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Sage Sociology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
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Wisdom to replenish and orient in a tender, tumultuous time to be alive. Spiritual inquiry, science, social healing, and poetry. Conversations to live by. With a 20-year archive featuring luminaries like Mary Oliver, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Desmond Tutu, each episode brings a new discovery about the immensity of our lives. Hosted by Krista Tippett, Learn more about the On Being Project’s work in the world at onbeing.org.
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Awesome Etiquette

The Emily Post Institute

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Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
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Ways & Means

Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

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Ways and Means features bright ideas for how to improve human society. The show is produced by the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.
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Ideas of India

Mercatus Center at George Mason University

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Through conversations with top thinkers in the social sciences and beyond, economist Shruti Rajagopalan explores the ideas that will propel India forward.
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Poverty Research & Policy

Institute for Research on Poverty

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The Poverty Research & Policy Podcast is produced by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) and features interviews with researchers about poverty, inequality, and policy in the United States.
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Wish you could do a better job keeping up with peer-reviewed journals? Why not listen to a podcast where behavior analysts discuss a variety of fascinating topics and the research related to them? Now you can spend your extra time thinking of ways to save the world with ABA.
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This is a podcast about deciphering human behavior and understanding why people do the things they do. I, Zach Elwood, talk with people from a wide range of fields about how they make sense of human behavior and psychology. I've talked to jury consultants, interrogation professionals, behavior researchers, sports analysts, professional poker players, to name a few. There are more than 135 episodes, many of them quite good (although some say I'm biased). To learn more, go to PeopleWhoReadPeop ...
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NASW Social Work Talks

National Association of Social Workers (NASW)

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NASW Social Work Talks informs, educates and inspires through conversations with experts and exploring issues that social work professionals care about. Brought to you by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).
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Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
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Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. The Pulse takes you behind the doors of operating rooms, into the lab with some of the world's foremost scientists, and back in time to explore life-changing innovations. The Pulse delivers stories in ways that matter to you, and answers questions you never knew you had.
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Join Katie from tutor2u Sociology and our special guests for lively discussion, support and encouragement for all GCSE & A-Level Sociology teachers. The Sociology Staffroom podcast is suitable for every Sociology teacher. Whether you're an Early Career Teacher, have taught for many years, or somewhere in between!
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Landscapes tells stories about how re-imagining land is a precursor to delivering the types of social and ecological change required to address the most pressing problems of our time.
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Writer and comedian Sovereign Syre teams up with VR innovator and former librarian Ela Darling to chronicle the lives of women and gender nonconformists that got a bad rap. Whether they were pioneers in male dominated fields, criminal masterminds, or just epic sl*ts, we here at ILL REPUTE! support women's rights, but more importantly we support women's wrongs.
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Our bodies are adapting and changing to meet the demands of the Information Age. What is happening? And what can we do about it? This six-part series is an interactive investigation into the relationship between our technology and our bodies...and how we can fix it.
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The latest thinking from the world’s leading voices on topics ranging from education, design and creativity, to politics, philosophy and economics. Fresh ideas for better futures from the RSA.
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The world's number 1 Goth talk podcast! We discuss news related to the goth experience with a different guest each month, exploring the history, music, literature, fashion and community of the culture. We also feature interviews with artists and academics, album, book and movie reviews, debates, drama and more!
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How do you know what to think unless you are told? Sadly, most people don’t and are left to rely on biased news sources, political parties, and their social media peers. Libertarian-Conservative Commentator Hannah Cox has had enough. Join her as she works through major issues facing our society and walks listeners back through the root causes of problems. Along the way you’ll learn economics, history, public policy, sociology, and other foundational principles. Learn how to think, instead of ...
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Deep Thoughts About Stupid Sh*t

Tracie Guy-Decker & Emily Guy Birken

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Ever had something you love dismissed because it’s “just” pop culture? What others might deem stupid shit, you know matters. You know it’s worth talking and thinking about. So do we. We're Tracie and Emily, two sisters who think a lot about a lot of things. From Twilight to Ghostbusters, Harry Potter to the Muppets, and wherever pop culture takes us, come overthink with us as we delve into our deep thoughts about stupid shit.
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Psych Papers

