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Contact the show We talk to Tim Frayling and Rachel Freathy about how they discovered the “Fat gene”. Working with Oxford, the Exeter team showed a genetic change near FTO predisposed to obesity. This was the first and largest common genetic change altering weight.By Andrew Hattersley and Maggie Shepherd
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Contact the show In this special episode, we hear from Professor Tim Frayling who was Andrew and Sian’s first PhD student in 1995. He rapidly became the head of the analysis for the genetic susceptibility for Type 2 diabetes. His leadership has made Exeter an international leader in polygenic trait genetics.…
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Contact the show In this special episode, we hear from Professor Sian Ellard who, like Andrew and Maggie, started in Exeter in 1995. Sian set up the Exeter molecular genetics laboratory from scratch. Through Sian’s leadership, this laboratory became world leading for both research and NHS diagnostic testing.…
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Contact the show In this episode, Maggie and Andrew talk to Imran Bashir about the difficult journey he and his family have been on since his daughter was born without a pancreas. They also hear from star scientist Dr Elisa De Franco about the long and challenging scientific journey to solve the genetic mystery of why her pancreas did not develop.…
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Contact the show In this special episode Andrew Hattersley talks with co-presenter Maggie Shepherd to identify what led to her joining the Exeter team in 1995 and ending up becoming the leading nurse for monogenic diabetes with a role combining clinical care, research and educationBy Andrew Hattersley and Maggie Shepherd
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Contact the show In this episode, Maggie and Andrew start by talking to Carsyn Underwood and her mums Karla and Donna about Carsyn’s diagnosis of neonatal diabetes and how she got the right treatment very early and had an the excellent outcome as a result,. They go on to talk to Professor Tim McDonald, a top NHS laboratory scientist, who has been r…
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Contact the show In this episode, Maggie and Andrew talk to Dr Pam Bowman, the doctor scientist, whose research has greatly advanced our understanding of neonatal diabetes. Pam showed treatment with sulphonylurea tablets control the glucose excellently in the long term and she transformed our understanding of how thinking, and development are alter…
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Contact the show In this episode Maggie and Andrew talk to Dame Frances Ashcroft the remarkable Oxford scientist who has dedicated her life to understanding the key role of potassium channel in insulin secretion by the pancreatic beta-cell. Her work was crucial both before and after the Exeter genetic discovery in neonatal diabetes…
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Contact the show In this episode, we hear from Laurie and Mike Jaffe from Chicago, USA. They spread the word about neonatal diabetes to over 100M people around the world by an inspirational media campaign focused on their daughter, Lilly and how the diagnosis and resulting treatment change transformed her life.…
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Contact the show In this episode we hear from Agnes Graja and Helen John, two of the national team of Genetic Diabetes Nurses that spread the news about neonatal diabetes across the UK. They identified and improved treatment in insulin-treated adults who had been diagnosed with diabetes in the first 6 months of life.…
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Contact the show In this special episode Maggie Shepherd talks with co-presenter Andrew Hattersley exploring what led to him ending up as a research scientist and diabetes consultant in Exeter in 1995. They go back into how he became a doctor and what took him into research including surprising revelations about a transformative time in Africa as a…
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Contact the show In this episode we hear about how sulphonylurea tablets were discovered to be an unexpected. and remarkably effective, new treatment for neonatal diabetes. Maggie and Andrew talk to Professor Ewan Pearson, the doctor scientist, who worked with doctors around the world to prove how good this treatment was and how it worked. More on …
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