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Best Japanesehistory podcasts we could find (updated May 2020)
Best Japanesehistory podcasts we could find
Updated May 2020
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Speculative fiction writer, long-term resident of Japan and Bram Stoker Award finalist Thersa Matsuura explores all that is weird from old Japan—strange superstitions, folktales, cultural oddities, and interesting language quirks. These are little treasures she digs up while doing research for her writing.
 
Join hosts Tony and Ryan as they dig into Japan “one question” (ichimon) at a time. Whether it’s Japanese pop culture, the Japanese language, Japanese history, or strange hypotheticals, Tony and Ryan go deep into whatever the topic at hand is. In the process, they also have a few laughs. Episodes are released at least once a month. If you have any Japan-related questions, send them to ichimon@japankyo.com. For full show notes, visit https://www.japankyo.com.
 
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Ushi no Koku Mairi means visiting a shrine at the hour of the ox (between 1:00 and 3:00 am). It also means going there so you can put a curse on your enemy. Deriving from the legend of Hashi Hime (The Bridge Princess) and the Noh play Kanawa (The Iron Crown), this peculiar and frightening way of cursing those who have wronged you is definitely next…
 
Alright, so this episode we continue with the Izumo theme and we are going to focus on The Great Land Master, some times called the Great Name Holder, Ohonamuchi, aka Ohonamochi, aka Ohokuninushi, aka Ashihara no Shiko'o, aka Utskushikunimitama, aka... well, you get the picture. The guy has a lot of names. Anyway, in this episode we'll go over the …
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: Have you ever had any weird experiences in Japan? Topics Discussed Weird/crazy/surprising experiences had in Japan Peculiar Japanese coworkers/teachers A teacher who wanted to go to France to become a witch Whether English is the lingua franca of witches trained in France Eating cat... not really, but kind o…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: Why are vegetables so unsulting in Japanese? On this episode we are honored to once again be joined by Kyle Broyles of the Tokyo Splosion podcast and Hard Officers YouTube channel. Topics Discussed Some funny Japanese vegetable-based insults and their (supposed) etymologies What the term daikon ashi means Wh…
 
This episode we finish the tale of Susano'o, including who he slew the giant beast, Yamata no Orochi, and thus saved Kushinada Hime, who would become his wife. We talk about how, back on earth, Susano'o plays the part of the culture hero, rather than the wild and destructive god of the Heavenly Plains. What is going on with that? And just how deep …
 
On May 5th people all across Japan celebrate Children's Day or Kodomo no Hi. It might not be a normal year, but if you look out your veranda you can possibly see some carp streamer (koi nobori). One of the ways to celebrate is with an iris bath or shoubu-yu. It's purported to make you strong like a samurai. Another way to celebrate is for boys to s…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: What's life like in Japan during the coronavirus pandemic? We also investigate the cute sneeze conspiracy that is going on in Japan. This episodes features special guest Kyle Broyles of the Tokyo Splosion podcast and Hard Officers YouTube channel. Topics Discussed What it's like living in central Tokyo durin…
 
I want to celebrate my fiftieth episode by reading my yokai story, "Sand Walls, Paper Doors" from my book A Robe of Feathers and Other Stories. This is the one that got me my book deal, my agent, and my best friend. Also, yokai, lots of yokai. I'm also going to announce a super-sekrit project Rich Pav and I have just embarked on. Hint: Horror Audio…
 
CW for mild profanity. There is trouble in the High Plain of Heaven! This episode we discuss the birth of Amaterasu, and her brother, Susanowo, and their, shall we say, rocky relationship. We cover the siblings, from Susanowo's expulsion from the earthly realm to his time in the High Plain of Heaven, where his mischief causes Amaterasu to lock hers…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: What's better: rural life or city life in Japan? Topics Discussed The pros and cons of living in rural Japan The pros and cons of living in a big city in Japan Life in Ishikawa Prefecture Life in Kobe Life in Osaka Where Ishikawa Prefecture is located Whether rural people are friendlier than city people in J…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: What is the Curse of the Colonel? Topics Discussed What the famous Curse of the Colonel is How tall and how heavy the statues of Colonel Sanders that are seen at Japanese KFC locations are How the tradition of the Dotombori Dive began The Hanshin Tigers How the Hanshin Tigers were named after the Detroit Tig…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: What is Panty Town? Topics Discussed The town of Shimogigaoka (下木ヶ丘) and its plan to use panty vending machines for publicity The history of the town of Shimogigaoka What fundoshi are How rural towns across Japan are trying to both boost tourism and attract new residents through various headline-grabbing PR …
 
An amabie is a Japanese yokai that is said to have predicted a plague and then encouraged people to share its image to protect them from that previously predicted plague. Or something like that. The amabie has recently been re-remembered all over Japanese social media with people posting their own adorable depictions of that long-haired, beak-faced…
 
CW: This episode deals with ancient Japanese stories that contain depictions of sex, misogyny, and death. The Chronicles of Japan finally get into the Japanese Chronicles! This episode starts our foray into the Japanese Chronicles: The Kojiki and the Nihon Shoki, with a look at what's behind the Chronicles and one of the first real stories: The cre…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: Was Momotarō a thief? Topics Discussed The folktale/fairy tale of Momotarō Whether Peach Boy is a good English title for Momotarō How old the story of Momotarō is Kunio Yanagita The most common motifs of the Momotarō story Some of the many variations that exist of the story of Momotarō The possible connectio…
 
On this episode of Ichimon Japan we ask: What are your Japanese studying tips? Topics Discussed How and why Tony and Ryan started studying Japanese The structure of Japanese Strategies and tips for studying Japanese and any foreign language The difficult part about learning Japanese Whether Japanese is a complex language The usefulness of talking t…
 
A kappa is a small, scrawny, aquatic yokai with a parrot-like beak, a tortoise-style shell on its back, and an indentation on the top of its head full of water. They're found in rivers, lakes, ponds, and even coastal areas. But what do they do? While recently kappa have been rebranded to be very kawaii, that hasn't always been the case. Listen to t…
 
Have you ever been sleeping and had a bout of kanashibari (sleep paralysis)? Then during that surreal -- most likely frightening -- experience, have you ever had what feels like a ghost child crawling on top of you? Or maybe late one night when you're all alone, you've heard an unseen child giggling. Perhaps you've heard tiny footsteps running acro…
 
The makura gaeshi, or pillow flipper, was thought to cause kanashibari, otherwise known as sleep paralysis. It happens when you believe you've woken up in bed, but you're actually somewhere between wakefulness and sleep. You’re aware of the room around you, but there's a subtle change in the air. You try to move, but you’re frozen. You try to call …
 
Want to increase your chances of a new year filled with health, prosperity, and an abundance of children and grandchildren? All you need to do is eat some delicious osechi ryori. Osechi is Japan's New Year's cuisine that includes such delicacies as herring wrapped in kelp and tied with gourd strings (nori maki), dried and candied anchovies (tazukur…
 
In Japan when an inanimate object reaches its 100th birthday and perhaps it was mistreated, or lost, or thrown away, it gains a soul and might possibly start playing tricks on people. This is called tsukumogami, or haunted artifacts. In this episode of Uncanny Japan, I talk about the tsukumogami and some traditional ones you could run across on a d…
 
When walking around Japan you might see a small rectangular piece of paper pasted near a front door or on a gate. On this paper is an image that can only be described as a demon or devil. While off-putting at first, this creepy little fellow isn't actually a bad guy; he's there to protect the family and household. On this episode of Uncanny Japan, …
 
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