Chris Cole & Joseph Tajaran

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In Psych Papers, Chris Cole (PhD in Psychology) breaks down some of the most controversial and intriguing psychological studies and concepts to his co-host Joseph (his friend). Additionally, we conduct our own research and discuss the findings. This podcast is great for those who got a C- in Psych 101. Bad Content is composed of Chris and Joseph. Check out the video version of the podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@psychpapers
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Never has a white paper made so much of a splash as the Heritage Foundation's Project 2025. Since when do normal people even hear about such things? This week, I comb through what's actually in this thing, who is behind it, and how much people need to be concerned about its contents from a sane and centrist point of view.…
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Sharing insights from his book 'Why Politics Fails', in this 10-Minute Talk Ben Ansell FBA unpacks the challenges of democracy. Given that humans rarely agree, there can be no such thing as the ‘will of the people’ – which is why it’s so difficult to override individual self-interest in favour of our collective interest in resolving some of our mos…
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Videogames have always depicted representations of American culture, but how exactly they feed back into this culture is less obvious. Advocating an action-based understanding of both videogames and culture, this book delineates how aspects of American culture are reproduced transnationally through popular open-world videogames. Playing American: O…
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For over thirty years, modern Italy was plagued by ransom kidnappings perpetrated by bandits and organised crime syndicates. Nearly 700 men, women, and children were abducted from across the country between the late 1960s and the late 1990s, held hostage by members of the Sardinian banditry, Cosa Nostra, and the ’Ndrangheta. Subjected to harsh capt…
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Health care is a billion dollar industry in the U.S. — one of the biggest in the country. The business aspect of medicine is an invisible force in the doctor's office that shapes treatment decisions and care. As patients, financial worries can affect whether we go to the doctor in the first place, make us suspicious of expensive procedures, or even…
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The Kiki-Bouba effect is a phenomenon where people tend to associate certain sounds with specific shapes. When shown a sharp, angular shape and a soft, rounded shape, and asked which is named "Kiki" and which is "Bouba," most people will label the sharp shape as "Kiki" and the rounded shape as "Bouba." This effect suggests that there is a universal…
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Surprisingly little is known about Scottish experiences of the Second World War. Scottish Society in the Second World War (Edinburgh University Press, 2023) by Dr. Michelle Moffat addresses this oversight by providing a pioneering account of society and culture in wartime Scotland. While significantly illuminating a pivotal episode in Scottish hist…
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Welcome to Ideas of India, where we examine academic ideas that can propel India forward. My name is Shruti Rajagopalan, and I am a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Today my guests are Shreyas Narla and Kadambari Shah, who are my colleagues at the Mercatus Center and research scholars working with me on the …
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A new kind of city park has emerged in the early twenty-first century. Postindustrial parks transform the derelict remnants of an urban past into distinctive public spaces that meld repurposed infrastructure, wild-looking green space, and landscape architecture. For their proponents, they present an opportunity to turn disused areas into neighborho…
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For some four hundred years, Hindus and Christians have been engaged in a public controversy about conversion and missionary proselytization, especially in India and the Hindu diaspora. Hindu Mission, Christian Mission: Soundings in Comparative Theology (SUNY Press, 2024) reframes this controversy by shifting attention from "conversion" to a wider,…
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Is American men’s mental health worse than American women’s? Men commit suicide 3 1/2 times more frequently. Men are less likely to seek treatment for addiction or mental health disorders like depression. Do these things relate to the fact that life expectancy of men is 5.8 years less than women? Dick’s guest, Dr. Jim Hollis is a Jungian psychoanal…
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How can we improve our mental wellbeing by supporting our caregivers and healers? Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has many ideas which have come to her in part from her own remarkable life. Time magazine has called her a "Hero of Medicine." She's also an award-winning author. On this episode, we talk with her…
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Examining the changing character of revolution around the world, The Revolutionary City: Urbanization and the Global Transformation of Rebellion (Princeton UP, 2022) focuses on the impact that the concentration of people, power, and wealth in cities exercises on revolutionary processes and outcomes. Once predominantly an urban and armed affair, rev…
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The Politics of Emotion: Love, Grief, and Madness in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (Cornell University Press, 2024) by Dr. Nuria Silleras-Fernandez explores the intersection of powerful emotional states—love, melancholy, grief, and madness—with gender and political power on the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the early modern period. U…
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The 'baby boom' generation, born between the 1940s and the 1960s, is often credited with pioneering new and creative ways of relating, doing intimacy and making families. With this cohort now entering mid and later life in Britain, they are also said to be revolutionising the experience of ageing. Are the romantic practices of this 'revolutionary c…
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The 'baby boom' generation, born between the 1940s and the 1960s, is often credited with pioneering new and creative ways of relating, doing intimacy and making families. With this cohort now entering mid and later life in Britain, they are also said to be revolutionising the experience of ageing. Are the romantic practices of this 'revolutionary c…
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Fatima, the daughter of Prophet Muhammad, has an interesting legacy, one that is often shaped by sectarian differences and tensions. The sermon of Fatima, which is the focus of Mahjabeen Dhala's Feminist Theology and Sociology of Islam: A Study of the Sermon of Fatima (Cambridge University Press, 2024), though itself riddled with questions of authe…
