Best Landscapearchitecture podcasts we could find (Updated May 2019)
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Join Sean Lally in conversation about architecture’s future, as both earth’s environment and our human bodies are now open for design. The podcast engages a diverse range of perspectives to get a better picture of the events currently unfolding. This includes philosophers, cultural anthropologists, policy makers, scientists as well as authors of science fiction. Each individual’s work intersects this core topic, but from unique angles. Lally is the author of the book The Air from Other Plane ...
 
The Daily Gardener is a gardening podcast that is published every weekday. Jennifer Ebeling shares thoughts and brevities to help you grow. She writes and records the show in her home studio in lovely Maple Grove, Minnesota. Show notes and additional information are available at thedailygardener.org
 
Still Growing is a weekly gardening podcast dedicated to helping you and your garden grow. Jennifer Ebeling is a home and garden blogger at 6ftmama.com & host of the Still Growing gardening podcast (available on iTunes & Stitcher Radio). Jennifer writes and records for the show in her home studio in lovely Maple Grove, Minnesota. You can read more about Jennifer on her About Page. You can contact her at Jennifer {at} 6ftmama.com.
 
Design Pro Success Stories are inspiring interviews with Architects, Landscape Architects and Interior Designers. We explore what it takes to be a successful Design Professional through the stories of the our guests. Where do they get their inspiration, who has influenced them, what choices have had the biggest affect on their career? How do they juggle the creative side and the need to run a profitable business? How do you find that balance everyone talks about between work and personal lif ...
 
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Have you ever intuited the name of a plant? A few years ago, I traveled to San Diego. I was sitting on a bench outside the hotel and I spied the most amazing blossom - three bright orange petals and three blue petals - it looked like the head of a bird. My mind latched onto "bird of paradise," I looked it up on my phone and sure enough, it was ...…
 
Take two gardeners. They grow up learning to garden from the same person. They read the same books on gardening. They go to the same gardening workshops. They tour the same public gardens. Yet, their gardens will look different from each other. Unique. Gardens are art. They are personal. Remember that the next time you are trying to copy the lo ...…
 
You know the saying bad things come in threes? The dishwasher stops working. You get in a car accident. Your credit card gets stolen. Well, when it comes to our plants; like us, they can be experiencing a constellation of problems as well. Yet, we often see plants as far less complex; minimizing their needs to a singular solution. "It just need ...…
 
Deep dives. Gardeners love to fall in love with particular plants. We can fall so hard, that we tune out other possibilities for our gardens. Then, in a fascinating twist, our deep dives can suddenly stop. As is often the case, those deep dives can be followed by a pivot. I started out as a shrub gardener. Then, I made a pivot to annuals and or ...…
 
We are on the cusp of continuous warm nights. Warm soil temps will take a few more weeks. Recently, I had a gardener ask me about their hearty hibiscus that was planted last year. They were worried it wasn't coming back; they didn't see any sign of life yet. In Minnesota, gardeners often start to freak out a bit if they don't see signs of life ...…
 
Today is National Garden Meditation Day. Forget about your troubles Go to the garden (if you're not there already). Feel the breeze or the sprinkles. Smell the rain. Look at all the signs of life around you... all the shades of green emerging from the ground. Listen to the sound of spring. Garden time is restorative and resetting. Use #GardenMe ...…
 
Ah May... the Month of Plant Sales. When I started gardening, I would Plant Sale away my Saturdays in May with my dear friend Judy. We would plan our way to a successful sale day, waking up while it was still dark out. Then we'd arrive at the church or the building where the sale was to be held, we'd set up our lawn chairs at the door, and we'd ...…
 
Happy May Day! Today, the tradition in France is to give a sprig of Lily of the Valley to loved ones. Originally from Japan, Lily of the Valley has long been considered lucky. It's sweet scent, belies it's high toxicity. Other names for Lily of the Valley include May Bells, Our Lady's Tears, and Mary's Tears. The French name, muguet, is a dimin ...…
 
I realize you are very excited to get going in your own garden. But don't forget to schedule some time this spring to visit other gardens. The gardens of friends, neighbors, or public gardens can provide you with inspiration and teach you something new - even when you didn't think you'd learn anything. #BTW This entire week, April 27-May 4, is ...…
 
Merriam-Webster gives the following synonyms for the word perennial: abiding, enduring, perpetual, undying Those terms can give gardeners unrealistic expectations for their perennials. They're not eternal. They will eventually part ways with your garden. But, for as long as they can, your perennials will make a go of it. Returning to the garden ...…
 
How close are your earliest bloomers to your front door? Your crocus, snowdrops, iris, daffodils, tulips, forsythia, daphnes, and magnolias. When I redid my front garden last year, the designer had put all my earliest bloomers right near the front porch and walk. When I asked her reasoning, she reminded me of our long winters. Her advice was sp ...…
 
Today I learned how botanists used to say "hello" to each other. In the 1800's and 1900's, a common way for botanists to introduce themselves, often from the other side of the world, was to send each other plant specimens as the foundation for developing a relationship. When it comes to friendship, plants are icebreakers, communicators, and bin ...…
 
