show episodes
 
At Prison Professors and Compliance Mitigation, we offer strategies and insight for people who want to avoid investigations or get the best outcomes if authorities have targeted them. Michael Santos served 26 years in federal prison and he hosts the show. Learn how to prepare. Contact us at Team@PrisonProfessors.com. For more information, call or text: 949-205-6056.
 
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show series
 
Joel Bakan joins the podcast to discuss his books, and the films based on them. He outlines the fundamental conflict inherent in companies ostensibly committed to ESG principles while simultaneously driven by a legal requirement to maximize shareholder value. Episode resources: Mentioned at (03:30): The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Prof…
 
Investigative reporter Sam Cooper describes the waves of drugs and laundered money from China crashing on Canada’s shores. Sam's new book is “Wilful Blindness: How a Network of Narcos, Tycoons, and CCP Agents Infiltrated the West.”By Alexandra Wrage with Sam Cooper
 
John Heathershaw of the University of Exeter discusses the working paper he co-authored for the National Endowment for Democracy: “Paying for a World Class Affiliation: Reputation Laundering in the University Sector of Open Societies.” He shows how vulnerable universities are to abuse by kleptocrats seeking to shape the conversation, often quite su…
 
Omar Alshogre, refugee, political activist with the Syrian Emergency Task Force, and first year Georgetown University student, shares the wrenching story of his three years as a political prisoner in the worst of Syria’s prisons. He discusses the role that extortion plays there, simultaneously delegitimizing the regime further and propping it up fi…
 
Josh Rudolph at the Alliance for Securing Democracy at the German Marshall Fund discusses how we should approach corruption and kleptocracy from a policy perspective and why Treasury needs to ‘get with the program.’ Episode resources: Mentioned at (00:41): The Fight Against Corruption Needs Economists, by Josh Rudolph, Foreign Affairs, 17 May 2021 …
 
Oliver Bullough, Tom Burgis and Sarah Chayes, authors of three of the best books on global corruption, gather for a panel at the Annapolis Book Festival for a fascinating discussion about how the corrupt operate, often with impunity, and what can be done to slow the pace of looting.By Alexandra Wrage with Oliver Bullough, Tom Burgis and Sarah Chayes
 
Josh Kirschenbaum is a senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund’s Alliance for Securing Democracy and formerly served as acting director of the Office of Special Measures at Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). He joins the podcast to discuss investment funds and the gaping loophole they create through which vast sums of money…
 
In our last podcast before the US election, Mandy Patinkin and Kathryn Grody describe with passion their work with the International Rescue Committee. They tell us what America as a haven means to them and mourn the news that 545 children separated from their parents on the US southern border cannot be restored to their parents. They conclude with …
 
Illya Antonenko, TRACE’s Director of Compliance Resources, joins the podcast to talk about his perception of Eastern European corruption through an American lens. Illya grew up in the former Soviet Union and, as an adult, moved to the United States where he began his legal and compliance career.By Alexandra Wrage with Illya Antonenko
 
For World Pangolin Day on Saturday, we’re reposting our podcast about the beleaguered pangolin. Professor Katharine Abernethy discusses the dramatic and illegal overhunting and subsequent smuggling of pangolins, the most trafficked animal in the world, to supply the Asian market with their scales believed—without evidence—to cure cancer.…
 
Michael Johnston joins the podcast to discuss his new book, with co-author Scott Fritzen: The Conundrum of Corruption. Michael is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science Emeritus at Colgate University and has written extensively on the underlying causes of corruption and how best to tackle it. In this podcast, he urges a new approach to …
 
Nicola Bonucci and Nat Edmonds, in Paul Hastings’ Paris and Washington offices respectively, discuss the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention and the Working Group and its recent Phase 4 review of the United States and wrap up with some recommendations for multinational corporations.By Alexandra Wrage with Nicola Bonucci and Nat Edmonds
 
Companies primarily adopt compliance programs because they recognize the need to mitigate risk. Leaders want to get the end result of a safer workplace with less legal exposure. Merely adopting a compliance program, however, without comprehensive implementation, may not yield the return on investment that a leader wants. On any given day, we can tu…
 
Visit us at ComplianceMitigation.com As described in earlier modules, government investigators do not act without having a specific intention. If they ask questions or subpoena documents, they likely already have invested thousands of hours and they believe they can build a case. When they start talking with people in a company, they want to gather…
 
ComplianceMitigation.com Previous modules offered insights we believe leaders should consider when designing an effective compliance program and risk-management strategy for their organizations. The more leaders customize their compliance and best-practice programs, the better they safeguard against intrusive investigations that could threaten the …
 
Compliance Mitigation dot com For reasons expressed throughout these modules, every business leader should consider possible steps to lessen potential exposure to a government investigation. Three suggestions follow: Show a commitment “to doing good” in all communications. Document processes that show a commitment to operating the business with pri…
 
Visit us at Compliance Mitigation.com Although we can control our own behavior, we don’t always have an ability to know how others will behave. When business leaders delegate responsibilities, they simultaneously raise their level of risk. Business leaders may not know what a team member is saying to a customer or how that team member may be acting…
 
Establishing a compliance and training system begins with a commitment to transparency. The first step would be to document the company’s story and the value proposition it offers to consumers. The next step would be to write a process map and training schedule. The more detail leaders can bring to the process map, the more they will minimize expos…
 
Jennifer Taub, author, legal scholar, professor and advocate, joins the podcast to talk about her latest book: Big Dirty Money: The Shocking Injustice and Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime. Jennifer focuses, in particular, on how much more gently we treat corporate financial crime than we do very petty financial crime, in spite of the fact that the…
 
Visit us at ComplianceMitigation.com What are some of the early signs that a government agency has launched an investigation? Subtle clues may surface. For example, a trusted friend or colleague may start asking questions, or sending emails that detail criminal acts. Those inquiries may be fishing expeditions, or an effort to get incriminating evid…
 
How Government Agencies Conduct Investigations Business leaders and team members should understand how government agencies begin investigations. Typically, neither business leaders nor front-line staff even know that agencies may have taken an interest. Despite their lack of knowledge, investigators may be looking into operations at the company, or…
 
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