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From long-lost Viking ships to kings buried in unexpected places; from murders and power politics, to myths, religion, the lives of ordinary people: Gone Medieval is History Hit’s podcast dedicated to the middle ages, in Europe and far beyond. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
 
I'm Cullen Burke, and this is Cauldron - A Military History Podcast. I'll cover the significant battles in history, breaking down the vital players, weapons, methods, events, and outcomes. Let’s take a peek into the past and see what, if anything, can be learned from the most dramatic moments in our collective story. Let’s get stuck in!
 
Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft offers a deep dive into the most fascinating stories from the history of all things magical. Produced and hosted by a history professor, episodes of Enchanted feature atmospheric music, dramatic performances by a variety of voice actors, in-depth historical research and analysis, and a deep connection to the people and events that shaped the past. New episodes on the first Friday of every month.
 
Mythgard Academy aims to make engaging discussions of fantasy and science fiction literature free and open to everyone. The Mythgard Academy program features live discussions with Dr. Corey Olsen, The Tolkien Professor, and other experts on speculative fiction. Books are nominated and voted on by our supporters, and recordings are available for free via podcast and the Signum University YouTube channel.
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
A podcast about the Fathers of the Church—the foundational figures in Christian history. Hosted by popular Patristics author Mike Aquilina. Season 1 covers all the Fathers in chronological order. Season 2 covers the Ecumenical Councils. Episodes without season number are miscellaneous topics. A production of CatholicCulture.org.
 
Renaissance England was a bustling and exciting place...new religion! break with rome! wars with Scotland! And France! And Spain! The birth of the modern world! In this twice-monthly podcast I'll explore one aspect of life in 16th century England that will give you a deeper understanding of this most exciting time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
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Noble Blood

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Noble Blood

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Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood.
 
RedHanded the podcast jumps head first into all manner of macabre madness. We cover everything from big time serial killers (and those you may never have heard of), to hauntings, possessions, disturbing mysteries, bizarre whodunits and basically anything that tickles our creepy fancy. So, join us, plug in, sit back and prepare for scares.
 
In Viking times, a ‘Thing’ was a gathering; a place where leaders and warriors could meet and talk. In the 21st century, our ‘Thing’ is a virtual place where history academics and enthusiasts from around the world can come together to share knowledge. Join Miranda and Lucas, from the JORVIK Viking Centre, as they delve into another fascinating topic about Vikings, archaeology, and more!
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is. New episodes come out Thursdays for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers. Listen ad-free on Wondery+ or ...
 
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show series
 
Beginning in the twelfth century, Jewish moneylenders increasingly found themselves in the crosshairs of European authorities, who denounced the evils of usury as they expelled Jews from their lands. Yet Jews were not alone in supplying coin and credit to needy borrowers. Across much of Western Europe, foreign Christians likewise engaged in profess…
 
Edward III wed Philippa of Hainault when they were both teenagers. It was a marriage of deep affection lasting 41 years. But when Alice Perrers entered court as a young widow, she caught the eye of the ageing king as Philippa’s health declined. In this episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis talks to Gemma Hollmann, author of The Queen and the Mistres…
 
In the Middle Ages, swans could be found everywhere from ponds, lakes, and moats, to shields, tombs, and stories. This week, Danièle speaks with Natalie Goodison about how these beautiful birds have made a lasting impact on Western culture in wide-ranging and unexpected ways. You can support this podcast and Medievalists.net on Patreon - go to http…
 
The final episode of the Medieval Grad Podcast. Lucie Laumonier talks with Peter Konieczny about the experience of doing a podcast, what their favourite episodes were, and what Lucie is doing now. On behalf of Lucie, we at Medievalists.net want to thank you for listening to this podcast and supporting our work. You can find Lucie's articles on Medi…
 
Grettir, his little brother, and their reluctant helper face a new threat on Drangey. His story comes to a conclusion but not his saga. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: Grettir's Saga, trans…
 
Medieval torture, the very words probably fill you with equal parts fear and curiosity…and that’s because no period of human history were the methods employed more devious, imaginative, and downright excruciating than in Medieval times. Join H&S as they take you through five of the most brutal ways countless poor souls met their end in Medieval Eur…
 
Hello and welcome to Medieval Murder, the podcast that brings all things gruesome and historical to the comfort of your own home or car or wherever it is you’re listening from. My name is Hannah Purtymun and I’m here with my father Kevin Purtymun to discuss some of the most famous and infamous murders that took place in the Medieval and Early Moder…
 
Join Sarah and fellow medieval historian Abbey Agresta as we tackle 2022 release Catherine Called Birdy! We talk about our own history with the book as young wannabe medievalists, menageries for exotic animals, the 1290 expulsion of the Jews from England, and medieval European marriage practices. Spoiler alert: we're ... not that into Lena Dunham's…
 
