353: A Week with WSL

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Manage episode 231521795 series 2440919
By Discovered by Player FM and our community — copyright is owned by the publisher, not Player FM, and audio streamed directly from their servers.

Mike's back with thoughts on his recent adventures with the Windows Subsystem for Linux and what it might mean for the future of Linux development.

Plus the hurdles of working with an eGPU, why you should learn languages you might not use, and a neat pick for playing with HTTP.

Links:

  • Mike's eGPU Goodness
  • Moving on from Rails and what’s next — A lot has happened during that time. I created Diesel, an ORM for Rust. In April of last year, I began managing the operations of crates.io, which eventually led to the creation of the crates.io team which I co-lead. I also started to find myself less able to effectively contribute to Rails. It became clear that I have a different vision for the future, and that I would never make it onto the core team.
  • Learn more programming languages, even if you won't use them — By learning a new language, even if it stays in your toolbox for all eternity, you gain a new perspective and a different way of thinking about problems.
  • WLinux's New Name — Hayden Barnes, of Whitewater Foundry, told El Reg that WLinux was only ever supposed to be a codename, and the new name "reflects our distribution's connection to both Linux and Windows". He added "it is close to the Japanese pronunciation and transliteration of penguin, which is pengin." Japan remains the company's top market.
  • Pengwin by Whitewater Foundry — Pengwin is the easiest to use Linux distribution on Windows Subsystem for Linux.
  • HTTP Prompt - An Interactive Command Line HTTP Client — HTTP Prompt (or HTTP-prompt) is an interactive command-line HTTP client built on HTTPie and prompt_toolkit, featuring autocomplete and syntax highlighting.
  • Linux Academy Limited Time Sale!
  • LINUX Unplugged Episode 296: Defining Desktop Linux — The way we’ve been thinking about Desktop Linux is all wrong. We start by defining Desktop Linux, and where it might be going in the future.

311 episodes available. A new episode about every 7 days averaging 48 mins duration .