show episodes
 
We often overlook Islamic history as a learning tool. The history of Islam is not only important for Muslims, but important for everyone. Islam and the people who call themselves Muslims have made an enormous impact on our world. The Islamic History Podcast is about discovering that history in a fun and interesting way.
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This podcast is dedicated to exploring issues in some more depth and untangling the complexities of the world around us. We engage thinkers, academics, and scholars in conversation on a number of themes to appreciate the ideas that make up Islam as a system of thought.Follow us on https://www.thinkingmuslim.com/And twitter @thinking_muslim https://twitter.com/thinking_muslimEmail info@thinkingmuslim.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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A podcast from The New Arab, a leading English-language website based in London covering the Middle East, North Africa, Asia, and Arab and Muslim affairs around the world, bringing you news, culture, and lifestyle from these regions and beyond. Mirroring our diverse coverage, the podcast combines storytelling and news analysis to bring our listeners something familiar yet new. Visit our website for more quality journalism: www.newarab.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more infor ...
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A Podcast on Colonial Legacy of South Asia. We talk to academics, field experts and present you with specialised knowledge on Colonial legacy in South Asia. Hosted by @omeribnhaq. We're on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @indiacolonised. Brought to you by www.ergostudios.in Read more about us and our work on www.ergostudios.in/india-colonised
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Mohammed Sadakatullah Umari did his initial studies in Jamia Darussalam, Oomerabad, Tamil Nadu. After earning Alim and Fazil, he went on to specialize in “Dawah to Non-Muslims” from the same university. He, also, holds a B.A. in Arabic from the University of Madras. Sadakatullah Umari, an active daee, regularly participates in Dawah campaigns and lectures in many places in India and abroad. He has conducted several programs for Non-Muslims on the topic “Introduction to Islam” along with Q&A ...
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Interfaith Voices provides engaging and informative discussion on the key public issues of our day through the lenses of many different faith perspectives. We foster religious tolerance and educate our listeners on the broad diversity of religious traditions and viewpoints in the United States. This podcast feed is for the hour-long version of the program.
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Historische Interviews mit Schrifttsteller:innen, Philosoph:innen, Aktivist:innen und Intellektuellen aus aller Welt. Historical interviews with writers, philosophers, activists and intellectuals from around the world. Entretiens historiques avec des écrivains, des philosophes, des activistes et des intellectuels du monde entier. مقابلات تاريخية مع كتاب وفلاسفة ونشطاء ومثقفين من جميع أنحاء العالم. مصاحبه های تاریخی با نویسندگان، فیلسوفان، فعالان و روشنفکران از سراسر جهان.
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Kabir (1440 - 1518) was a mystic poet and saint of India, whose writings have greatly influenced the Bhakti movement.The name Kabir comes from Arabic Al-Kabir which means 'The Great' - the 37th Name of God in the Qur'an.Kabir was influenced by the prevailing religious mood of his times, such as old Brahmanic Hinduism, Hindu and Buddhist Tantrism, the teachings of Nath yogis and the personal devotionalism of South India mixed with the imageless God of Islam. The influence of these various doc ...
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The Indian Ocean World Podcast seeks to educate and inform its listeners on topics concerning the relationship between humans and the environment throughout the history of the Indian Ocean World — a macro-region affected by the seasonal monsoon weather system, from China to Southeast and South Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Based out of the Indian Ocean World Centre, a research centre affiliated with McGill University’s Department of History and Classical Studies, under the direction of ...
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Kabir (1440 - 1518) was a mystic poet and saint of India, whose writings have greatly influenced the Bhakti movement.The name Kabir comes from Arabic Al-Kabir which means 'The Great' - the 37th Name of God in the Qur'an.Kabir was influenced by the prevailing religious mood of his times, such as old Brahmanic Hinduism, Hindu and Buddhist Tantrism, the teachings of Nath yogis and the personal devotionalism of South India mixed with the imageless God of Islam. The influence of these various doc ...