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We knew we had to have special guest, Dr. Camille Kolu, on the show when we heard her amazing talk about buffers at last year’s Thompson Center conference. This week, our wish comes true as we discuss how buffers can contribute to our focus on improving trauma-informed practices. But, what exactly is a buffer and how does it differ from other buzzw…
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Author Matt Grace discusses the article, "Medical Authority, Trans Exceptionalism, and Americans’ Willingness to Believe Claims of Inadequate Training as Justification for the Denial of Care to Trans People" published in Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World.
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There are more than 17 million renters in the rural Unites States. While popular perceptions of eviction may be that they are predominantly an urban issue, low-income rural renters face some unique challenges in finding and maintaining secure housing. Dr. Carl Gershenson shares insights from his extensive work on eviction, and in particular from th…
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Send us a Text Message. Hold on to your butts! On this week’s episode of Deep Thoughts, Emily shares her analysis of the 1993 film Jurassic Park. She describes the thrill of being the target audience for a summer blockbuster (she was 14 when it came out) and her discomfort with how the book portrayed the only two female characters as an annoying ch…
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It's the finale of Body Electric season 2! Writer Linda Stone, who coined the term "screen apnea," knows all too well that our technology can really mess with our breathing and our health. Join her and Manoush for this 5 minute break where Linda demonstrates how playing the kazoo and practicing the physiological sigh can help you feel your best on …
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Dmitry Orlov is a Russian-American engineer and author of many books on culture and politics. He emigrated to the US with his parents at age 12 and as a young adult sojourned in Russia, where he witnessed the aftermath of the Soviet collapse. He spent many more years back in the USA living on a sailboat in Boston Harbor and later in South Carolina.…
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On today’s show, we take your questions on really uneven graduation gifts, when to put a rolled napkin on your lap, and how to respond when people always ask if you want kids. For community members, your question of the week is about what to do with a friend who won’t take no for an answer about sleeping at your house. Plus, your etiquette salute, …
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Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel talks with Paula Bialski, an Associate Professor for Digital Sociology at the University of St. Gallen in St. Gallen, Switzerland, about her recent book, Middle Tech: Software Work and the Culture of Good Enough (Princeton UP, 2024). The pair talk about the art of ethnographic study of software work, and how, maybe,…
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Imagine that you volunteer for the clinical trial of an experimental drug. The only direct benefit of participating is that you will receive up to $5,175. You must spend twenty nights literally locked in a research facility. You will be told what to eat, when to eat, and when to sleep. You will share a bedroom with several strangers. Who are you, a…
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Today on the Social-Engineer Podcast: The Security Awareness Series, Chris is joined by May Brooks-Kempler. May is a cybersecurity expert who has transformed her early curiosity, hacking 90’s computer games, into a distinguished cybersecurity career. As a board member of ISC2, an educator, a CISO and the founder of the Think Safe Cyber community, s…
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This week is part two of our two parter on Cass Elliot. Sovereign Syre and Ela Darling talk about Cass's life after the break up of The Mamas And The Papas and her vindication as a solo singer. Once money started coming in, Cass hosted artist salons at her large Laurel Canyon estate. She was kind and charismatic, easily making her the most popular …
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In politics, the best policy is usually to keep your enemies close - you often need your opponents in order to get things done afterall. But as the grifter class on the right sinks lower and lower, there's also a need to police your movement and ensure those representing it aren't doing more harm than good. Such is the case with Candace Owens, whos…
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A talk with psychologist Leonard Saxe, who is known for, amongst other things, his research into lie detectors (also known as polygraphs). Topics discussed include: why polygraphs and other forms of deception detection are unreliable; the use of polygraphs as a tool to extract information and confessions; the Richard Ames case, which involved a hig…
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Kristin J. Jacobson In her new book, The American Adrenaline Narrative (University of Georgia Press), Kristin Jacobson considers the nature of perilous outdoor adventure tales, their gendered biases, and how they simultaneously promote and hinder ecological sustainability. To explore these themes, Jacobson defines and compares adrenaline narratives…
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Last week, I had the privilege to talk with Dr. Kristen R. Ghodsee about her most recent book Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women's Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War (Duke University Press, 2019) and the behind-the-scene details of its making. Ghodsee is a professor in Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pe…
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This interview with Shawn(ta) Smith-Cruz about Grabbing Tea: Queer Conversations on Identity and Libraries and Grabbing Tea: Queer Conversations on Archives and Practice (available in 2024 from the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Library and Information Studies) explores how queerness is centered within library and archival theory an…
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Throughout US history, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people have been pathologized, victimized, and criminalized. Reports of lynching, burning, or murdering of LGBTQ people have been documented for centuries. Prior to the 1970s, LGBTQ people were deemed as having psychological disorders and subsequently subject to electrosh…
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What does the history of men tell us about life today? In Men and Masculinities in Modern Britain: A History for the Present (Manchester UP, 2024), the editors Matt Houlbrook, a Professor of Cultural History at the University of Birmingham, Katie Jones, an independent scholar living in Birmingham, and Ben Mechen, an Associate Lecturer in Modern Bri…
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How we understand autism has changed greatly over time. In this talk, Uta Frith FBA discusses developments in the scientific study of autism and its re-evaluation from a rarely diagnosed disorder to being conceptualised as a spectrum of neurodiversity. Autism can now be explored in relation to the mentalising system and other internal mechanisms th…
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