show episodes
 
We are the Amistad Law Project, a small grassroots public interest law center and organizing project in the city of Philadelphia. We advocate for the human rights of people adversely impacted by the system, including people behind prison walls. Welcome to our monthly podcast where we’ll be lifting up the voices of our community members in the struggle for healthier and safer communities. By sharing perspectives you won’t normally hear on mainstream media platforms, we’re building our own pla ...
 
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Amplified Voices

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Amplified Voices

Amber & Jason - Criminal Legal Reform Advocates with Lived Experience

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Amplified Voices is a podcast that lifts the voices of people and families impacted by the criminal legal system. Hosts Jason and Amber speak with real people in real communities to help them step into the power of their lived experience. Together, they explore shared humanity and real solutions for positive change.
 
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Big Brains

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Big Brains

University of Chicago Podcast Network

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We tell the stories behind the pioneering research and pivotal breakthroughs reshaping our world. Produced out of The University of Chicago. Winner of CASE "Grand Gold" award in 2022, Gold award in 2021, and named Adweek's "Best Branded Podcast" in 2020.
 
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UnTextbooked

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UnTextbooked

The History Co:Lab and Pod People

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A history podcast for the future. Brought to you by teen changemakers who are looking for answers to big questions. We interview famous historians who have some of the answers. These intergenerational conversations bring the full power of history to you with the depth and vividness that most textbooks lack. Real history, to help you find answers to your big questions. UnTextbooked makes history unboring forever.
 
Righteous Convictions features music executive, philanthropist, and activist Jason Flom in conversation with a diverse who's-who of advocates at the forefront of critical issues that will impact our future. Guests include Sir Richard Branson, Ashley Judd, Senator Dick Durbin, Sister Helen Prejean, Seth Godin, Congressman James Clyburn, and many more. His discussions with these thought leaders and change-makers uncover and inspire the most powerful actions we can take for reform, equal justic ...
 
LEAD advances democracy and social justice by promoting democratic principles and leadership from an intergenerational lens. LEAD builds on the wisdom, experience, energy, and perspectives of diverse leaders and activists in the fight for America's future. The LEADing Justice podcast will tackle the most challenging issues of the day through provocative and informative discussions with singular guests who make a difference in the fight for freedom in America and the world.
 
Welcome to Policing in America – a podcast about race and policing: the good, the bad and the ugly. The goal? To have, at times, uncomfortable conversations to spark positive change. Your host is currently the Officer in Charge of a unit that creates, delivers and maintains police training in the largest urban police department on the west coast of America: Sergeant Tom Datro.
 
The State Bar of Texas Podcast is a monthly show featuring news and discussions relevant to the legal profession, from the latest industry trends and caselaw to practice tips and State Bar programs. Host Rocky Dhir, attorney and CEO of Dallas-based Atlas Legal Research, invites thought leaders and innovators to share their insight and knowledge on what matters to practitioners.
 
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Voices in Equity

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Voices in Equity

Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University

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Voices in Equity is the official podcast of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. The Cook Center is named after Samuel DuBois Cook, the first tenured Black professor at Duke University who exemplified the pursuit of social justice and equality. With research focuses including social mobility, education, health, wealth, and policy, the Cook Center aims to develop a deep understanding of the causes and consequences of inequality, and develop remedies for these dis ...
 
Go behind the numbers of mass incarceration in America, in this 4-part series hosted by CNN's Van Jones. Hear from a range of voices, as Van and his guests explore what's behind the staggering number of individuals locked in the criminal justice system, and discuss solutions to what has become a national epidemic. And for more on the criminal justice system, check out "The Redemption Project with Van Jones," on CNN and CNN.com/go, or visit www.cnn.com/redemption.
 
This is a show about Asians who didn’t become doctors, lawyers, or engineers. I’m Angie Hom, I'm Chinese-American, and I have meaningful conversations with Asian Americans who break the stereotypes. I get to talk to interesting folks who balance two different cultures while staying authentic to themselves. We talk about the small stuff like pursuing unconventional careers, culture clashes, disappointing parents, and our SAT scores. Just kidding on the scores. Wanna chat? Email me at chatting ...
 
