show episodes
 
Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Friday nights at 7pm ET.
 
What makes us human? How are we different from chimpanzees? Who are our earliest ancestors and how do we know? Origin Stories is The Leakey Foundation’s podcast about how we became human. This award-winning show combines science and narrative to explore our human story and explain why we are the way we are. Listen and explore human evolution one story at a time.
 
This Week in Microbiology is a podcast about unseen life on Earth hosted by Vincent Racaniello and friends. Following in the path of his successful shows 'This Week in Virology' (TWiV) and 'This Week in Parasitism' (TWiP), Racaniello and guests produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (SIUE), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported through individual donations and the sponsorship of Swinburne Astronomy Online.
 
Liftoff is a fortnightly podcast about space, the universe, and everything. You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to understand the latest developments as explained by enthusiastic space fans Stephen Hackett and Jason Snell. Hosted by Jason Snell and Stephen Hackett.
 
What would happen if you fell into a black hole? How big is the universe? Just what the heck is a quasar, anyway? You've got questions, and astrophysicist Paul Sutter has the answers! Submit questions via Twitter using #AskASpaceman or post to facebook.com/PaulMattSutter. Every episode you will come closer to COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE!
 
Planetary Radio brings you the human adventure across our solar system and beyond. We visit each week with the scientists, engineers, leaders, advocates and astronauts who are taking us across the final frontier. Regular features raise your space IQ while they put a smile on your face. Join host Mat Kaplan and Planetary Society colleagues including Bill Nye the Science Guy, Bruce Betts, and Emily Lakdawalla as they dive deep into the latest space news. The monthly Space Policy Edition takes ...
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
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show series
 
Science and politics are not easy bedfellows - "Stick to the science" is a three part series which aims to find out why. In this episode we're asking how politics shapes the life of a working scientist. Be it through funding agendas, cultural lobbies or personal bias, there's a myriad of ways in which politics can shape the game; influencing the di…
 
Introducing HomeGrown Humans with Jamie Wheal. We have new episodes with Jamie Wheal to explore, 'where have we come from?', 'where are we going?', and 'why are we here?'. Jamie has been a guest on Collective Insights and is a longtime friend and collaborator of Neurohacker Collective. He will now be a regular host on the Collective Insights podcas…
 
Whenever the topic of genetics is mentioned this is always a question of ethics not far behind. Whether that is in Stem Cell research, genetic modification or even basic healthcare. In this show Robin chats to two experts in the field. Dr Sarah Chan is Chancellor’s Fellow in Ethics and Science Communicator in The Usher Institute at the University o…
 
There was a time in this world when a simple glance at a flower informed the mind about the complete nature and uses of that plant. This was a time when cymatics and natural sciences ruled the world – in tune with nature. Color, form, sound, light – you name it, all the product of a vibration rate. Now it is time to reconstruct this important knowi…
 
In this episode we explain how regions of the human genome associated with severe COVID-19 are identified, the finding that one of these regions was inherited from Neanderthals, and prolonged SARS-CoV-2 reproduction in an immunocompromised patient. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, G…
 
Science and politics are not easy bedfellows - "Stick to the science" is a three part series which aims to find out why. In this episode we delve into the past, and uncover the complicated relationship between science, politics and power. Along the way, we come up against some pretty big questions: what is science? Should science be apolitical? And…
 
The chances of mini-brains becoming sentient, and a UK government decision threatens gender diversity in academia. In this episode: 00:59 The ethics of creating consciousness Brain organoids, created by culturing stem cells in a petri dish, are a mainstay of neuroscience research. But as these mini-brains become more complex, is there the chance th…
 
In this episode, we talk about why the stock market is increasingly divorced from economic reality, and the fact that COVID-19 is proving to be a great accelerator rather than a great leveller - accelerating the trends towards income and wealth inequality that we have seen over the last 30-40 years, as well as internationally. We also discuss where…
 
We are joined by the leader of the OSIRIS-REx mission that sampled an asteroid last week. Dante reveals just how brilliantly successful the encounter was, and describes preparations for the journey back to Earth. Space journalist Nancy Atkinson tells us about Orbilander, a mission that would orbit and then descend to Saturn’s moon Enceladus in a se…
 
If you need to memorize the 27 Amendments to the American Constitution, you’re probably thinking it’s going to be a lot of work. Instead of indulging in overwhelm, consider the following fact: For thousands of years, people have been using memory techniques to commit far more than 27 pieces of information to memory. In fact, there are people alive …
 
We've collaborated with Philadelphia photographer Kyle Cassidy to tell the stories of our city's essential workers. This fall his large-scale portraits of nurses, sanitation workers, Instacart shoppers, mask-makers, and delivery drivers will be on display on the exterior of the Science History Institute, in Old City Philadelphia. Find out more at s…
 
In the final episode of Grouse, Ashley returns to a lek in Washington with biologist Michael Schroeder and finds it scorched by recent wildfire. Michael cries as he looks out over an area that was once home to one of the largest remaining pockets of sage-grouse in the state. But he says he’s not ready to retire yet — there’s more work to be done. W…
 
