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Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
The Sleazy Report' Is An Animated Media Talk Show Hosted By @SLEAZYCHEEZY He will give you his authentic & unfiltered opinion on Everything from Movies, TV shows, comics, and books & more Please be sure to SUBSCRIBE, LIKE, & SHARE Follow on Social Media ~ Twitter: @SLEAZYCHEEZY Instagram: @TheSleazyRepo Follow on Social Media ~ Twitter: @SLEAZYCHEEZY Instagram: @TheSleazyReport Youtube: TheSleazyReport #TheSleazyReport​​ #FilmReviews​ #MovieCritic​ #AnimatedTalkShow​​ #AnimatedPodCast #OnThi ...
 
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The Sex Pistols’ anti-establishment single ‘God Save The Queen’ was banned by the BBC when it was re-released on 27th May, 1977 by Virgin Records - mischievously, to tie-in with the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. To rub salt in the wound, the band’s ‘art-school punk’ manager, Malcolm McLaren, arranged a boat procession outside the Houses of …
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 26. Miles Davis was born. He was an American jazz musician, a trumpeter who as a bandleader and composer was one of the major influences on art from the late 1940s. Davis grew up in East St. Louis, Illinois, where his father was a prosperous dental surgeon, and began studying trumpet in his …
 
When a ragged, peculiar-looking teenage boy was found wandering the streets of Nuremberg on 26th May, 1828, it triggered a centuries-long quest to discover who he was, why he had (apparently) been raised in captivity, and (if so) whom had done such a thing to him. His name was Kasper Hauser. The newspapers went into overdrive, reporting every salac…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 25. 30 million people worldwide joined "Race against time" to raise money for starving in Africa. The event was organized by chairman and founder Chris Long, Bob Geldof (Band Aid and Live Aid) and John Anderson (Head of Global Special Events, UNICEF). A central event was the lighting of a sy…
 
The first group of Australian sportspeople to ever represent the country overseas were an Aboriginal team of cricketers, who began an acclaimed tour of England on 25th May, 1868. The team had to face racism, illness and ignorance - but won the hearts of thousands of spectators, and the British establishment. They also did some awesome spear-throwin…
 
Patti LaBelle was born. She is an American singer, songwriter, actress, and businesswoman. LaBelle began her career in the early 1960s as lead singer and front woman of the vocal group, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles. Following the group's name change to Labelle in the 1970s, they released the iconic disco song "Lady Marmalade". The band later be…
 
California had virtually no reputation as an international wine-growing region until 24th May, 1976 - when 11 wine experts gathered at a Parisian hotel and decided, in a blind taste-test, that wines from Napa Valley were indeed more quaffable than France’s most famous varieties: a decision that shook up the world of wine, and became known as ‘The J…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 23. Shuffle Along, the 1st black hit musical, opened at the 63rd St. Music Hall in New York City. The show was developed by black comedians Flournoy Miller and Aubrey Lyles and featured music by Eubie Blake and lyrics by Noble Sissle. Based loosely on Miller and Lyles’ vaudeville act “The Ma…
 
Throwing people out of windows might seem a peculiar way to protest, but it’s happened so often in history, it’s got a special name: defenestration. And perhaps the most significant of all - because it brought about the Thirty Years War - was the assault on three Habsburg officials by Bohemian malcontents in Prague on 23rd May, 1618. The dispute ha…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 22. Benjamin O. Davis Jr. became the first black Brigadier general in the United States Air Force. Davis studied at the University of Chicago before entering the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1932. Upon his graduation, he was swiftly promoted to lieutenant colone…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 21. Lowell Perry was confirmed as chairman of the Equal Opportunity Commission. He was an American football player and coach, government official, businessman, and broadcaster. Perry was the first African-American assistant coach in the National Football League (NFL), the first African Ameri…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 20. Emancipation in the State of Florida was proclaimed. On May 20, 1865, Union Brigadier Gen. Edward McCook formally announced President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation from the steps of the Knott House in Tallahassee. President Abraham Lincoln signed this proclamation on Januar…
 
Motorcycling daredevil Evel Knievel had been keen on jumping the Grand Canyon since 1968, but never staged an actual attempt. On May 20th, 1999, however, his son Robbie performed the feat on live television - and lived to tell the tale. “I’m wiped out in the head a little”, he said, before being examined by paramedics, who applied a neck brace and …
 
The Sleazy Report (Season 2) EP:1 | The Sleazy Report BACK & BETTER! Sleazy FACES The Sleazy Report' Is An Animated Media Talk Show Hosted By @SLEAZYCHEEZY He will give you his authentic & unfiltered opinion on Everything from Movies, TV shows, comics, and books & more Please be sure to SUBSCRIBE, LIKE, & SHARE Follow on Social Media ~ Twitter: @SL…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 19. Malcolm X was born. He was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist who was a popular figure during the civil rights movement, and best known for his time spent as a vocal spokesman for the Nation of Islam. Malcolm's father, Earl Little, was a leader in an African-Am…
 
Over 100 million Rubik’s Cubes were sold in just a few short years at the onset of the 1980s - a phenomenon kickstarted on 19th May, 1974, when Hungarian Professor of Architecture Ernő Rubik supposedly created the prototype for his ‘Magic Cube’. It took him a month to solve himself - a feat which seems unimpressive in a world where the current reco…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 18. Anna Julia Cooper delivered an address at the World’s Congress of Representative Women. She was an American educator and writer whose book "A Voice From the South by a Black Woman of the South" (1892) became a classic African American feminist text. Born into slavery in 1858, Cooper went…
 
