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This isn’t a podcast for total beginners. We’re going to assume that you know what plot structure is, what a protagonist is, where ideas come from, and how to use a semicolon. This is a podcast for people who can already write okay, but want to do better.
 
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In this episode, we’re going a little outside of our comfort zone to talk about visual media: in this case, sequential art, or graphic novels, or comics. Joining us for this episode is comics artist and illustrator Wendy Xu, who made Tidesong, Mooncakes, and the upcoming The Infinity Particle. Wendy was kind enough to join us and answer some questi…
 
In this episode, we’re going a little outside of our comfort zone to talk about visual media: in this case, sequential art, or graphic novels, or comics. Joining us for this episode is comics artist and illustrator Wendy Xu, who made Tidesong, Mooncakes, and the upcoming The Infinity Particle. Wendy was kind enough to join us and answer some questi…
 
As part of this podcast’s dedication to sparking controversial, attention-getting discourse, we have a new piping hot take for you here today: libraries are good. But in this country, libraries are under attack by a small but zealous movement among the far-right. [Full Transcript Here] Links: America’s Culture Warriors Are Going After Librarians US…
 
As part of this podcast’s dedication to sparking controversial, attention-getting discourse, we have a new piping hot take for you here today: libraries are good. But in this country, libraries are under attack by a small but zealous movement among the far-right. [Full Transcript Here] Links: America’s Culture Warriors Are Going After Librarians US…
 
[Full Transcript Here] This is a writing podcast, so we talk a lot about reading. Most of the time, we’ve been discussing what we read, but today we’re going to discuss how we read and why we read. What’s the point of reading when there are other ways of getting information? Does reading make you a better person? And why are so many Americans so ba…
 
[Full Transcript Here] This is a writing podcast, so we talk a lot about reading. Most of the time, we’ve been discussing what we read, but today we’re going to discuss how we read and why we read. What’s the point of reading when there are other ways of getting information? Does reading make you a better person? And why are so many Americans so ba…
 
[Full transcript available here.] Science fiction and fantasy can imagine many things–impossible worlds, unthinkable technology, fantastic creatures, magic, gods and monsters–but for some reason, a lot of SFF authors have a hard time imagining stories about poor people. Fantasy stories often focus on royalty. Sci-fi protagonists tend to be middle o…
 
[Full transcript available here.] Science fiction and fantasy can imagine many things–impossible worlds, unthinkable technology, fantastic creatures, magic, gods and monsters–but for some reason, a lot of SFF authors have a hard time imagining stories about poor people. Fantasy stories often focus on royalty. Sci-fi protagonists tend to be middle o…
 
In part two of our discussion on diverse sci-fi and fantasy, we turn our attention to the later half of the 20th century, when the field opened up a little more to BIPOC and queer authors. This is a huge topic and we couldn’t possibly cover everyone, so here’s a list of recommended authors who we didn’t get a chance to discuss in depth in this epis…
 
In part two of our discussion on diverse sci-fi and fantasy, we turn our attention to the later half of the 20th century, when the field opened up a little more to BIPOC and queer authors. This is a huge topic and we couldn’t possibly cover everyone, so here’s a list of recommended authors who we didn’t get a chance to discuss in depth in this epis…
 
Women have always been in science fiction, ever since Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, but far too many of them have been forgotten or at least underappreciated. In this episode of Rite Gud, we are joined by Stephen Mazur, former Assistant Editor of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, to talk about the women of sci-fi’s pulp era. Books and M…
 
Women have always been in science fiction, ever since Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, but far too many of them have been forgotten or at least underappreciated. In this episode of Rite Gud, we are joined by Stephen Mazur, former Assistant Editor of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, to talk about the women of sci-fi’s pulp era. Books and M…
 
In fiction, a plot is the sequence of connected events that make up a narrative. These events aren’t random things that happen–there’s a relationship between them, usually a causative one. Generally, a plot in fiction leads up to a climax that answers a central question or resolves a central conflict. buy diflucan online buy diflucan online generic…
 
In fiction, a plot is the sequence of connected events that make up a narrative. These events aren’t random things that happen–there’s a relationship between them, usually a causative one. Generally, a plot in fiction leads up to a climax that answers a central question or resolves a central conflict. buy diflucan online buy diflucan online generic…
 
Sci-fi and fantasy are imaginative genres that can show us new, impossible worlds. Sometimes, they offer us escape from our dreary lives. But there’s one thing contemporary SFF can’t seem to escape. As Mark Fisher once said, “It’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. ” In this episode of Rite Gud, Simon McNeil joins us…
 
Sci-fi and fantasy are imaginative genres that can show us new, impossible worlds. Sometimes, they offer us escape from our dreary lives. But there’s one thing contemporary SFF can’t seem to escape. As Mark Fisher once said, “It’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. ” In this episode of Rite Gud, Simon McNeil joins us…
 