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You have reached Atheist Republic Voicemails. God may not be listening to you, but the citizens of the Atheist Republic are. Leave us a voicemail on AtheistRepublic.com, for a chance to have your message broadcast to our followers worldwide. Send us your, opinions, stories, advice or concerns. Together we'll build a platform for atheist voices all around the globe. Please consider supporting us by sharing the podcast with your fellow heathens or donating by going to AtheistRepublic.com and c ...
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A weekly one-hour conversation with guest experts and callers about travel, cultures, people, and the things we find around the world that give life its extra sparkle. Rick Steves is America's leading authority on travel to Europe and beyond. Host and writer of over a hundred public television travel shows and author of 30 best-selling guidebooks, Rick now brings his passion for exploring and understanding our world to public radio. Related travel information and message boards on www.rickst ...
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That Desi Spark, formerly known as The Woke Desi, is a bold podcast created by three founders who recognized a space void of color and conversation around the topics that impact dual-identity, South Asian millennials the most. From education to entertainment and social justice issues to social media trends, That Desi Spark approaches each episode with compassion, advocacy, and information, bolstered by subject-area experts and unfiltered celebrity moments. Founded by healthcare manager/autho ...
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The Young Smirks podcast invites guests to speak about current Islamic issues and affairs. Hosted by John Fontain, Young Smirks has lived as a video podcast YouTube since its launch in 2019 and now is available as an audio podcast across all major platforms. Be sure to follow us on Instagram, YouTube and all the other outlets. Like, subscribe and leave a comment and also, please support us on Patreon so we can continue the work we do to bring you these interviews with inspirational brothers.
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This Moorish Podcast was created to educate and enlighten the hearts and minds of all Moorish Nationals in the Indiana Consulate and around the world. That all Negros, Colored Folks, Black People and Ethiopians May know of their true Royal Descendant Nature as the God’s and Goddesses of this Earth Land as Moorish Americans! All praises are due to our Father God Allah and highest honors to the Seventh Angel the last Prophet in these days and time. I love you! Islam and Peace! Support this pod ...
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The Asian Review of Books is the only dedicated pan-Asian book review publication. Widely quoted, referenced, republished by leading publications in Asian and beyond and with an archive of more than two thousand book reviews, the ARB also features long-format essays by leading Asian writers and thinkers, excerpts from newly-published books and reviews of arts and culture. Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-review
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I tell stories about the East and the West that I think help both understand each other, seriously. These stories almost always connect history, culture, international relations, current affairs, and often the influences on and the interests of people who shape these stories. I wrote two books: “Egypt on the Brink” (Yale, 2010), which luckily turned out to be an international bestseller as it was published three months before Egypt’s 2011 uprising. The book tells the story of Egypt from the ...