Refreshing conversations with inspiring people. Welcome to the Begin the Begin Podcast. I'm Jeff Hilimire, a husband, father, entrepreneur, and author. I created this podcast to talk to people that inspire me, either because they've accomplished great things or done a lot of good in the world - or more likely, a combination of both. My goal is to learn people's origin stories, really dig into what makes them tick, and understand their secrets to success.
 
Atlanta WRFG 89.3 - Beyond Borders show incorporates content relevant to Native American, Latino, Caribbean and African perspectives. Beyond Borders' mission is to take a critical analysis of US Foreign Policy and its effects on the people of Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as how to address how US Foreign Policy affects people of color in the United States. BB airs every Saturday from 5-7pm EST on 89.3FM in Atlanta and streams online www.wrfg.org.
 
We amplify the voices of women change makers who are building a more equitable, sustainable and inclusive world one episode at a time. In our show, we take you on a journey across the globe to understand the solutions women are creating to impact the world. We also look at gender equality in media and how to support women social entrepreneurs.
 
Moreh and Miss Eve discuss topics relevant to Black Americans in today’s society, with reference to spirituality. It's #NationTime, folks. We've built prosperity for everyone else, and now it's our turn. This podcast is a tool for our advancement as a people. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beneath-the-surface/support
 
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The Criminal Docket

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The Criminal Docket

National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

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Welcome to NACDL's podcast series, "The Criminal Docket," hosted by Ivan J. Dominguez, NACDL's senior director of public affairs & communications. NACDL is the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and is well-known to many as "Liberty's Last Champion." Each episode of "The Criminal Docket" explores important items on the criminal justice agenda, in-depth, with top leaders in the legal practice, public policy, journalism, academia, and others whose lives intersect with the crimina ...
 
At the foundational floor of my core oracle is truth. I have lived to learn only by way of truth do I truly live. Sharing the learned truths of life, I attempt to help us all...all my sisters, all my brothers. My need to help arose after watching my mother try to survive as a homeless mentally incapacitated bag lady on the streets of Baltimore city for over a decade. I try...I try to share, I try to be authentic, and I try to help everyone without imposing assumptions, judgments, or blame up ...
 
Justice in America, hosted by Josie Duffy Rice and Clint Smith, is a podcast for everyone interested in criminal justice reform— from those new to the system to experts who want to know more. Each episode we cover a new criminal justice issue. We explain how it works and look at its impact on people, particularly poor people and people of color. We’ll also interview activists, practitioners, experts, journalists, organizers, and others, to learn. By the end of the episode, you’ll walk away w ...
 
Roundtable with Stephanie Robinson is a weekly 30-minute talk-radio program focused on culture, politics and relationships, hosted by dynamic and popular radio personality, Stephanie Robinson. Each week, Stephanie takes on a hot and timely topic to engage her listeners in provocative and action-focused conversations. Robinson’s Roundtable with featured contributors, town hall-style exchanges, Fresh Copy News segments, and piercing analysis all make for lively discussion and debate. Roundtabl ...
 
Listen to all of the PBS NewsHour's coverage of U.S. politics, from Yamiche Alcindor's reports from the White House, to Lisa Desjardins on Capitol Hill, to our weekly analysis and discussions from David Brooks, Mark Shields, Amy Walter and Tamara Keith. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
 
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The LEADing Justice podcast is honored to welcome Terrica Redfield Ganzy, Executive Director, Southern Center for Human Rights. The Southern Center fights for a world free from mass incarceration, the death penalty, the criminalization of poverty, and racial injustice. A passionate, indefatigable leader with many years of dedicated service, she sta…
 
More American residents are behind bars than any other nation. While the U.S. Criminal Justice System was established to regulate peace and order, it has since become the catalyst for criminalizing of people of color. Fueled by initiatives like Nixon’s “War on Drugs” campaign, which unfairly targeted communities of color, mass incarceration has ste…
 
Today we’re focused on Chapter 4 of The Pandemic Divide: COVID-19, Race, and Mass Incarceration, written by our guest today, Arvind Krishnamurthy. We discuss the differences between jails and prisons, the alarming statistics on COVID among the incarcerated population (including employees), the difficulty of finding accurate data, why politicians ar…
 
