show episodes
 
Listen in on the latest Town Hall conversation, wherever you are! In the Moment is a weekly podcast featuring in-depth interviews curated by Town Hall’s Digital Media Manager, Jini Palmer. Senior Correspondent Steve Scher, along with a host of Seattle journalists and thought leaders, take on topics ranging from science and health, civics and culture, to the arts—and beyond! Join us, In the Moment, for expansive talks from Town Hall’s digital stage.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Like it or not, crows are our neighbors. Whether you’ve been dive-bombed by one, heard them swarming in the trees at sunset, or watched them gather ominously on the power lines à la The Birds, everyone in Seattle has a corvid story— often in the form of a complaint. But crows are remarkable, highly intelligent creatures who have much to teach us ab…
 
American football emerged in the last decades of the 19th century; today it is the most popular sport in the country, watched and played by millions of people — and at the professional level, generating billions of dollars in revenue — each year. While women’s involvement in football has grown in more recent years, it is historically a sport played…
 
Visual art holds the extraordinary power to connect the dots between ideas or emotions, the person thinking or feeling them, and the outside viewer; but how might the viewer go beyond simply looking to experiencing art, in all its joys and especially in its challenges and discomforts? In the 114th episode of Town Hall’s In the Moment podcast, Elish…
 
Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Harry. Whatever name you know him by, he is ubiquitous in the greater Seattle area, spotted everywhere from bumper stickers to roadside landmarks. In an otherwise skeptical city replete with “science is real” lawn signs, it seems that many of us believe— or at least want to believe— in Bigfoot. As part of the Beasts of Seattle p…
 
Vietnamese American musician Julian Saporiti grew up in Nashville, surrounded by music made by people who didn’t look like him. Determined to dig deeper into the definition of American Folk music as part of his extensive doctoral studies, Saporiti began to explore his own family’s history, pore over archival material, and conduct interviews; what h…
 
The orca is an apex predator, and yet, without Chinook salmon to feed on and silent waters to hunt in, Seattle’s most famous animal cannot survive. There are only 73 Southern Resident killer whales remaining, and the population will have a hard time growing unless we change our behavior to accommodate them. As part of the Beasts of Seattle podcast …
 
What might a post-capitalistic world look like? Can money, jobs, and politics be truly democratized? Will banks cease to exist? Globally recognized economist Yanis Varoufakis dreams up an alternative reality to give us a glimpse of what such a world might look like in his new work of science fiction, Another Now. Varoufakis, the former finance mini…
 
There are famously more dogs in Seattle than there are children—a function of the city’s high cost of living, perhaps, or a sign that our transient tech workforce craves furry friendship. But canines are so much more than modern-day apartment-dwelling companions; long ago, the Salish Wool Dog provided blankets for Coast Salish peoples and today, wo…
 
Debbie Millman returns to the show to discuss her new book, "Why Design Matters: Conversations with the World’s Most Creative People," a curated anthology of conversations from your award-winning podcast “Design Matters," as well as why she enjoys teaching online, why she initially thought she was a terrible interviewer and what her conversations w…
 
Nearly one in five people in the U.S. are Latinx, and they make up the second-largest ethnic and racial group in the country. Despite such a large and growing population, the community remains misunderstood and underrecognized. Editor Diana Campoamor addresses areas of inequity and brings readers messages of hope and compassion in If We Want to Win…
 
Only the occasional sea otter swims in Puget Sound, yet the adorable marine mammal is a local mascot. Cuddly cartoon otters appear on posters lining our waterfront and appear on their fair share of “Greetings from Seattle” postcards. Meanwhile, on Washington’s outer coast, a recently reintroduced population of sea otters is on the rise. As part of …
 
Can there ever be reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in a nation rooted in a legacy of violence and systemic racism? In Town Hall’s 110th Episode of the In the Moment podcast, Steve Scher interviews Margaret D. Jacobs, who explores such questions in her book After One Hundred Winters: In Search of Reconciliation on America’…
 
From Pike Place Market to the Ballard Locks, Salmon are stalwart icons of Seattle. But as they face warming waters and stormwater runoff, their future is threatened and uncertain. As part of the Beasts of Seattle Series, Town Hall’s Podcast Artist-in-Residence Samantha Allen interviews artist and American Indian Studies instructor Joe Seymour, Pike…
 
