show episodes
 
Interesting Stuff: reflections on the American place with side trips into literature, art, music, culture and language.Otis Brown's Podcast is a weekly 20 minute monologue podcast often addressing current issues through the lens of personal anecdotes and American Art and Culture--think of it as a radio show you can listen to whenever you want. With free-ranging stories built around cultural figures from John Lewis to Dolores Huerta, musicians from Little Richard to Dolly Parton and painters ...
 
An exciting new podcast by Marc Eliot Stein of Literary Kicks. Why is opera relevant today? This sometimes-lost art form hides a fascinating, vibrant world. In our first episode, we discuss whether Verdi's Otello is better than Shakespeare's Othello, whether Othello had PTSD, and what it means that Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro is an Italian opera by a German Austrian and a Venetian Jew based on a French play that takes place in Spain. Welcome to the first episode of Lost Music: Exploring Lite ...
 
Product Description Twelve-year-old Benny wants a pet-a dog or a cat. You know, the kind of pet every else has. But other kids don't have his mom. She likes to do things 'differently.' So Benny doesn't know what to expect when he first opens the pet carrier. Certainly not that his neighbors will want to kick his family out of town-he just got here! And he was just about to make the baseball team, too. Will he fight for his pet or back down? Reviews (print edition) "[Not Just For Breakfast An ...
 
An early science fiction novel written by the second most translated author, French writer Jules Verne, the classic tale depicts an incredible sea expedition on board a state-of-the-art submarine. First published in 1870 and a part of the Voyages Extraordinaires series, the novel is regarded as one of the most thrilling adventure stories and one of Verne’s greatest pieces of work. Immersed in themes of exploration, avant-garde technology, and man’s insatiable desire for knowledge and scienti ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Now that the Graduation season is upon us, let's think about unlearning, let's sing the virtues of resisting training, let us move confidently now in the direction of our dreams . I don't know. In this week's podcast, I tell a story about a friend who wouldn't throw a ball for a dog and reflect on a life spent mostly on a front porch playing a guit…
 
In this week's podcast, I reflect on the early stages of what we are all hoping is the end of the pandemic and offer some thoughts on what we might become when we reach that point , as Katherine Anne Porter writes at the end of Pale Horse Pale Rider, where "there would be time for everything." Keywords: Katherine Anne Porter Pale Horse Pale Rider, …
 
Social anxiety, stage fright, glossophobia, lonesomeness, melancholia, I got 'em all. Yet, I persist. In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore the perks of not being a wallflower and tell some embarrassing stories on myself, stopping along the way to explore paintings by Edvard Munch, the writings of Soren Kierkegaar and songs by Han…
 
What is live music anymore? Does an autotuned, canned music high wire stage show even count? I don't really have an opinion on whether it does or does not, but I know for sure one performer one guitar and an audience still matters, no matter what the kids are calling it nowadays and there's still a lot of it to go around. In this week's Otis Brown …
 
Pardon the bad puns--I can't help myself. In this week's podcast, I ask why de-oculation is solely the domain of the Greeks, the Bible, Shakespeare, Rembrandt, A. B. Longstreet, Davy Crockett, Cormac McCarthy, the TV show Deadwood--oh wait, everyone is obsessed with blindness in art! In an iteration that seems Biblical, but is unique to the America…
 
This week's Otis Brown Podcast takes its title from Peter Case's great "The Open Road Song." I seem to be obsessed with singing this song lately. I've also been thinking about what constitutes "professional dress" for me and how this period of isolation may be changing that. Though I'm in a position to flout expectations of professional dress in my…
 
In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore the culture of dueling in America and add some thoughts on Hamilton and Jackson--two of America's most famous duelists. Key Words: Dueling Alexander Hamilton Andrew Jackson Mark Twain The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson William Faulkner Absalom, Absalom! Thomas McGuane The Sporting Club Lin-Manue…
 
In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore the monkeys who explored South American 40 million years ago. If we all came from the same place--however you imagine that--how did we get to where we went? The answer, of course, is that we went by boat. In Monkey Armada: I dwell in possibility, I follow Emily Dickenson, from whom I borrowed …
 
In the opening lines of Moby-Dick, Melville describes the wharves of Manhattan, where "posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries." Why do people take vacations just to stare at the empty sea? What do they see when they see the sea? In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podc…
 
Most of us have shaped objects with our hands. I want to explore how objects have shaped us through our hands. Though scientists who study haptic or tactile memory are reluctant to make assertions about touch memory and personal identity, I'm more than ready to make that leap! In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I tell the story of the first gre…
 
In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore the Thomas Cole painting "The Oxbow"(1836) and muse on its use of the signs and symbols of his life in freemasonry. Are they a secrete code? Do they get us closer to the heart of the painting? Are we all looking at the same world here? Through a reading of the painting, I hope to take us to a convers…
 
The Western is the most enduring American genre. In a perpetual state of revival, the western vanquishes all comers as the most important genre of American film. It has profoundly shaped who we are and how we are perceived as a people and I have a few thoughts on the subject. In this week's podcast, I discuss the Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly film High …
 
We all lose stuff, but where does it go? Is somebody finding it somewhere? In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I interrogate the lost and found game. Along with a reading of the Tom Waits song "Take It With Me," a Robert Earl Keen song, and novels by Frank Norris and Joseph Conrad, I offer some thoughts on what it means to possess an object. Tha…
 
In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I offer some thoughts on the work of another great Mississippi native, the saxophone genius, template for all hipsters from then until now, the king of cool, Lester Willis Young, "Prez," born in Woodville Mississippi, August 27, 1909. I explore Lester's musical relationships with Mary Lou Williams, Coun…
 