If you feel unwell today you can pick up a prescription or head to a medical centre, but how did ill people treat their ailments in the Middle Ages? A major new project at Cambridge University Library aims to find out, by digitising, cataloguing and conserving over 180 medieval manuscripts, containing well over 8,000 medical recipes. Dr James Freem…
 
The palaeolithic period stretches across a vast period of space and time, but if there’s one thing that really brings the prehistoric era to life for us today, it’s cave art. Professor Paul Pettitt answers your top questions on what we can learn from the extraordinary prehistoric paintings and engravings found at places like Lascaux and Altamira. S…
 
Helena Bonham Carter tells us about playing Noele Gordon, "the Queen of the midlands", in new ITV drama 'Nolly' written by Russell T Davies. The actress starred in the hugely popular TV soap Crossroads for 18 years until she was sacked very suddenly in 1981. The TV drama Happy Valley has captured the public’s imagination with the final episode of t…
 
How Grief Rewires The Brain Being a human can be a wonderful thing. We’re social creatures, craving strong bonds with family and friends. Those relationships can be the most rewarding parts of life. But having strong relationships also means the possibility of experiencing loss. Grief is one of the hardest things people go through in life. Those wh…
 
Wind And Solar Were Europe’s Top Energy Sources In 2022 The European Union reached a major renewable energy milestone in 2022. For the first time, wind and solar generated more energy in the European Union than any other power source. Ira talks with science writer Roxanne Khamsi about Europe’s energy future and other top science stories of the week…
 
Today we cover what we can in terms of Mayan political history. The Maya organized themselves into essentially what we might call city-states. These centered around some locations you might recognize like Chichen Itza and Tikal, and many more you will not recognize. Sadly, much of Mayan history is lost to us as much of the written record did not su…
 
You hear the name ‘Alexander Graham Bell,’ and you think ‘inventor of the telephone.’ But he devoted much of his life to the ‘education’ of deaf people. Bell’s fraught legacy with the deaf community is explored in Veronica Simmonds' documentary, Unsound: The Legacy of Alexander Graham Bell. *This episode originally aired on May 10, 2021.…
 
A new report by HM Inspectorate of Prisons on conditions at Eastwood Park women’s prison has been released today. We speak to Sandra Fieldhouse, lead for women’s prisons at HMI Prisons about the findings. The TV drama Happy Valley has captured the public’s imagination with the final episode of the final series airing this Sunday. Catherine Cawood p…
 
Curtis Runstedler's book Alchemy and Exemplary Poetry in Middle English Literature (Palgrave Macmillan, 2023) explores the different functions and metaphorical concepts of alchemy in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Middle English poetry and bridges them together with the exempla tradition in late medieval English literature. Such poetic narrative…
 
In the era of Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers, the real-life Cardinal Richelieu must solve a bizarre mystery: the demonic possessions of the Ursuline nuns of Loudun, who have accused the parish priest of sorcery. In this episode, we explore the trial of Urbain Grandier and the possessions at Loudun. What happens when desire becomes obsession?…
 
The annual JORVIK Viking Festival will be returning to the streets on York from 11th-19th February 2023 alongside That JORVIK Viking Thing - a series of online livestreams and on demand digital content for Viking fans around the world to enjoy. In this minisode Miranda and Lucas chat about some of the events that will be taking place during the Fes…
 
What would have happened if Josef Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D Roosevelt had all been assassinated at the height of World War Two? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Brad Meltzer and Josh Mensch discuss the complex tale of a little-known Nazi plot to kill the ‘Big Three’ during the 1943 summit in Tehran – regarded by some as a close call that …
 
Luke and Eleanor are back to celebrate the 100th episode of We're Not So Different with a mailbag episode featuring many listener questions. we cover background info on the show, questions about the British crown, Luke's hyperfixations, and more! enjoy and thanks for 100 episodes! Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Ou…
 
Women are able to recall details of sexual assault and rape with accuracy, even if they have drunk – moderate amounts of alcohol .A study conducted at the University of Birmingham demonstrated that women who had drunk alcohol up to the legal limit for driving were able to recall details of an assault in a hypothetical scenario, including details of…
 
The pandemic has made us all rethink how we work. Where once millions of people used to travel into work in tall glass buildings in big cities every day, now our idea of the office has come to include the kitchen table or maybe even a coffee shop. Yet despite the temptation to shift permanently to remote working, many organisations say the events o…
 
The Iron Age Mediterranean's new density of connections between people and places was about more than the economy and trade; it also remade the culture of the whole region, bringing new ideas and practices - such as wine-drinking and the alphabet - across its entire expanse. Professor Tamar Hodos is one of the world's leading experts on the Iron Ag…
 