I recently had a gardener ask me about the first herb I'd ever grown. That would be chives. Chives, like many herbs, are so easy to grow. Plus, you get the cute purple puffball blossoms. I had a chef friend show me how she liked to cut off the flower. Then, she snipped a little triangle off of the bottom where the bloom comes together (like cut ...…
 
There's a soldier's prayer that goes, "Stay with me, God. The night is dark, The night is cold: my little spark Of courage dies. The night is long; Be with me, God, and make me strong. Dark. Cold. Long. It's easy to get so excited about the first nice days of spring. "It was 80 degrees today!" "It's going to be above 70 all next week!" Well, ho ...…
 
Children's book writer and illustrator Tasha Tudor (Books by this author) once said, It's exciting to see things coming up again, plants that you've had for 20 or 30 years. It's like seeing an old friend. This made me think of the old saying; Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver and the other gold. Perennials are old friends. Gold ...…
 
Does your garden have a signature plant? If you can't decide, maybe it's time to let your garden do the talking. Complete the following sentence: My garden has the perfect spot to grow....(fill in the blank). For instance, you may have the perfect spot to grow anemone. I remember going to my friend Carmen’s house in the spring. I came around th ...…
 
Do you have pet names for your plants? Amy the Amaryllis. Jerry the geranium. Once I bought some dahlias at a private plant sale. Before I drove away, I rolled down the window to ask for the sellers name; they’ve been my “Doris“ dahlias ever since. Doris and I have stayed in touch over the years, and I have to say; she’s as lovely as the bloom ...…
 
William Cullen Bryant wrote, “There is no glory in star or blossom till looked upon by a loving eye; There is no fragrance in April breezes till breathed with joy as they wander by.” That pretty much sums up what happens with the plants I’ve dubbed "double-takes". A double-take plant is the one you first ignore or blow off - but them something ...…
 
“The sun was warm but the wind was chill. You know how it is with an April day.” ~ Robert Frost April can be a challenging time in the garden. How many truly lovely Aprils does one get in a lifetime? I’d venture to say maybe five or six. Often, the gardens are too wet to get into; provided you could even get to them. Even with the rain, the sno ...…
 
William Kent wrote: "A garden is to be a world unto itself, it had better make room for the darker shades of feeling as well as the sunny ones.” I’ve usually think about my garden as my happy place. It’s a natural mood changer for me. But I remember one time when I was out in the garden with feelings of a definite darker shade. I was very pregn ...…
 
I was looking at the cute brass plant labels on the Target website the other day - I was trying to find the link to that adorable garden tote I was telling you about and I thought about the evolution of a gardener when it comes to using plant tags. First you start out needing the labels - is that dill? What does basil look like again? Then you ...…
 
How much do you care for your garden? Does your time and attention stay pretty constant throughout the season? If not, why not? What would your garden look like in August if you loved it then as much as you do now? What do you need to do to sustain a high level of care for your garden all season long? Fewer tomato or pepper plants? More raised ...…
 
Just when you thought you had winter beat… You thought wrong. Surprise. Unpredictable weather. Dicey temperatures. Gardeners need resilience. If Spring’s arrival is dashing your hope, start to look for the survivors in your garden. In your neighborhood. In your city. On your social media feed. Every Spring - no matter the conditions, there are ...…
 
Today’s thought is exactly that: How we think when we garden. Emerson wrote: Blame me not, laborious band, For the idle flowers I brought; Every aster in my hand Comes back laden with a thought. How wonderful our gardens are for thinking. Creatively. Therapeutically. Soulfully. Every bloom can be a vessel for an idea, a hurt, a solution. I had ...…
 
Have you given much thought to the layout or shape of your garden beds? Do they follow the natural lines and slopes of the landscape? Are they geometric? Long beds with corners? Maybe you’ve tried a circle garden. If you’re just beginning - border beds - beds anchored by a backdrop (like a house or a fence) are the easiest to plan and execute. ...…
 
It’s decision time in the garden. What will your projects be this year? Often, we have no idea if our dreams for our gardens will come true. Gardeners may dream bigger dreams than emperors, but we can often get stuck, too. We put plants in the wrong spot. We buy the wrong thing. We spend too much money. We over do. But, every now and then we ge ...…
 
Have you started to think about your garden in geographical terms? Aside from the zone you are gardening in, what are the micro-climates in your garden? Areas sheltered by trees, buildings or other structures may be warmer and ideal locations for less hardy plants. Low-lying areas may create boggy or marsh-like conditions - perfect for plants t ...…
 
As I was preparing for today’s show, I kept thinking about this quote from John Burrows: "... One's own landscape comes in time to be a sort of outlying part of himself; he has sowed himself broadcast upon it, and it reflects his own moods and feelings; he is sensitive to the verge of the horizon: cut those trees, he bleeds; mar those hills, an ...…
 
What are you curious about in your garden? What are you hoping to learn this season? You might be signed up for something you didn’t plan to learn. Maybe you’ve always been a flower gardener, but then somehow you discover the joy of growing your own garlic. Last year, you grew your own tomatoes to great success. This season you may question why ...…
 