On this episode of WSEG, we do a deep dive into the conspiracy theory that Gangster rap is a way to encourage criminal behavior that leads to mass incarceration. But the story doesn't stop there! We look into the proprietors of The Record companies, the private prisons, and the companies that profit off prison slave labor. We connect the dots that …
 
The United States imprisons a higher proportion of its population than any other nation. Mass Incarceration Nation offers a novel, in-the-trenches perspective to explain the factors - historical, political, and institutional - that led to the current system of mass imprisonment. Jeffrey Bellin's book Mass Incarceration Nation: How the United States…
 
Elizabeth Franklen-Best, a 20-year attorney, has been reversing criminal convictions for 15-plus years. We discuss a component on the Criminal Justice system that does not get as much attention as policing; criminal sentencing. Elizabeth is a pragmatic, intelligent, attorney who values public safety. She also fights for those who many have written …
 
More than a year after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, journalist Maria Ressa still faces a series of criminal charges in her native country of the Philippines. She spent much of her time reporting on former President Rodrigo Duterte's regime and the war on drugs. Ressa sat down with Judy Woodruff and discussed her book, "How to Stand Up to a …
 
The 2022 midterms saw the greatest number of Muslim Americans elected to office. According to a report from Jetpac Resource Center and the Council on American-Islamic Relations, 153 Muslim Americans ran for office across all levels of government. Ruwa Roman was recently elected to the Georgia House of Representatives and joined Geoff Bennett to dis…
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the Democrats' plan to shakeup the road to the White House, President Biden and Congress halt a potential railroad strike and lawmakers shield gay marriage. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https:/…
 
A new report out this week says a data breach at the California Department of Justice last summer was the result of poor training and a lack of professional rigor at the agency. The leak included the personal information of hundreds of thousands of concealed carry firearm license applicants. Reporter: Ben Christopher, CalMatters Award-winning poet …
 
On this Episode of WSEG, we cover music news. We Talk about the latest allegations against R&B singer Trey Songz and his past accusations. Also, Metallica has a new album and tour coming out, so, we make fun of their doc, "Some Kind Of Monster". Find the video version HERE:Metallica:https://youtu.be/oL_7VLgcL6sTrey Songz:https://youtu.be/OfqDdu1sfD…
 
In our news wrap Thursday, a bill to prevent a railroad strike is headed to President Biden after it passed the Senate, but Senators rejected a separate measure to grant seven days of paid sick leave to workers, the Supreme Court will rule if the Biden administration's plan for student debt forgiveness is constitutional and more cities in China loo…
 
Former Vice President Mike Pence has said he's considering running for president in 2024, but he's been notably quiet about the events of January 6, saving his take for his newly released book, "So Help Me God." Pence sat down with Judy Woodruff to talk about the book, his last conversation with former President Trump and why he supported legal cha…
 
Georgia's runoff election for a U.S. Senate seat has broken records for the most people voting early on a single day. In total, more than one million people have already cast their ballots in the race between incumbent Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican challenger Herschel Walker. Laura Barrón-López has been on the campaign trail wit…
 
Even though bankruptcy touches so many areas of the law, many attorneys outside bankruptcy practice lack an adequate understanding of how it all works. Rocky Dhir brings on experts Catherine Curtis and Robert Vanhemelrijck to get an overview of what all lawyers should know about this area of legal practice. They discuss different types of bankruptc…
 
The University of California has reached a tentative agreement with postdoctoral scholars and academic researchers to increase their pay and other benefits. Those UC workers are staying on the picket lines in solidarity with their United Auto Worker union members who still have not reached a deal. Reporter: Laura Fitzgerald, KQED Tani Cantil-Sakauy…
 
Technology plays a vital role in our society day-to-day, but what exactly is our role when it comes to managing our tech? How do our internal biases impact the products we create? Can technological advances actually be “neutral” as a product of human imagination? These are all questions to consider as we take a look at how human and computational i…
 
In our news wrap Wednesday, House Democrats elected New York Representative Hakeem Jeffries as their new leader making him the first Black lawmaker to head a major political party in Congress, the Islamic State group says its latest leader has died in a battle and President Biden pledged $135 million to relocate Native American villages affected by…
 