Writer, podcaster, editor, and mall explorer Kurt Schiller joins us to discuss how he started his magazine, Blood Knife. Since its inception a few short years ago, Blood Knife has become a notable voice in cultural criticism, and has been cited by NPR, the BBC, and the New York Times. In this episode, Kurt shares what it takes to launch a magazine,…
 
Writer, podcaster, editor, and mall explorer Kurt Schiller joins us to discuss how he started his magazine, Blood Knife. Since its inception a few short years ago, Blood Knife has become a notable voice in cultural criticism, and has been cited by NPR, the BBC, and the New York Times. In this episode, Kurt shares what it takes to launch a magazine,…
 
Sci-fi, fantasy, and horror have always used speculative elements to express political ideas. HG Wells wrote War of the Worlds as a reaction to British colonialism, Tolkien explored his feelings about World War I and industrialization in The Lord of the Rings, and Mary Shelley had a lot to say about gender and modernity in Frankenstein. Many specul…
 
Sci-fi, fantasy, and horror have always used speculative elements to express political ideas. HG Wells wrote War of the Worlds as a reaction to British colonialism, Tolkien explored his feelings about World War I and industrialization in The Lord of the Rings, and Mary Shelley had a lot to say about gender and modernity in Frankenstein. Many specul…
 
Writers are often under pressure to follow rules, to write to the market, to carefully fit themselves into a safe cultural and commercial niche. You have to stick to one genre, and follow the standard recipe for that genre, or else audiences will get mad and your book won’t sell. At least, that’s what publishers say. But some writers know better. I…
 
When you send a short story to a magazine, it probably doesn’t go directly to the editor. Instead, it ends up in what’s called the slush pile–the pool of unsolicited work waiting for review. Who reviews it? Weirdos like us. In this episode of Rite Gud, we’re joined by slush readers NM Whitley and Karl P to talk about why stories get rejected, retro…
 
They say the pen is mightier than the sword, but it is way easier to kill a guy with a sword than with a pen. We love art–it’s important to us and it’s meaningful and a worthwhile pursuit–but art alone does not change the material world. What, then, is the purpose of writing? Why do we do this if we’re not saving the world? Here to talk about this …
 
When a book comes out, the publisher or the author will often promote it by describing it as a list of tropes, identities, and references. “Here’s my new novel, A Groan of Stone and Bone. It has enemies to lovers, a chaotic bisexual, BIPOC representation, elemental magic, and tons of Buffy references!” It’s akin to any product listing: here are the…
 
Recently, JR of the Podhand joined us to discuss a phenomenon we’re calling squeecore—a style of quippy, fluffy, moralistic, fannish, centrist, Joss Whedon-esque speculative writing that touts itself as Important Activism but is mainly middle-of-the-road escapism. This episode unexpectedly sparked an explosion of controversy. Some people loved it, …
 
We finally reached our Patreon subscriber goal, so you know what that means! It is time to talk about Bear, Marian Engel’s 1976 Canadian novel about a mousy librarian who falls in love with a bear. The novel sparked tremendous controversy when it came out, but that didn’t stop it from winning the prestigious Governor General’s Literary Award the ye…
 
In 1936, anthropologist Ralph Linton said, “The last thing a fish would ever notice would be water.” It’s difficult to see the medium that encompasses everything around you, especially when you’ve never known anything else. Well, if fish were contemporary sci-fi/fantasy readers, the last thing they would notice is squeecore. What is squeecore? You’…
 
Bram Stoker Award-winning author John Langan joins us to talk about cosmic horror, his novel The Fisherman, upstate New York, how much money writers make (none), and how hard it is to get published when you’re a little too literary for the genre crowd but a little too genre for the literary crowd. Special appearance by Langan’s wiener dog/beagle. b…
 
We like folklore, and we like feminism. So why not combine them? A lot of writers do. Feminist retellings of old fairy tales are very popular. We have girlboss Cinderella starting her own business, rebellious Belle teaching girls to read in Beauty and the Beast, Snow White leading an army into battle. And why not? What’s wrong with updating folklor…
 
In this episode, Gretchen Felker-Martin joins us to talk about her gritty post-Apocalyptic trans novel Manhunt (spoiler free) and how an idea becomes a traditionally published book. We talk about the myth of overnight success, how much money novelists actually make (it is not much), the writing process, agents, research, and dealing with controvers…
 
Whenever a critic complains about the ubiquity or the creative emptiness of superhero narratives in contemporary pop culture, fans argue back that mass entertainment is just the modern incarnation of our rich cultural heritage: superheroes are mythology, and fandom is folklore. Is this true, or is this a way to flatten the complexities of tradition…
 