It's the 1st of April - April Fools Day! April is derived from the word aperit- which means to open. Yet, every Prince fan, or northern gardener, knows that, sometimes it snows in April. So, April flowers should take heed; open at your own risk. Brevities April is National Pecan Month, Lawn and Garden Month, Fresh Celery Month, National Garden ...…
 
The show will start Monday, April 1st. The show is called The Daily Gardener. The Daily Gardener is a weekday show (M-F) - weekends are for rest, family, fun, & gardening! Shows are between 5 - 10 minutes in length. The format for the show begins with a brief monologue followed by brevities: #OTD commemorating people, places, and events in hort ...…
 
‘The Efficiency Paradox: What Big Data Can’t Do’. Edward Tenner is a distinguished scholar of the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and a visiting scholar in the Rutgers University Department of History. His essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal ...…
 
Perry Kulper, an architect and Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Michigan. He has recently published Pamphlet Architecture 34, ‘Fathoming the Unfathomable: Archival Ghosts and Paradoxical Shadows’ with Nat Chard. They are at work on a new book to be published by Routledge.
 
Dr. Catherine Bliss is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California San Francisco. Her research explores the sociology of race, gender and sexuality in science, medicine, and society. Today we’re discussing her book ‘Social by Nature, The Promise and Peril of Sociogenomics’. We discuss the relationships between our body's ge ...…
 
Brad is the Chair of the Landscape Architecture program at the University of Virginia. Brad is the co-author of the book ‘Responsive Landscapes’ with Justine Holzman. And co authored of the paper‘Designing Autonomy: Opportunities for New Wildness in the Anthropocene’ with Laura J. Martin, and Erle C. Ellis. This article is our jumping off point ...…
 
Today we discuss Chris's writings about augmented reality and cartography. Chris is a public servant within Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland Directorate, Northern Ireland Civil Service as well as a guest writer for San Francisco based Venture Beat.
 
Today is a conversation with Chris Pak who is a scholar of speculative literature. His research interests are in the ecological and environmental significance of stories of terraforming and pantropy , which is to say the modification of other planets and the modification of bodies to enable the habitation of otherwise uninhabitable environments ...…
 
Astrophysicist Adam Frank is a leading expert on the final stages of evolution for stars like the sun, and his computational research group at the University of Rochester has developed advanced supercomputer tools for studying how stars form and how they die. His most recent book is 'Light of the Stars, Alien Worlds and the Fate of the Earth'.…
 
Muchaneta Kap-fundee is founding editor-in-chief of FashNerd.com, which she co founded with Mano ten Napel in 2015. Fashnerd is one of the fastest growing digital magazines writing about fashion technology and wearables. www.Fashnerd.com
 
Today is a conversation with Ian Bogost. Dr. Ian Bogost is an author and an award-winning game designer. He is Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he also holds an appointment in the Scheller College of Business. Bogost is also Founding Part ...…
 
This week is with Paola Antonelli - MoMA's Senior Curator of Architecture & Design + Director of R&D. We’re discussing her new show ‘Broken Nature’ for the upcoming XXII Triennale di Milano. www.brokennature.org
 
Kiel Moe is a practicing architect and Sheff Professor of Architecture at McGill University, and author of 8 books. We’re discussing his most recent book Empire, State and Building. The book plots the material history and geography for one plot of land in Manhattan – the parcel of land under the Empire State Building – over the past two hundred ...…
 
This week is a conversation with architects Rania Ghosn & El Hadi Jazairy about 'Geostories - Another Architecture for the Environment'.
 
This week is a conversation with the architect Filip Tejchman about the recent book by Michael Pollan 'How to Change Your Mind, What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression and Transcendence'.
 
Rob DeSalle is curator at the American Museum of Natural History & author of 'Our Senses, An Immersive Experience'.
 
Today is a conversation with Bryan Norwood who recently guest edited Log 42 (winter/spring 2018) entitled “Disorienting Phenomenology.” Bryan Norwood is completing his PhD at Harvard University in the History and Theory of Architecture. For more visit www.seanlally.net
 
This episode is a conversation about the work of the author Ursula Le Guin with Sing Yun Lee and Francis Gene-Rowe (both members of The London Science Fiction Research Community)
 
This week is a conversation with philosopher Graham Harman. We talk about his introduction of Object Oriented Ontology (or OOO) and it’s potential influence on the discipline of architecture. (photo credit: SciArc)
 
Luke Ruggenberg is on the show today. Luke is the author of Twenty Reasons Not To Garden (And Why I Ignore Them All) and it was that clever book title that lead me to buy Luke’s book and then track him down on Twitter and get him to be a guest on the show. Luke has worked in horticulture for quite some time. He’s currently the plant manager at ...…
 
Mario Carpo is the Reyner Banham Professor of Architectural History and Theory at the Bartlett, UCL, London & author of the article “Post-Digital “Quitters”: Why the Shift Toward Collage Is Worrying”. His latest monograph is, The Second Digital Turn: Design Beyond Intelligence, has just been published by the MIT Press.…
 
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