Congress moved swiftly to head off a nationwide railroad strike. The U.S. House of Representatives voted to impose a compromise settlement on freight railroads and a dozen labor unions and approved more paid sick leave for rail workers. The measures now head to the Senate. Lisa Desjardins reports on some of the key issues in the dispute. PBS NewsHo…
 
LGBTQ people are incarcerated at a rate three times higher than the general population. But when they are released from prison, experts say many reentry programs fail to meet their unique needs. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports for our series, Searching for Justice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Postdoctoral scholars and academic researchers in the University of California system have reached a tentative five-year deal. But the strike continues, as two groups — graduate student researchers and academic student employees — still have not come to an agreement. New reporting from CalMatters finds that Cal Poly San Luis Obispo enrolls the smal…
 
On this episode of WSEG, wwe cover music news! We talk about YE calling out celebrities for not denouncing balenciaga, Ye Wanting Elon Musk to let Alex Jones Back On Twitter and If Elon is Lex Luthor?Find Thee Video Version HERE:https://youtu.be/0boVNPX0SRgFind Reina Mystique: https://www.reinamystique.com/Find The Moon:https://songwhip.com/reinamy…
 
Whose fault are financial crises, and who is responsible for stopping them, or repairing the damage? Impunity and Capitalism: The Afterlives of European Financial Crises, 1690-1830 (Cambridge University Press, 2022) develops a new approach to the history of capitalism and inequality by using the concept of impunity to show how financial crises stop…
 
Digital platforms controlled by Alibaba, Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook, Netflix, Tencent and Uber have transformed not only the ways we do business, but also the very nature of people's everyday lives. It is of vital importance that we understand the economic principles governing how these platforms operate. Paul Belleflamme and Martin Peitz's book Th…
 
Today we’re talking about chapter 11 of The Pandemic Divide, The Rebirth of K-12 Public Education: Postpandemic Opportunities, written by Kristen Stephens, Kisha Daniels, and Erica Phillips. We have all of the authors of this chapter on this episode, and we’re also joined by Sashir Moore Sloan, Social Studies teacher at Durham Public Schools. When …
 
Back from the Thanksgiving holiday, the Democratic-controlled Congress is up against a ticking clock. There are now just five weeks until Republicans take over the majority in the House of Representatives. There's a long list of priorities lawmakers are trying to pass before the end of the year. Congressional Correspondent Lisa Desjardins reports. …
 
A federal jury convicted the founder of the Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, of seditious conspiracy in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Mary McCord, director of the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, monitored the trial in Washington and joined Judy Woodruff to discuss the verdict. PBS NewsHour is supported by - ht…
 
In our news wrap Tuesday, universities in Beijing and other Chinese cities sent students home after weekend protests against COVID restrictions and the country's leaders, a new Pentagon report estimates China is rapidly building its nuclear arsenal and closing the gap with the U.S. and the city of Houston, Texas lifted a boil-water notice for more …
 
The Supreme Court is weighing border security and the extent to which states can challenge federal policy. Texas and Louisiana are contesting the Biden administration's guidelines on who should be prioritized for deportation. Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal and Theresa Cardinal Brown of the Bipartisan Policy Center joined John Yang to disc…
 
Arizona has been a hotbed for election denialism since 2020, and misinformation is now disrupting what is typically a routine election procedure. One of the state's 15 counties failed to meet Monday's deadline to certify this year's midterm election results and Kari Lake, who lost the election for governor, filed a lawsuit against Maricopa County. …
 
In late September, passenger rail service from San Diego to places north of San Clemente halted. An unstable slope above the track in San Clemente posed the threat of a landslide. Bluff stabilization is ongoing, but rail service is expected to resume next month. Reporter: Thomas Fudge, KPBS After wildfire season ends in the Western U.S., those who …
 
This episode, we’re talking to people who have lost loved ones to homicide about those experiences and what happened afterwards, both immediately and over a longer period of time. There’s a lot of pain and grief here. For every person who is murdered, there is a family, a friend group, a community who feel that loss. The numbers – over 500 people m…
 