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show series
 
Bubble tea, also known as pearl milk tea, boba or tapioca milk tea is a popular drink in Asia. Wherever there is Asian diaspora, such as in the USA, one can find bubble tea as well. Bubble tea is becoming increasingly visible even in European countries where there are relatively smaller Asian communities compared with the situation in the USA. One …
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The Dominican Republic has posted impressive economic growth rates over the past thirty years. Despite this, the generation of new, good jobs has been remarkably weak. How have ordinary and poor Dominicans worked and lived in the shadow of the country's conspicuous growth rates? Jobless Growth in the Dominican Republic: Disorganization, Precarity, …
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The Dominican Republic has posted impressive economic growth rates over the past thirty years. Despite this, the generation of new, good jobs has been remarkably weak. How have ordinary and poor Dominicans worked and lived in the shadow of the country's conspicuous growth rates? Jobless Growth in the Dominican Republic: Disorganization, Precarity, …
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Build healthy boundaries, manage difficult relationships, and live a happy life in accordance with your personal values with this unique, activity-based supplement to start or support your therapy practice. Setting boundaries can be tough—you don’t want to disappoint other people, but you also don’t want to be stuck in a situation that makes you un…
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Jake Lancaster speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his story “Grace’s Folly,” which appears in The Common’s most recent issue. Jake talks about writing stories that lean into the offbeat, uncomfortable, and sometimes grotesque parts of his characters and their lives. He also discusses his writing and revision process—carving away at long …
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Annie, Edward, and their young daughter, Rose, live in a cramped apartment. One night, without warning, they find a beautiful terrace hidden in their closet. It wasn't there before, and it seems to only appear when their friend Stephanie visits. A city dweller's dream come true! But every extra bit of space has a hidden cost, and the terrace sets o…
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Danish theologian and philosopher Søren Kierkegaard was not afraid to express his opinions. Living amid what he perceived to be a culturally lukewarm Christianity, he was often critical of his contemporary church. But that does not mean Kierkegaard rejected traditional Christian theology. Indeed, at a time when many of his contemporaries were quest…
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Nineteen months since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine and the books are coming thick and fast. Fortunately, each tells a different and compelling story. Like other recent books, Gwendolyn Sasse’s Russia's War Against Ukraine (Polity, 2023) analyses three decades of diverging Russian and Ukrainian politics and society, burgeoning Russian neo…
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In episode 5 of the CEU Press Podcast Series we sat down with Professor Gábor Klaniczay from the CEU’s Department of Medieval Studies to discuss one of CEU Press’s longest running series, Central European Medieval Texts (CEMT) and his new edited volume within this series, entitled The Sanctity of the Leaders. The CEMT series presents the best avail…
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Traci Cipriano's book The Thriving Lawyer: A Multidimensional Model of Well-Being for a Sustainable Legal Profession (Routledge, 2023) is based on an innovative model, grounded in science. This book serves as a resource for promoting well-being and culture-change in the legal community by educating about pertinent issues impacting lawyers, and how …
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For too long, our system of higher education has been defined by scarcity: scarcity in enrollment, scarcity in instruction, and scarcity in credentials. In addition to failing students professionally, this system has exacerbated social injustice and socioeconomic stratification across the globe. In The Abundant University, Michael D. Smith argues t…
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Rachel Elior's book The Unknown History of Jewish Women: On Learning and Illiteracy, On Slavery and Liberty (de Gruyter, 2023) is a comprehensive study on the history of Jewish women, which discusses their absence from the Jewish Hebrew library of the "People of the Book" and interprets their social condition in relation to their imposed ignorance …
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Christoph Burgmer im Gespräch mit Günter Grass. Christoph Burgmer in conversation with Günter Grass. Günter Grass, verstorben 2015, ist einer der bedeutensten deutschen Nachkriegsschrifteller. Sein Roman "Die Blechtrommel" gilt als Standardwerk der deutschen Nachkriegsliteratur und wurde in zahllose Sprachen übersetzt. 1999 erhielt er den Nobelprei…
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Recently, Jake the Muslim Metaphysician said on the PBD Podcast that the early church father prior to the Council of Nicaea did not teach the Trinity. Jay Dyer joins me to discuss the writings of the church fathers where we demonstrate Trinitarian theology in the early church. IP is here https://youtu.be/Gq1uYD8CzJ8…
