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36. John's Gospel, Finale. The Pearl and the Currents.

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Manage episode 396136603 series 2911288
Content provided by Chris Palmero. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Chris Palmero or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

BORN IN THE SECOND CENTURY completes its survey of the Gospel of John, having demonstrated that the author of John borrowed wholesale from the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke to construct his narrative.
In this episode, host Christ Palmero covers the final section of John, which deals with Jesus' arrest, trials, crucifixion, and burial. In examining the author's use of traditional setpieces like the Anointing at Bethany, the Entry into Jerusalem, the Division of Garments, the Two Malefactors, and the Vinegar Sponge, we demonstrate beyond any doubt that John's Gospel is a derivative work.
Anyone who listens to this episode can learn about who wrote the Gospel of John; whether Justin Martyr was aware of the Gospel of John; why Christian theologians shouldn't use irreverent humor; and the meaning of the mysterious word "Pavement" that the author uses.
Opening reading: Philip K. Dick's short story about a failed-time travel experiment helps demonstrate how the Jesus of John, like the proverbial pearl swept up in the currents, is doomed to suffer the same fate as his Synoptic counterpart.

Support the Show.

YouTube: @borninthesecondcentury
E-mail: secondcenturypodcast@gmail.com
Music: Pompeii Gray on Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube, SoundCloud

  continue reading

37 episodes

Artwork
iconShare
 
Manage episode 396136603 series 2911288
Content provided by Chris Palmero. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Chris Palmero or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

BORN IN THE SECOND CENTURY completes its survey of the Gospel of John, having demonstrated that the author of John borrowed wholesale from the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke to construct his narrative.
In this episode, host Christ Palmero covers the final section of John, which deals with Jesus' arrest, trials, crucifixion, and burial. In examining the author's use of traditional setpieces like the Anointing at Bethany, the Entry into Jerusalem, the Division of Garments, the Two Malefactors, and the Vinegar Sponge, we demonstrate beyond any doubt that John's Gospel is a derivative work.
Anyone who listens to this episode can learn about who wrote the Gospel of John; whether Justin Martyr was aware of the Gospel of John; why Christian theologians shouldn't use irreverent humor; and the meaning of the mysterious word "Pavement" that the author uses.
Opening reading: Philip K. Dick's short story about a failed-time travel experiment helps demonstrate how the Jesus of John, like the proverbial pearl swept up in the currents, is doomed to suffer the same fate as his Synoptic counterpart.

Support the Show.

YouTube: @borninthesecondcentury
E-mail: secondcenturypodcast@gmail.com
Music: Pompeii Gray on Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube, SoundCloud

  continue reading

37 episodes

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