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Named after Charles Babbage, a 19th-century polymath and grandfather of computing, Babbage is a weekly podcast on science and technology. Host Alok Jha talks to our correspondents about the innovations, discoveries and gadgetry making the news. Published every Tuesday by Economist Podcasts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
Checks and Balance unlocks American politics by taking a big theme each week and digging into the data, the ideas, and the history shaping the country. Join John Prideaux, Charlotte Howard, Idrees Kahloon and Jon Fasman as they talk to politicians, pollsters, academics and people across the country about the great experiment of American democracy. For more from Checks and Balance, sign up at https://www.economist.com/newsletters/checks-and-balance to receive our weekly newsletter. Hosted on ...
 
The World in Brief from The Economist tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full World in Brief, three times each day: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer. Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://www.economist.com/the-world-in-brief for access to the ...
 
Peter Konjoian (Grower) & Michelle Klieger (Economist) share expert insights to help small and medium-sized growers adjust to the rapidly changing farm and food landscape as well as increase the productivity and profitability of their operation. We are one part grower and one part business just like your business. Edited by Katelyn Parsons
 
Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events. Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures ...
 
Economist Impact combines the rigour of a think-tank with the creativity of a media brand to engage an influential global audience. We partner with corporations, foundations, NGOs and governments across big themes including sustainability, health and the changing shape of globalisation to catalyse change and enable progress. The Economist Group includes Economist Impact, Economist Intelligence, Economist Education and The Economist newspaper. Follow Asia Perspectives by Economist Impact to m ...
 
Xi Jinping is the most powerful person in the world. But the real story of China's leader remains a mystery. The Economist's Sue-Lin Wong finds out how he rose to the top, and what it means for China—and the rest of the world—now that he has ripped up the rule book to stay in power, perhaps for the rest of his life. For more on China listen to The Economist’s new weekly podcast Drum Tower (here) and subscribe to The Economist with the best offer at economist.com/chinapod Hosted on Acast. See ...
 
Scientists talk about what they do and why they do what they do. Their motivations, their trajectory, their setbacks, their achievements. They offer their personal take on science, mentoring and the many aspects that have shaped their work and their lives. Hosted by journalist Vivien Marx. Her work has appeared in Nature journals, Science, The Economist, The NY Times, The Wall Street Journal Europe and New Scientist among others. (Art: Justin Jackson)
 
Steve Levitt, the iconoclastic University of Chicago economist and co-author of the Freakonomics book series, tracks down other high achievers and asks questions that only he would think to ask. Guests include all-time Jeopardy! champion Ken Jennings, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, WNBA champion Sue Bird, Operation Warp Speed chief Moncef Slaoui, and neuroscientist/actress Mayim Bialik. People I (Mostly) Admire is a production of the Freakonomics Radio Network.
 
Time and Attention is a podcast that will help you become more intentional and productive. Hosted by Chris Bailey, the author of two productivity books, and Ardyn Nordstrom, a nerdy economist, the show covers topics as diverse as productivity, focus, procrastination, time management, money, happiness, gratitude, and disconnecting. We occasionally also welcome a bestselling author onto the show to talk about a book they wrote.
 
Two of The Economist's China correspondents, Alice Su and David Rennie, analyse the stories at the heart of this vast country and examine its influence beyond its borders. They’ll be joined by our global network of correspondents and expert guests to examine how everything from party politics to business, technology and culture are reshaping China and the world. For almost seven centuries the beats of China’s most famous drum tower, or gulou, kept people in Beijing to time. The Economist’s l ...
 
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Freakonomics, M.D.

1
Freakonomics, M.D.

Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher

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Each week, physician and economist Dr. Bapu Jena will dig into a fascinating study at the intersection of economics and healthcare. He takes on questions like: Why do kids with summer birthdays get the flu more often? Can surviving a hurricane help you live longer? What do heart surgery and grocery-store pricing have in common?
 
We are a "deep dive" news podcast, for Americans who get their news from the Internet. Our mission is to give the listener succinct, fact based analysis both non-ideological and independent from a California, Silicon Valley perspective. Your host Jim Herlihy is a published author: his novel “Deceit and Dirty Money” is available on line. He served as President of the SF Public Library Commission 1992 - 1996. While working in Latin America, he was a stringer for The Economist, The Times and th ...
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
The Point Blank Show is an excuse to spend sometime with people having immense insights and significant achievements. The guests on the show range from entrepreneurs, artists, business leaders, writer, sports personality etc. Each show attempts to bring out insights and often making us think about things that aren't obvious.
 
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Trade Talks

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Trade Talks

Peterson Institute for International Economics

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Chad P. Bown (Peterson Institute for International Economics) hosts a podcast about the economics of international trade and policy. From trade wars to trade deals, this podcast covers trade developments with insights and economic analysis from one of the world's top trade geeks.
 
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The Sage Sayers

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The Sage Sayers

Debbi Gardiner McCullough

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A weekly podcast on ways to stay calm and compel others as you communicate. Along with executive communications tips and strategies, we interview intriguing individuals who've found the "Sage approach" by finding gifts, opportunities, and knowledge within trying situations. New Zealander show host, Debbi Gardiner McCullough, has written on social and business trends and struggles for the Economist, the Guardian, and Financial Times of London. She's a self-retired college professor of writing ...
 