In this episode Will Freyman talks about identity-by-descent (IBD): howit’s used at 23andMe, and how the templatedpositional Burrows-Wheeler transform can find IBD segments in the presence ofgenotyping and phasing errors. Links: Fast and robust identity-by-descent inference with the templated positional Burrows-Wheeler transform (William A. Freyman…
 
Can black holes alter light speed? Is astrophysics the Meryl Streep of the Nobel Prize in Physics? Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice, and astrophysicist Janna Levin, PhD, answer Cosmic Queries about black holes and the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.sta…
 
It’s almost Halloween!! Our Halloween episode this year is all about some of the legends of ghostly black dogs in the UK and some other parts of the world, as well as some canid mysteries we haven’t covered before. Thanks again to Pranav for the suggestion! This is your last chance to enter the book giveaway! You have until October 31, 2020, and th…
 
This episode: Copper electrodes, rather than killing bacteria in microbial fuel cells, allow them to generate higher densities of electric current! Download Episode (5.0 MB, 7.2 minutes) Show notes: Microbe of the episode: Xipapillomavirus 2 News item Takeaways Copper is widely used as a way to make surfaces and materials antimicrobial, to cut down…
 
This week National Weather Service Tulsa WFO Meteorologist In Charge Steve Piltz joins us to talk about a career in the weather service and finding unique ways to solve forecast problems! Fun Paper Friday Do ants count their steps to get home? Wittlinger, Matthias, Rüdiger Wehner, and Harald Wolf. "The ant odometer: stepping on stilts and stumps." …
 
This week Sven joins Matt to talk to Corey Shields about communicating with Cubesats with open architecture and to chat about Cubesats in the first part of our Cubesat specialSpace Song playlist on Spotify bit.ly/spacesongsIf you enjoy the show please go over to www.Patreon.com/Interplanetary and become a Patron or even a producer of the show.If yo…
 
Why was Thomas Jefferson embarrassed about American animals? Are there moose in New Zealand? What is the only weapon in the universe that doubles as a hearing aid? Recording of my live lecture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bnpUnkwLyU Bibliography: https://docs.google.com/document/d/14Em2fnOkQvkDtmo8C-ASwlqsFyXjnihamYsQMm1K_gk/edit?usp=sharing…
 
The affidavit is covered here again and our guest is offering free template documents you can use. If the truth will set you free then the affidavit works from this premise and in a sense dissolves legal fictions. Legal fictions assume much but when truth is on the record these assumptions melt away like so much snow in spring as do the often illeg…
 
Whether we realize it or not, this planet and all life on it are influenced by grasses. Among the most important are grasses belonging to the tribe Andropogoneae. Members of this group include crops such as corn, sugarcane, and sorghum, as well as ecologically important species like big bluestem. Despite their importance, we know surprisingly littl…
 
Two stars that are undergoing a series of changes shine boldly through the autumn night. They form the system known as Capella, which is a bit more than 40 light-years away. It climbs into good view in the northeast by 8 or 9 p.m., and looks like a single bright yellow-orange star. What we see as Capella consists of two stars that are similar to ea…
 
Daniel Griffin provides a clinical report on COVID-19, then we discuss Bill Foege’s letter to CDC director Robert Redfield, the false promise of herd immunity for COVID-19, secret blueprints for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine trials released, and neuropilin-1 as a possible entry protein for the virus. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, R…
 
A little extra weight around a star’s middle shortens its lifespan. The leading light of Aries, for example, is about a billion years younger than the Sun. Yet it’s already past the end of its “normal” lifetime — a point the Sun won’t reach until at least five billion years from now. Hamal is low in the east at nightfall, far to the left of brillia…
 
If you want to know how to visualize clearly and effectively, you probably already have a vision statement written. You have written out a vision statement by hand, haven’t you? If the answer is “no,” then I’m here to tell you that your visualization is neither clear nor complete. And that means you’re still struggling to achieve your goals. If you…
 
Bats, gloves, home runs, and… physics? Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the physics of baseball with Bill Nye the Science Guy, co-host Gary O’Reilly, and DJ Price, assistant coach at Barry University. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/baseball-physics-with-bill-ny…
 
Ninecia and Chelsey, two of the founders of Black in Microbiology, join TWiM to discuss the goals of the organization, then we reveal survival of Deinococcus bacteria for 3 years in space, an experiment that addresses the panspermia hypothesis for interplanetary transfer of life. Guests: Ninecia Scott and Chelsey Spriggs You can watch this episode …
 
Bernard Baars is a pioneer in the neuroscience of consciousness. He first proposed Global Neuronal Workspace Theory back in 1980, which was before consciousness was considered an acceptable topic of scientific research. His approach inspired others including the current Global Neuronal Workspace Theory, which I discussed briefly in episode 160. Thi…
 
Big storms on the Sun can have big impacts on Earth. They can damage satellites, disrupt communications, interfere with animal navigation, and knock out power grids. And a recent study says they might even trigger earthquakes. Solar storms are common. They’re triggered by the Sun’s magnetic field, which gets tangled up. A tangle can snap, sending a…
 
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