The much-told legend of Rasputin – the giant, wild-eyed, well-hung, wandering Siberian monk who seduced the Tsarina herself – is mostly a bunch of absolute borscht. But the real story is just as wild. H&S look at the life of a peasant who infiltrated Russian nobility, embodying the tensions of a nation – a charismatic zealot who mysteriously healed…
 
This week the government published a major environmental improvement plan for England. It has pledged that every household will be within a 15-minute walk of green space or water, the restoration of 1.2m acres of wildlife habitat, and that sewage spills will be tackled with upgrades to wastewater treatment works. Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guar…
 
Common land – land which wasn’t settled or farmed – used to exist right across Britain, and provided a vital shared resource for local communities. However, it was also seen by some as a wild place for wild people, and over the centuries, was gradually ‘improved’ or enclosed. Speaking with David Musgrove, Professor Angus Winchester highlights commo…
 
Helena Bonham Carter is one of our best known actors – she’s played everyone from Princess Margaret in The Crown and Elizabeth the Queen Mother in The King's Speech, to Bellatrix Lestrange in the Harry Potter films, and more recently Enola Holmes’ formidable mother in the Netflix films with Milly Bobby Brown. Helena is now taking on a very differen…
 
In this panoramic and multifaceted book, Meir Bar-Asher examines how Jews and Judaism are depicted in the Qur'an and later Islamic literature, providing needed context to those passages critical of Jews that are most often invoked to divide Muslims and Jews or to promote Islamophobia. He traces the Qur'anic origins of the protection of Jews and oth…
 
In Welsh history, the period that lies between the medieval era of resistance to English occupation, and the rapid industrialisation of the 18th and 19th centuries, is often forgotten. Yet, there was much more going on in Wales in the early modern period than might initially meet the eye. Speaking with Elinor Evans, Lloyd Bowen describes the ambigu…
 
In this episode we talk to the authors of two new books on Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the Latin epic poem he wrote in 8 CE. Stephanie McCarter has published a new translation of the poem, and Gareth Williams has written a short interpretive introductory work on the epic to go with the Columbia Core Curriculum. We talked with both of them about the way O…
 
Actor and comedian, Emily Atack has decided to stand up against the men who cyber-flash her daily. Having received unsolicited, unwanted, abusive messages, dick pics and crude images for years she has made a documentary “Emily Atack: Asking for it?” for BBC 2. Emily joins Nuala to discuss why men do this and why she's chosen to speak about it publi…
 
Nicole Archambeau, associate professor of history at Colorado State University, talks about her book, Souls under Siege: Stories of War, Plague, and Confession in Fourteenth-Century Provence (Cornell University Press), with Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel. The book explores how the inhabitants of southern France made sense of the ravages of succe…
 
In the summer of 1346, English soldiers landed at Normandy and mounted a campaign that would become one of the most famous in the Hundred Years War. Historian Dan Jones joins the podcast again to talk about Edward III, the Black Prince, and his new novel, ESSEX DOGS. JOIN THE PILGRIMAGE TO CORNWALL! Support Noble Blood: — Bonus episodes, stickers, …
 
Between 1828 and 1997, over 150,000 indigenous Canadian children were forcibly taken from their families, and placed in church-run ‘residential schools’. Their heads were shaved, they were forbidden from speaking their native languages, and their cultures were forcibly and violently suppressed. This is the story of one of the darkest chapters in Ca…
 
This week star gazers will be hoping to catch sight of an exotic green comet that last passed by Earth 50,000 years ago. But, unlike the view our Neanderthal ancestors would have had, light pollution will make witnessing this celestial event an impossibility for many. Ian Sample speaks to astronomy journalist Dr Stuart Clark about how best to see t…
 
In this episode, Carolyn and Sarah follow Karen from the height of her fame through her struggle to find independence, her attempts at eating disorder recovery, and finally to her death on February 4, 1983, when she was just 32 years old. Then it's time to sing a song. We extensively discuss eating disorders, disordered eating, and everything that …
 
During the Second World War, six talented mathematicians were brought together to make history. These women had one mission: to program the world’s first and only supercomputer. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, Kathy Kleiman explores the vital but overlooked role the “Eniac 6” played in the history of computing during and after the Second World War. (…
 
Hilary Grime’s daughter Phoebe, a student at Newcastle university, took her own life in June 2021. Hilary has since come together with other bereaved families to form the Learn Network with the aim of preventing future deaths of students by suicide. One of their first targets is to ask the government to legislate for a statutory duty of care for st…
 
Throughout history, people have got tattooed for a huge range of reasons, whether religious devotion, artistic expression, or to demonstrate cultural belonging – or cultural difference. Dr Matt Lodder talks to Charlotte Hodgman about 5,000 years of tattooing history, exploring everything from the punishment tattoos of ancient China to the pilgrim t…
 
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