I this week's podcast, I tell the story of Marty Stuart taking inspiration from the The Dean of American Bassists, the great Milt Hinton. Marty discovered the photographs of the jazz great in the late 1970's and began his quest to do for country music what Milt was doing for jazz through his photography. Eudora Welty Milt Hinton Marty Stuart Lester…
 
Interesting Stuff: reflections on the American place with side trips into literature, art, music, culture and language. Otis Brown's Podcast is a weekly 20 minute monologue podcast often addressing current issues through the lens of personal anecdotes and American Art and Culture--think of it as a radio show you can listen to whenever you want. Wit…
 
In this week's episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I discuss my chief pedagogical goal, my life as a teacher and my method that I call, "Let's pretend we're talking about a poem." It's not all me, though. I also discuss the great HBO show Treme, the new Pixar film Soul and a Billy Collins poem. I hope these reflections on what a teacher is and does are …
 
Hobo mythology permeates 20th century American culture. While not quite as pervasive or expansive as American western mythology, the myth of the American hobo enjoys a unique position in American culture in that it continues to live and evolve. In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore some hobo writing, briefly discuss the films The Wild On…
 
I turn now to the hallowed subject, Dogs Playing Poker. Who doesn't know the painting? It it possibly the most recognizable of all American Paintings? The "painting" is actually a group of sixteen paintings, bracketed on the ends by two additional paintings, all of which were completed as advertisements for the Brown and Bigelow cigar company by a …
 
This week, I'm finally feeling emotionally ready to deal with the death of a great American poet: John Prine. As most of you probably know, we lost this enormously influential American songwriter to Covid last April, early in this ordeal. Having survived cancer at least twice, and soldiered on through all manner of adversity, John rode that old bod…
 
A discussion of Giuseppe Verdi's breakthrough opera "Nabucco" and its Biblical origin story of Nebuchadnezzar and the neo-Babylonian invasion of Jerusalem. We also talk about Boney M, the Melodians "By the Rivers of Babylon", the Broadway musical "Godspell", Herman Melville's "Moby Dick", and why some of us hate Verdi's "Aida" and "Rigoletto". Seas…
 
All right boys--you done seen the rest, now I'm gonna show you the best. In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I comment on the new Netflix film Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, staring Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman and situate it, August Wilson's play of the same name and the HBO film Bessie in a conversation about female classic blues singers of the…
 
American women, stand up and be counted! Somewhere around 1 in 100 American women have a Doctorate of some kind. Using the title lights the way for others so get off Dr. Jill Biden's back. In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I tackle the "Dr. Jill Biden controversy" and offer some thoughts on my experience with my own titles and honoraria. Thank…
 
I don't know what the Cormac McCarthy quotation has to do with the podcast, but I like it. In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I muse on bar culture and the function of the bar in American life. Keywords: e.e. cummings "I was sitting in McSorley's" (1923) John Sloan McSorley's Bar (1912), McSorley's Cats (1929) Edward Hopper Sunday, 1926 "The Ei…
 
In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I explore the African American folk tradition through versions of John Henry and reflect on what they have to say about labor. Through a reading of Mississippi John Hurt's 1928 "Spike Driver Blues," and Jacob Lawrence's Migration Series of paintings (stopping along the way with Elizabeth Cotton, Zora Neale Hur…
 
In this week's episode, I reflect on some famous American literary hoaxes--where the "hoaxer" always calls the truth a hoax--and I wonder what if anything they have to do with our current use of the term "hoax." I examine Edgar Allan Poe's "The Balloon Hoax," Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlett Letter and Ben Franklin's (as Poor Richard Saunders) pr…
 
Hey y'all, a little plug for the upcoming podcast on literary hoaxes along with a recommendation for a really interesting article on newly-discovered cave paintings in Columbia--apropos of my earlier podcast "Maybe We Could Make." https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/nov/29/sistine-chapel-of-the-ancients-rock-art-discovered-in-remote-amazon-for…
 
Happy Anniversary! I couldn't have done it without you. In this episode of Otis Brown Podcast, I celebrate six months of the podcast, express deep and sincere gratitude for the support of my listeners and, hopefully, offer a few insights into the work of culture and the way the podcast attempts to come to terms with it all. I hope you enjoy the pod…
 
With whom are you allowed to share a photograph? Who owns the image of Molotov Man? What peaches what penumbras! The conversation about consent and representation in photography is far older than Cindy Sherman photographing herself in the 1970's or academics writing about it in the 2000's and the link between surveillance and consumerism is older t…
 
In a last minute substitution, I decided to make a new podcast. Sorry for the switcho-chango, but "Who's Zoomin Whom" will be available next week (11/18). My thoughts have been with friends, colleagues and students who served in military lately so I wanted to express some of that here and on Veteran's Day. In this episode, I pay homage to some of t…
 
In this last episode before the election, I reflect on, and take comfort in, what I know about American elections in the 19th century. I offer some thoughts on why Edgar Allan Poe was calling out for Jeremiah Reynolds on his deathbed, I discuss writers and artists like Herman Melville, George Caleb Bingham, Rebecca Harding Davis, Sojourner Truth an…
 
Vicki Zunitch joins Marc Eliot Stein for a fresh in-depth examination of Puccini's great opera "La Boheme". We talk about the existential choices the characters make, the original comic stories by Henri Murger, the lifestyle of starving artists in 19th Century Paris and today, morning music at the Gate of Hell, affordable healthcare, and what the m…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login