In May of 2008, a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck Sichuan, China in the middle of the afternoon. Entire towns were destroyed, schools collapsed, and over 80,000 people died — many of them schoolchildren. When grief-stricken families were denied information about exactly who and how many children died, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei initiated a critical a…
 
The Pacific Northwest is proud of its wildlife. Here in Seattle, certain creatures have become local mascots, like the salmon swimming up Pipers Creek, the ever adorable sea otters at the aquarium, and the endangered Southern Resident Orca struggling to survive in our waters. But what can our shared history with these animals tell us about our regi…
 
“Gender is queer for everyone,” Kathryn Bond Stockton claims in her newest book with MIT Press, Gender(s). And no matter how “normal” people try to make it, it’s just strange, from the words people use to the clothes they wear. With hefty doses of wit and humor, Stockton takes readers on a fascinating, sometimes absurd journey through topics like t…
 
Bill Starkey is Executive Creative Director at quench, a food & beverage brand-building boutique. With over twenty years of experience, he has worked on brands such as Sealy Mattresses, Comcast, HBO and Under Armour, just to name a few. He joins the show for a conversation about how the fear of "the fear of failure" motivated him, why he's more int…
 
Lately, the words of Greek Philosopher Heraclitus seem to ring truer than ever: Change really is the only constant. As societies grapple with COVID-19, racial justice, environmental crises, and rapidly shifting technology, it’s become clear that the current political-economic framework is fraying. Is it time to make new moral and political choices …
 
Since 2011 James Hultquist-Todd has made high quality custom and retail typefaces for agencies, studios, and organizations around the world through his foundry, JTD Type. He joins the podcast for a conversation about getting his start as a tailor, the similarities between making clothing and design typography, why each typeface is its own learning …
 
Have you ever wished you could know what’s going on inside your body, or at least have a better way to monitor its well-being? What if you knew the precise kind of diet that works best for your unique microbiome? The body can be a mysterious vessel, a strange feeling considering how much time we spend inside of them. But in his new book, The Secret…
 
For over 30 years, the Pomegranate Center was an organizational force that helped convene communities and build over 60 art-filled gathering spaces across the globe. Beyond helping communities imagine and build physical spaces, the Seattle-area organization developed a tried-and-true process for collaboration: the Pomegranate Method became a teacha…
 
Pacific Northwesterners love to camp. Chances are, at this very moment, someone you know is packing away an impossibly tiny stove and donning a puffy jacket for a weekend away in the mountains. But why— and how— did camping become a recreational pastime? Kicking off a new season of the In the Moment podcast, Erika Lundahl interviews Camping Grounds…
 
Tad Carpenter is a designer, illustrator, author and teacher based in Kansas City, Missouri. He joins the show to discuss his new book, "Sunday Suns," a collection of work from his Instagram series that he started in 2015, in which he creates a new sun illustration every Sunday. Ryan and Tad also talk Philly and Kansas City sport connections, growi…
 
The 1970s were as turbulent as the 1960s were radical. In David Laskin’s new novel, What Sammy Knew, this is the historical backdrop in which we find 17-year-old Sam Stein, a Long Island native raised in a cushy suburban life of live-in housekeepers and insular wealth. On New Year’s Eve 1969, Sam is forced to come face to face with the uncomfortabl…
 
For some it seems that most of the news about academic social sciences—anthropology, economics, political science, etc—is negative. But in response to the criticism he’s seen, political science professor Matt Grossman argues that, far from crisis, social science is undergoing an unparalleled renaissance of ever-broader understanding and application…
 
Join us for a spotlight on one of our partner bookstores, Estelita’s Library, a “justice-focused community library and bookstore” originally located in the Beacon Hill neighborhood. Local Journalist Mike Davis chats with Estelita’s co-founder Edwin Lindo about the history and founding of the bookstore and considers the impact the Library has on the…
 
Since our 2017 season, hosts Jini Palmer, Steve Scher, and local correspondents have interviewed hundreds of luminaries, local officials, and national and international thought leaders as part of our In The Moment podcast. This month, we celebrate the series’ 100th edition with a special introspective episode that reflects on how Town Hall faced th…
 
In what ways can words reach across time and distance, to speak with the dead, the unborn, past selves, and future possibilities? How do poets engage in conversations that can animate and embody what is not yet or no longer here? In this episode, correspondent and Lyric World host Shin Yu Pai talks to poet Meredith Clark about her lyric book-length…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login