show episodes
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
From Plato to quantum physics, Walter Benjamin to experimental poetry, Frantz Fanon to the history of political radicalism, The Podcast for Social Research is a crucial part of our mission to forge new, organic paths for intellectual work in the twenty-first century: an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring members of the Institute, and occasional guests, conversing about a wide variety of intellectual issues, some perennial, some newly pressing. Each episode centers on a different top ...
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
 
Join your host, Jonathan Singer, Ph.D., LCSW in an exploration of all things social work, including direct practice, human behavior in the social environment, research, policy, field work, social work education, and everything in between. Big names talking about bigger ideas. The purpose of the podcast is to present information in a user-friendly format. Although the intended audience is social workers, the information will be useful to anyone in a helping profession (including psychology, n ...
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Unabridged philosophy audiobooks including writing by Plato (Parmenides), Aristotle (Economics) and Cicero (On Moral Duties). Topics discussed include ethics, justice, law, logic, metaphysics, God, happiness, love and beauty. Each book has been streamlined by merging separate LibriVox recordings into a single seamless whole with no interruptions. Painting: La Perle et la vague by Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry.
 
inSocialWork is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice, practice to research. inSocialWork features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.
 
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show series
 
Many believe the solution to ongoing crises in the news industry — including profound financial instability and public distrust — is for journalists to improve connections to their audiences. Conversations about the proper relationship between the media and the public go back to Walter Lippmann and John Dewey and through the public journalism movem…
 
Between the decriminalization of contraception in 1969 and the introduction of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, a landmark decade in the struggle for women's rights, public discourse about birth control and family planning was transformed. At the same time, a transnational conversation about the "population bomb" that threatened global f…
 
Welcome to Awesome Etiquette, where we explore modern etiquette through the lens of consideration, respect and honesty. On today’s show we take your questions on taking your baby to the wedding, responding to graduation announcements with gifts, inviting people from out of town to a party when you can’t offer a place to stay, and handling less than…
 
Most of us have had this experience: browsing through countless options on Netflix, unable to commit to watching any given movie—and losing so much time skimming reviews and considering trailers that it’s too late to watch anything at all. In a book borne of an idea first articulated in a viral commencement address, Pete Davis argues that this is t…
 
At the dawn of the 1950s, a promising and dedicated young painter named Helen Frankenthaler, fresh out of college, moved back home to New York City to make her name. By the decade's end, she had succeeded in establishing herself as an important American artist of the postwar period. In the years in between, she made some of the most daring, head-tu…
 
In this episode, Chris Hadnagy and Maxie Reynolds are joined by one of our greatest friends and mentors, Joe Navarro. After serving as an FBI agent for 25 years, Joe has become a nonverbal and behavioral expert. Since retiring, he has authored 14 books in 29 languages dealing with human behavior and body language. His book “What Every BODY Is Sayin…
 
In this episode, Matthew talks to Dr Simone Kolysh. Simone's research looks at Sex & Gender, Sexualities, Race & Ethnicity, and Urban Sociology. Simone is past chair of the Sociologists’ LGBTQ Caucus, member of the Sociologists for Trans Justice, and chair of the Committee on Gender Equity for the Eastern Sociological Society. In this episode, Simo…
 
Your favourite trio of social workers are back with another episode. In this episode, the first of a 2-part finale, Nadia, Fran and Eugene are join by Assistant Head Teacher, SENCo and Director Manny Awoyelu to talk about education and young people. In this powerful and informative episode, Manny shares his experience of being a teacher, his own ex…
 
After a brief hiatus, Arcane Machine is back! Just and Ed are celebrating their return to in-person recording with a satchel full of incredible music. Check out their thoughts on some goth classics from the Sisters of Mercy and London after Midnight, and get ready to stomp to some aggressive industrial bangers from Chemlab and Birmingham 6! Send yo…
 
Plastic gets a bad rap — over the years, it’s become synonymous with environmental destruction, cheap fakery, needless consumption, and mass-produced junk. But there’s a reason plastic is everywhere — it’s inexpensive, strong, and versatile; a shapeshifter that over the past century has revolutionized the way we live, from science and medicine to c…
 
In 2014 and 2015, students at dozens of colleges and universities held protests demanding increased representation of Black and Latino students and calling for a campus climate that was less hostile to students of color. Their activism recalled an earlier era: in the 1960s and 1970s, widespread campus protest by Black and Latino students contribute…
 
We are here today with Manon Garcia, the author of We Are Not Born Submissive: How Patriarchy Shapes Women’s Lives, published this year, 2021, by Princeton University Press. The book was originally published in 2018 by Climats as On ne naît pas soumise, on le devient. This book was a phenomenon and a runaway bestseller when released in France. We a…
 
The Outside: Migration as Life in Morocco (Indiana UP, 2021) traces how migration has come to occupy a striking place in the lives of many Moroccans. A full 10 percent of the population now lives outside the country, affecting individual and collective life in countless unanticipated ways. In this intimate ethnography of rural Morocco, Alice Elliot…
 
We are here today with Manon Garcia, the author of We Are Not Born Submissive: How Patriarchy Shapes Women’s Lives, published this year, 2021, by Princeton University Press. The book was originally published in 2018 by Climats as On ne naît pas soumise, on le devient. This book was a phenomenon and a runaway bestseller when released in France. We a…
 
Elemental human capacities like friendship and love, teaching and learning, have tremendous, constant, practical force. We don’t think of these in terms of what has given our species the grit to endure through hard times and even evolve in the long run. They’re lived social intelligence, part of the everyday, and so can be hard to see as serious am…
 