Atheist, homosexual, heretic… the slurs levelled at popular playwright Christopher Marlowe came thick and fast after he was arrested on 18th May, 1593. Just twelve days later, he was murdered in a London tavern. His former roomate, Thomas Kyd, pointed the finger at Marlowe after being tortured following the discovery of a ‘treasonous’ pamphlet in h…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 17. Patricia Bath patented an apparatus that removes cataracts. She was an American ophthalmologist, inventor, and academic. Bath also became the first woman member of the Jules Stein Eye Institute, the first woman to lead a post-graduate training program in ophthalmology, and the first woma…
 
The Buttonwood Agreement, as it came to be known, effectively launched the New York Stock Exchange. Signed by 24 stockbrokers on 17th May, 1792, it promised two things - that they would trade exclusively and directly with each other, and that they wouldn’t undercut each other’s commission. But they had no permanent building, and only a tiny number …
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 16. Janet Jackson was born. She is an American singer and actress, one of the most popular recording artists of the 1980s and ’90s. The youngest of nine siblings in Motown’s famed Jackson family, Janet Jackson parlayed her family’s success into an independent career that spanned recordings, …
 
The future Queen of France was accompanied by 57 carriages, 117 footmen and 376 horses on her journey from Austria to Versailles - but remarkably took only three hours to do her hair and makeup when she tied the knot with Louis-Auguste on 16th May, 1770. Only 15 at the time, Louis was perceived - even by his closest friends and family - to be timid…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 15. Camilla Williams became the first black woman to act in a leading role in a major American opera company. She trained at Virginia State College, now Virginia State University, and received her bachelor's degree in music education. Beginning in 1944, Williams performed on the coast-to-coa…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 14. Clara Stanton Jones was born. She was the first African-American president of the American Library Association and the first African American and the first woman to serve as director of a major library system in America, as director of the Detroit Public Library. Jones obtained a well-ro…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 13. Stevie Wonder was born. He is an American singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, a child prodigy who developed into one of the most creative musical figures of the late 20th century. Blind from birth and raised in inner-city Detroit, he was a skilled musician by age eight and mad…
 
When three young kids in Fatima, Portugal reported that the Virgin Mary had appeared to them on 13th May, 1917, the incident sparked hysteria across their rural, intensely Catholic community. The ‘three secrets’ supposedly revealed that day - and the much-attended ‘Miracle of the Sun’ event prophesied that Autumn - gave a long-lasting boost to Fati…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 12. Ving Rhames was born. He is an American actor, best known for his starring role as Luther Stickell in the "Mission: Impossible" film series and his supporting role as gang kingpin Marsellus Wallace in "Pulp Fiction". He was born and raised in Harlem, New York City. He was named after NBC…
 
Ridley Scott’s ‘Gladiator’ opened in the UK on 12th May, 2000 - and was widely credited with resurrecting the ‘swords-and-sandals’ genre, sparking an interest in Roman history, and achieving that rare combination of critical praise and humongous box office success. But the epic production was problematic - not least because supporting star Ollie Re…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 11. William Grant Still was born. He was the first African American to conduct a professional symphony orchestra in the United States. Though a prolific composer of operas, ballets, symphonies, and other works, he was best known for his Afro-American Symphony (1931). He first studied composi…
 
IBM's Deep Blue conquered Russian chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov on 11th May, 1997 - in a man v machine clash Newsweek brazenly baptised ‘The Brain’s Last Stand’. Despite the incredible achievement of having created a program able to calculate 200 billion positions in three minutes, the IBM engineers were advised by their PR team not to look too …
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 10. Nelson Mandela is sworn in as the first black president of South Africa. In 1944, he joined the African National Congress (ANC), a black political organization dedicated to winning rights for the black majority in white-ruled South Africa. In 1948, the racist National Party came to power…
 
Michelangelo was a sculptor, not a painter, when on 10th May, 1508, he embarked upon the biggest gig of his career: painting the roof of the Sistine chapel in the Vatican. Outwardly reluctant, and doubtful he could complete the project, he nonetheless took the opportunity to suggest that rather than portraying the twelve apostles requested by the P…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 9. Tony Gwynn was born. He was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played 20 seasons (1982–2001) in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres, and considered one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. Gwynn attended San Diego State University…
 
Fugitive Thomas Blood sneaked his way into the Tower of London’s jewel room on 9th May, 1671 - bludgeoning the 77 year-old Keeper of the Jewels, Talbot Edwards, in the process. Disguised as a parson, the Irish adventurer had cat-fished Edwards in an audacious and complex heist that involved multiple pairs of white gloves, a fake nephew and stuffing…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 8. Carole Gist was born. She is an American TV host, model and first African American woman to win the Miss USA title. Throughout her reign as Miss USA, Gist captivated audiences with her stories of being from a single-parent home where she had a number of siblings and having to overcome num…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 7. J. R. Winters received a patent for the fire escape ladder. He was born in Leesburg, Virginia to an African-American brickmaker and a Shawnee Indian mother, who was the daughter of a noted herbalist and medical practitioner. In 1830, at the age of 14, he relocated to Chambersburg, Pennsyl…
 
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