Michael Bess is the Chancellor's Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. His fifth and most recent book is Planet in Peril: Humanity’s Four Greatest Challenges and How We Can Overcome Them, published by Cambridge University Press in 2022. This study focuses on the existential risks posed by climate change, nuclear weapons, pandemics (natural…
 
The largest protests in more than 30 years rocked China as tens of thousands of demonstrators across the country filled the streets to denounce Beijing's zero-COVID quarantine and testing policies. But some of the demonstrations quickly evolved into demands for political change, including the removal of President Xi. Nick Schifrin spoke with long-t…
 
In our news wrap Monday, a white teenager pleaded guilty to killing ten Black shoppers and workers at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, unrest in China sent a shudder down Wall Street as major stock indexes dropped, Ukraine is warning of another hard week with more Russian missile strikes against power and water systems and Mauna Loa in Hawaii is…
 
One week after former President Donald Trump announced he would seek reelection, he dined at his Mar-a-Lago home with two men known for their racist and antisemitic beliefs: Nick Fuentes and Ye. Mary McCord of the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection and Stuart Stevens of the Lincoln Project joined Laura Barrón-López to discuss what…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the GOP's future after Trump's dinner with Nick Fuentes and Ye and lawmakers return to Washington for the lame-duck session. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
During labor disputes, employers sometimes freeze health insurance benefits for workers. But a law to take effect next summer will provide striking private-sector workers with fully subsidized coverage. Reporter: Stephanie O’Neill, Kaiser Health News New reporting shows that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation moves prisoner…
 
In our news wrap Sunday, Dr. Anthony Fauci called attention to two new subvariants of COVID-19 that now represent more than half of all U.S. cases, protestors in Shanghai clashed with police over China's restrictive COVID lockdowns, intense Russian shelling continues in Ukraine as residents evacuate Kherson, and the U.S. soccer federation took a br…
 
n our news wrap Friday, two days of missiles attacks in Kherson killed at least 11 people two weeks after Russians from the city in southern Ukraine, the death toll in Indonesia hit 310 after an earthquake struck western Java earlier this week and police say the gunman who killed six coworkers at a Virginia Walmart left a "death note" on his phone …
 
Two of the nation's largest grocers are looking to become one, new supermarket giant. Kroger wants to buy Albertsons in a nearly $25 billion deal to compete with retailers like Walmart, the top U.S. grocery seller, and Amazon, which is expanding its food operations. Sam Silverstein of Grocery Dive joined John Yang to discuss the merger and what it …
 
There is a national shortage of Adderall, a drug used to treat several attention-deficit disorders. Intermittent manufacturing delays and a lack of supply to meet market demand in the U.S. left those who rely on the drug unsure about how they'll be able to get the medication they say they need to function. Dr. Craig Surman joined William Brangham t…
 
The chemical mercury is considered so dangerous to humans and the environment that more than 100 countries have agreed to try to end its use. But across the world, millions of miners are still exposed to the toxic metal. In Zimbabwe, a majority of miners depend on it to help them extract gold. Nick Schifrin reports in collaboration with the Global …
 
New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join William Brangham to discuss the week in politics, including recent mass shootings in America and what can be done during the lame-duck session of Congress. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
As the U.S. and other nations try to end the Russian war in Ukraine, there has been a renewed focus on Russian President Putin. Who is he, where did he come from and what does he want? Andrew Weiss tries to answer those questions in his new graphic novel with art by Brian Box Brown called, "Accidental Czar: The Life and Lies of Vladimir Putin." Wei…
 
Just like animals, the world’s trees, flowers, grasses and succulents are under threat, especially as our world heats up because of climate change. About a third of California’s native plant species and populations are now endangered or threatened by development, drought, competition from invasive species and of course wildfires. In California, bot…
 
On this episode of WSEG, we cover music news. We talk abou Ice Cube turning down a $9mil dollar role because he refused to take the Jab. Also, Ye West his candidacy for the 2024 presidential election.Find thee video versions HERE:Cubehttps://youtu.be/8qwwVZ3MpCMYe 2024https://youtu.be/zH9h5Ko30ZsFind Reina Mystique: https://www.reinamystique.com/Fi…
 
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