Elemental human capacities like friendship and love, teaching and learning, have tremendous, constant, practical force. We don’t think of these in terms of what has given our species the grit to endure through hard times and even evolve in the long run. They’re lived social intelligence, part of the everyday, and so can be hard to see as serious am…
 
Greetings Darklings across the interwebs. In this week's interview, Ken and Katy get to have a chat with Alessandro and Claudia from the band Ash Code from across the world! Together, they talk about the new EP "Fear", what life has been like in Italy vs. Kalamazoo, MI, and what fans can look forward to next! Check out more from Ash Code: Music: ht…
 
In this episode, Shruti and Keshav Desiraju discuss Indian musical traditions, devadasi women and the music of M. S. Subbulakshmi. Desiraju is the author of “Of Gifted Voice: The Life and Art of M. S. Subbulakshmi.” He has recently retired from a career with the Indian Administrative Service and in 2013 was Secretary of Health & Family Welfare to t…
 
Rational pessimism would seem to be a sensible attitude to take to life, but it can easily degenerate into negativity, anxiety or even despair. How should we deal with setbacks and pursue mental well-being? Kitty O'Lone and Ruth Adams join Ed Kessler to offer some advice... Like this podcast? Please help us by writing a review…
 
The title of Edward Westermann's new book, Drunk on Genocide: Alcohol and Mass Murder in Nazi Germany (Cornell University Press, published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2021), suggests that it is about the use of alcohol by perpetrators of the Holocaust. And it is. Westermann documents extensively how alcohol serv…
 
Today I talked to Paul Davis about her new book Beating Burnout at Work: Why Teams Hold the Secret to Well-Being and Resilience (Wharton School, 2021) What if companies held executives responsible for the turn-over rate, absenteeism rate, and the degree to which employees in the department they direct had higher-than-usual chronic mental and physic…
 
In this student takeover episode, Abby Reyes discusses - Is meritocracy a flawed and harmful ideal? Abby has just completed her A-levels at Sydenham School and is going on to study Sociology at university. You can also follow Abby's Sociology blog here - https://sociologywithabby.blogspot.com/By Matthew Wilkin
 
We are pleased to have Ferne with us talking about anthropology of food – a field that has been at the core of her research and professional focus for the last 17 years. How did food become Ferne’s topic? What were the drivers that moved her anthropological research from food, to sustainable city movements to political ecology? Ferne describes hers…
 
Catfishing. We’ve all heard of it. People appear to be prettier than they are on Tinder or Plenty of Fish and you think to yourself, ‘there’s no way this person is real.’ But what happens when you’re right? What happens when the person you’ve been in love with for the past ten years is a lie? In this week’s episode, listen in as Professor Michael D…
 
Greetings Darklings across the interwebs. In this week's interview, Ken and Katy have the amazing opportunity to talk to STR from the band Helvete Inc. Together, they learn more about STR and the road to Helvete Inc, pets, and most importantly, Helvete Inc.'s latest release, "The Inevitability ov Nothing". Check out more from Helvete Inc: Music: ht…
 
The handshake & social interaction. Laurie Taylor explores the history and meaning of a commonplace ritual which has played a role in everything from meetings with uncontacted tribes to political assassinations. He's joined by the paleoanthropologist, Ella Al-Shamahi, who asks what this everyday, friendly gesture can tell us about the enduring powe…
 
With the #StopAsianHate movement, we wanted to bring back an episode from our first season about the Model Minority Myth. It’s important to break down this myth, because we live in a world of identity politics where we fight over who gets to speak for whom and how we represent ourselves within institutions. Who is the model minority, and how did th…
 
Addressing our plastic waste problem is important for the health of our planet. On this episode, we talk with two researchers who are trying to help, Mathieu Aguesse and Alexandre Truan of Schoolab and the University of California, Berkeley. They have worked with students and industry partners to generate innovative solutions to our plastic problem…
 
In this talk Stuart Elden discusses his new book, The Early Foucault and the research he did on the first period of Michel Foucault’s career. In particular, he highlights what Foucault did before the History of Madness in 1961 and how he came to write that book as well as the way newly available archival materials help to make sense of the period. …
 
In the 1970s, American curator Donna Stein served as the art advisor to Empress Farah Diba Pahlavi, the Shahbanu of Iran. Together, Stein and Pahlavi generated an art market in Iran, as Stein encouraged Pahlavi’s patronage of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Today, the contemporary section of the Iranian National Collection―most of which cont…
 
Holocaust and Genocide historians have spent much time and effort recently considering the connections between the experiences and ideas of colonialism and subsequent mass atrocity violence. Jonas Kreienbaum's recent book A Sad Fiasco: Colonial Concentration Camps in Southern Africa, 1900–1908 (Berghahn Books, 2019) is an important contribution to …
 
What happens to rural communities when their traditional economic base collapses? When new money comes in, who gets left behind? Pushed Out: Contested Development and Rural Gentrification in the US West (U Washington Press, 2021) offers a rich portrait of Dover, Idaho, whose transformation from "thriving timber mill town" to "economically depressed…
 
Many people think prisons are all the same-rows of cells filled with violent men who officials rule with an iron fist. Yet, life behind bars varies in incredible ways. In some facilities, prison officials govern with care and attention to prisoners' needs. In others, officials have remarkably little influence on the everyday life of prisoners, some…
 
After a cascade of failures left residents of Flint, Michigan, without a reliable and affordable supply of safe drinking water, citizens spent years demanding action from their city and state officials. Complaints from the city's predominantly African American residents were ignored until independent researchers confirmed dangerously elevated blood…
 
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