decades, we've been told that it proves how regular people easily turn sadistic when they are asked to role play as prison guards. But the story now appears to be mostly fraudulent. Thibault Le Texier is a researcher who dug into the Stanford archives an…
 
If you want to understand why things go wrong in business, government, education, psychology, AI, and more, you need to know Goodhart's Law: "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to become a good measure." In this episode, decision theorist David Manheim explains the dynamics behind Goodhart's Law and some potential solutions to it.…
 
Several recent books have argued there's no difference between male and female brains. Saloni Dattani, a PhD in psychiatric genetics, discusses some of the problems with the argument, and what we really know so far about gender and the brain.By NYC Skeptics
 
It's rare for public intellectuals to talk about things they've gotten wrong, but geneticist Razib Khan is an exception. He recently published list of 28 things he's changed his mind about in the last decade, not just in genetics, but in other fields of science, politics, society, and religion. Julia interviews Razib about some of the items on the …
 
It's common wisdom that spending a lot of time on your smartphone, or checking social media like Facebook and Twitter, takes a psychological toll. It makes us depressed, insecure, anxious, and isolated -- or so people say. But is there any research to back that up? Julia discusses the evidence with professor Andy Przybylski, director of research at…
 
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