Artists have always been under pressure to create work that embodies proper morals. In the old days, if art didn’t honor the Church and glorify the state, the artist could be imprisoned, tortured and killed. Even today, pop cultural critique focuses largely on a work’s ability to impart appropriate social values: Is Black Widow feminist enough? Wha…
 
A story is a type of conversation with the reader. If you don’t leave room for the reader to speak, you’re a terrible conversationalist. This room, this essential emptiness, is called negative space. In this episode, we will discuss why the words you don’t write are just as important as the words you do. We are joined by MK Anderson. Links: QualiaR…
 
Genre is safe. Genre is comfortable. Genre tells us, as readers, what to expect. As writers, genre gives us guidelines to follow, which can make it a lot easier to plan a story: put the villain monologue here, put the meet cute there, tragically kill the protagonist’s mentor in this part of the story. But do we rely on genre conventions too much? C…
 
In today’s sci-fi/ fantasy community, it’s fashionable to dig up H.P. Lovecraft and put him on trial as the avatar of everything wrong with speculative fiction. While we won’t defend Lovecraft’s abhorrent social values, we have to ask: what is the point of this? What do we gain by canceling a man who is now a dusty skeleton mouldering in the dirt? …
 
If you’ve spent any time talking about geek culture, you’ve probably seen one word come up over and over again: gatekeeper. To be a gatekeeper is bad. To be a gatekeeper is exclusionary and harmful and discriminatory. The internet was supposed to get rid of gatekeepers and usher in a new, democratic era of content, an era free of inequality or bias…
 
What makes a writer? Is it coffee and cats? Is it a good author photo? Is it having a screenname like @JaneDoeWrites? Is it in your soul, in your bones, in your DNA? Is it collecting photos of books and sharing writing memes and penning endless posts about writing (specifically, about how much you hate it)? In this episode, Carmilla Mary Morrell jo…
 
It’s normal to look for people who share your interest in pop culture. But what happens when devotion to corporate-owned IP becomes an integral part of your identity? What happens when you only know how to be queer through fandom? The world’s greatest writer June Martin joins us to talk about how fandom has become synonymous with queerness, and why…
 
In previous episodes, our podcast has said over and over again that one of the best ways to improve your writing is to read a lot: read more books. But instead of learning from books, too many fledgling writers learn to write primarily from movies, television and video games, and their writing suffers as a result. Movies and video games can be well…
 
As the world looks grimmer and grimmer, Millennials and Gen Xers retreat deeper and deeper into childhood nostalgia. Adults dominate fandoms meant for children, like Steven Universe, Young Adult fiction, and My Little Pony. Within SFF, many writers, readers and editors have begun to treat all media as though it were meant for children: It must be d…
 
Why do we love horror so much? On the surface, it makes no sense. Why would anybody enjoy media that focuses on upsetting, grotesque topics? Why would anybody want to be afraid? In this episode, writer and ghost hunter Loren Rhoads joins us to talk about how horror helps us find beauty in darkness. Our discussion touches upon Buddhism, ghost huntin…
 
Cultural criticism has always been an essential part of our media ecosystem, especially when it comes to geek culture. And on the surface, it’s thriving. Every blog, every YouTube video essay channel, every op-ed page of every major publication pontificates on very important questions like “Is Wonder Woman a feminist icon?” “Did Thor fat-shame me?”…
 
Filthcore queen Gretchen Felker-Martin returns to talk about unlikable female characters. What makes a woman unlikable? Why are we so quick to condemn female characters for minor flaws? Why does art hate ugly people so much? Why don’t we talk about male characters’ likability? And why on Earth do we think grown-ass women need role models? Links: Gr…
 
SFF author and professional translator Mário Seabra Coelho talks to us about the art of translation. Writing translations, even only as an exercise, can open a writer’s eye to new perspectives, new devices, and new poetic turns of phrase. buy viagra generic indian pharmacy online generic We discuss all the important questions: How much should a tra…
 
Horror writer G. Emerald, who has a background in the medical system, joins us to talk about the healing power of stories that leave us with a bad taste in our mouths. Audiences like happy endings, but do we really need every story to end on a high note? Are we being pacified? Why did the Hays Code require movies to have uplifting endings? Do happy…
 
When you write a story, do you ever stop to consider who you’re telling the story to? We’re not talking about the real-life author and the real-life audience demographics. We’re talking about what’s going on within the fictional pocket universe of the story you’ve created. Who is the narrator telling the story to within the universe of the story? A…
 
When Stephen Mazur, Assistant editor at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, interviews writers, he always asks them this question: “Why do you write?” One of the most common answers is: “Because I couldn’t find the stories I wanted to read.” In this episode, filmmaker Shannon Strucci and critic Leslie Lee of Struggle Session were kind enough…
 
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