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Sumit Chakrabarti's book Local Selfhood, Global Turns: Akshay Kumar Dutta and Public Culture in Nineteenth-Century Bengal (Cambridge UP, 2023) examines the works of Akshay Kumar Dutta (1820-1886), who can be seen as ideologically inhabiting the cusp between religion and rationalism - the two most crucial avenues of debate and discussion in the publ…
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Foreign influences on elections are widespread. Although foreign interventions around elections differ markedly-in terms of when and why they occur, and whether they are even legal-they all have enormous potential to influence citizens in the countries where elections are held. Monitors and Meddlers: How Foreign Actors Influence Local Trust in Elec…
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In August 1972, military leader and despot Idi Amin expelled Asian Ugandans from the country, professing to return control of the economy to "Ugandan citizens." Within ninety days, 50,000 Ugandans of South Asian descent were forced to leave and seek asylum elsewhere; nearly 8,000 resettled in Canada. This major migration event marked the first time…
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American culture maintained a complicated relationship with Haiti from its revolutionary beginnings onward. In Staging Haiti in Nineteenth-Century America: Revolution, Race and Popular Performance (Cambridge UP, 2022), Peter P. Reed reveals how Americans embodied and re-enacted their connections to Haiti through a wide array of performance forms. I…
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New York Times tech reporter Kashmir Hill was skeptical when she got a tip about a mysterious app called Clearview AI that claimed it could, with 99 percent accuracy, identify anyone based on just one snapshot of their face. The app could supposedly scan a face and, in just seconds, surface every detail of a person’s online life: their name, social…
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Procrastination. Writer’s block. Feeling stuck. Are you struggling with the blank page? Today’s guest shares her methods that help writers move past these blocks by turning inward to discover their own writing process, and become the writer they already are. Today’s book is Becoming the Writer You Already Are (Sage, 2022), by Dr. Michelle R. Boyd, …
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Episode 4 of the CEU Press Podcast Series introduces one of the Press’s new series, entitled Perpetrators of Organized Violence: Eastern, Central and South-Eastern Europe. The series editors, Waitman Wade Beorn, Weronika Grzebalska and Iva Vukušić talk about the aims of the series, ethical considerations when researching perpetrators of organized v…
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Between 167 and 160 BC, Judas Maccabeus and his brothers led a revolt against the Greek tyrant who desecrated the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. Miraculously victorious, the Jews rededicated the Temple in a festival of lights that became the first Hannukah. A bloody tale of oppression, war, and ancient diplomacy, these books (Maccabees 1 and 2) are a …
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American culture maintained a complicated relationship with Haiti from its revolutionary beginnings onward. In Staging Haiti in Nineteenth-Century America: Revolution, Race and Popular Performance (Cambridge UP, 2022), Peter P. Reed reveals how Americans embodied and re-enacted their connections to Haiti through a wide array of performance forms. I…
  continue reading
 
Picture, for a minute, every artwork of colonial New Zealand you can think of. Now add a chain gang. Hard-labour men guarded by other men with guns. Men moving heavy metal. Men picking at the earth. Over and over again. This was the reality of nineteenth-century New Zealand. Forced labour haunts the streets we walk today and the spaces we take for …
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"War was always central to Putin's project," writes Alex J. Bellamy in Warmonger: Vladimir Putin's Imperial Wars (Agenda, 2023). Not just the second Chechen war that made him but the NATO-probing wars in Georgia and eastern Ukraine that emboldened him, and the Western-style war from air in Syria designed to mark Russia’s return to Great Power statu…
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It’s one of the strange artifacts of history that Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania, was once controlled by the Sultanate of Oman. In 1832, then Sultan Sayyid Saïd bin Sultan al-Busaidi made the island his capital, with the empire split in two upon his death: one based in Muscat, one based in Zanzibar. As Seema Alavi notes in her history, Soverei…
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In August 1972, military leader and despot Idi Amin expelled Asian Ugandans from the country, professing to return control of the economy to "Ugandan citizens." Within ninety days, 50,000 Ugandans of South Asian descent were forced to leave and seek asylum elsewhere; nearly 8,000 resettled in Canada. This major migration event marked the first time…
  continue reading
 
Picture, for a minute, every artwork of colonial New Zealand you can think of. Now add a chain gang. Hard-labour men guarded by other men with guns. Men moving heavy metal. Men picking at the earth. Over and over again. This was the reality of nineteenth-century New Zealand. Forced labour haunts the streets we walk today and the spaces we take for …
  continue reading
 
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