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show series
 
House Republicans hope that by delving into Hunter Biden’s business dealings they’ll find a trail of wrongdoing leading back to the president. Is this just the usual partisan mudslinging? Or will the Hunter Biden saga spell trouble for Joe Biden? Andrew Rice from New York magazine tells us what is on Hunter Biden’s laptop. The Economist’s James Ben…
 
South Africa’s infrastructure—its ports, railways and power grid—are struggling and poorly managed. Ordinary South Africans are increasingly fed up. We profile Russia’s new military commander in Ukraine. And our obituaries editor remembers one of Britain’s finest rural writers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, …
 
The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating. On this week’s podcast,…
 
Three firms are racing to become the first private company to land on the Moon. The potential commercial opportunities range from mining lunar resources to establishing a human base with communications infrastructure. But the commercialisation of the Moon raises tricky questions about who owns Earth’s closest neighbour. Steve Altemus, CEO of Intuit…
 
Gridlock is good, at the national level. More political and economic decisions should be made at the state and local levels. The Bible calls for even more decisions at the family and church levels. A friend asked recently about the “horrible” in-fighting that was necessary to elect Kevin McCarthy speaker of the house. I……
 
Decades ago, cabbage demand was off the charts and Dr. Konjoian listened to his father not to grow cabbage the following season. Dive into the technical terms and more examples of leading indicators in the agriculture business. We have talked about fuel prices and labor, but how can farmers adapt to local consumer behaviors and national fashion tre…
 
We turn the spotlight on forecasting itself, and look back on the predictions we made for 2022. How accurate were we? How do “superforecasters” look into the future? And how can forecasters account for irrational world leaders when predicting major events? Charlotte Howard, The Economist’s executive editor, talks to Tom Standage, editor of The Worl…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Disney’s second century, Turkey’s looming dictatorship (10:25) and how young people spend their money (17:35). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. S…
 
• Recession – or worse – ahead, warns economist • “There’s a good chance we’ll have a recession in 2023” (Total Recorded Time is 25:02) The nation’s economy, if not the world economy, is facing a severe downturn, says economist Murray Sabrin, an advocate for free markets. “If you look at what the Federal Reserve has been doing in terms of manipulat…
 
Less than 12 short months ago, BTC was trading at over 50K, Ethereum was trading at over 4K, and the entire crypto world looked forward to 2022 with the hope that easing lockdown restrictions and a growing economy would bring good fortune to the crypto market. It was predicted that Bitcoin would reach over 100k, adoption would grow, and a new finan…
 
In a polarised world, the opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. In one of our favourite episodes of 2022, host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and the author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argu…
 
House Republicans hope that by delving into Hunter Biden’s business dealings they’ll find a trail of wrongdoing leading back to the president. Is this just the usual partisan mudslinging? Or will the Hunter Biden saga spell trouble for Joe Biden? Andrew Rice from New York magazine tells us what is on Hunter Biden’s laptop. The Economist’s James Ben…
 
South Africa’s infrastructure—its ports, railways and power grid—are struggling and poorly managed. Ordinary South Africans are increasingly fed up. We profile Russia’s new military commander in Ukraine. And our obituaries editor remembers one of Britain’s finest rural writers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, …
 
The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating. On this week’s podcast,…
 
This episode centers around the specter of violence and surfaces some of Sam’s most controversial positions and difficult conversations. We begin with author and former FBI hostage negotiator Chris Voss, who delivers some potentially life-saving aspects of “tactical empathy,” which can also be applied to less extreme circumstances. Author and secur…
 
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, science grew to dominate the practice of medicine, all but abandoning the practice of healing which had been its cornerstone for millennia. Ed Cohen shows that the revival of healing as a part of medical practice has an important and fulfilling role to play. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/j…
 
Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in Ameri…
 
Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in Ameri…
 
In December 2022, nuclear fusion ignition occurred at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Physicists have pursued the technology to achieve such a break through for decades. Nuclear fusion power promises limitless, clean energy. It is the energy that fuels the sun and the stars. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/james-herlihy/message…
 
Three firms are racing to become the first private company to land on the Moon. The potential commercial opportunities range from mining lunar resources to establishing a human base with communications infrastructure. But the commercialisation of the Moon raises tricky questions about who owns Earth’s closest neighbour. Steve Altemus, CEO of Intuit…
 
After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Econom…
 
After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Econom…
 
It would be a bold prediction to say that capitalism is on the way out. Nor should it be. It has provided growth and innovation for the global economy, but has it become too laissez faire? Phil asks Steve whether we need to return to the mixed-economy many of us grew up with – when governments controlled large essential sectors, such as transport a…
 
China is celebrating the lunar new year. The Ministry of Transport predicts that by February 15th over 2bn journeys will be made by Chinese heading to their home towns–and for some migrant workers, it'll be the first time they've returned since the start of the covid-19 pandemic three years ago. The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, h…
 
China is celebrating the lunar new year. The Ministry of Transport predicts that by February 15th over 2bn journeys will be made by Chinese heading to their home towns–and for some migrant workers, it'll be the first time they've returned since the start of the covid-19 pandemic three years ago. The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, h…
 
Dr. Steven Salzberg is a Johns Hopkins University researcher and director of the Center for Computational Biology at Hopkins. I spoke with him about genomics, about long-read sequencing, about human biology and human diversity, about funding, technology choice, about complete and incomplete genomes, about jobs in bioinformatics. He described his te…
 
Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation. Hos…
 
Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation. Hos…
 
My guest this week is Marie-Louise Pereira, a leadership and mental wellness coach based in France. Marie-Louise helps leaders replace stuck, unhappy feelings with a confidence that helps them achieve their dreams, find better balance, and with that, a more fulfilling career. Marie-Louise and I spoke in the New Year on a popular problem many of our…
 
We turn the spotlight on forecasting itself, and look back on the predictions we made for 2022. How accurate were we? How do “superforecasters” look into the future? And how can forecasters account for irrational world leaders when predicting major events? Charlotte Howard, The Economist’s executive editor, talks to Tom Standage, editor of The Worl…
 
Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right. For full access to print, digital and a…
 
Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right. For full access to print, digital and a…
 
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