show episodes
 
A history podcast with a twist: Friendly Fire uses war movies as a point of entry on not only the history of war, but the history of how societies think about war. John Roderick, Adam Pranica and Benjamin Ahr Harrison dissect movies from throughout the history of cinema, talk about film production, pedantic quibbles with costumes and airplanes, and keep you laughing the entire time.
 
An encyclopaedia of heroic failure Join Ben Van der Velde, Barry McStay and their guests as they brandish their wooden spoons of destiny and celebrate the losers, heroic failures and spectacular mis-steps that pockmark human endeavour. If you ever want to feel better about your progress in life, take a listen and enjoy a lovely schadenfreude bubble bath. Music by Max Perryment (www.maxperryment.co.uk) Donate to us via Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/WorstFootForward
 
Listen to “The African History Network Show” with Michael Imhotep founder of The African History Network on 910 AM The Superstation WFDF in Detroit on Sundays, 9pm-11pm EST with host Michael Imhotep. CALL IN WITH Questions/Comments at (313) 778-7600. POST YOUR COMMENTS. WE MAY READ THEM ON AIR. Listen to The African History Network Show with Michael Imhotep, Sundays, 9pm-11pm EST on 910 AM in Detroit or around the world online at www.910AMSuperstation.com or by downloading the 910AM App to y ...
 
You Must Remember This is a storytelling podcast exploring the secret and/or forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. It’s the brainchild and passion project of Karina Longworth (founder of Cinematical.com, former film critic for LA Weekly), who writes, narrates, records and edits each episode. It is a heavily-researched work of creative nonfiction: navigating through conflicting reports, mythology, and institutionalized spin, Karina tries to sort out what really happened behind the ...
 
Past Present brings together three historians to discuss what's happening in American politics and culture today. Natalia, Neil, and Niki bring historical insights to the news of the day, offering listeners an alternative to the reflexive and polarized world of punditry. Interested in the world around you but exhausted by rote reactions and partisan talking points? You've come to the right place.
 
In each episode of In The Past Lane, the history podcast, we take up topics in American history and explore them through feature pieces, interviews, book and film reviews, and more. Our guiding philosophy is that history is not just about the past - it's about our world, here and now. History explains why things are the way they are, everything from our economy, religious practices, and foreign policy, to political ideology, family structure, and rates of poverty. Our aim is to be both infor ...
 
A podcast about how to build a career in filmmaking. No Film School shares the latest opportunities and trends for anyone working in film and TV. We break news on cameras, lighting, and apps. We interview leaders in screenwriting, directing, cinematography, editing, and producing. And we answer your questions! We are dedicated to sharing knowledge with filmmakers around the globe, “no film school” required.
 
Black Men Can't Jump [In Hollywood] is a comedic podcast that reviews films with leading actors of color and analyzes them in the context of race and Hollywood's diversity issues. Hosted by Jonathan Braylock, Jerah Milligan, and James III. BMCJ is an iTunes Editor's Choice podcast and has reached #2 on the iTunes Film/TV charts. BMCJ has also been covered by multiple websites including Huffington Post, Splitsider, Salon, The Daily Dot, and more. Produced by the Forever Dog Podcast Network.
 
Collider is the ultimate entertainment platform for the true fan, providing access to the most engaging movie, television, and gaming content from a host of trusted social influencers. Every week Collider will be providing new episodes of content from all their shows on this Factory feed. Subscribe here to get our latest movie reviews, takes on the breaking news from the industry, film commentaries, editorials, and our weekly film podcast hosted by Collider.com Senior Film Editor Matt Goldberg.
 
Technoculture explores how digital technology influences our lives, our experiences, and ultimately what it means to be human today. The host, Federica Bressan, interviews world class experts in the fields of technology, art, and science. Topics range from cybersecurity to film restoration, from virtual reality to audiobooks.
 
Comedian and actor Gilbert Gottfried, a man Stephen King once called “a national treasure,” talks with the show business legends, icons and behind-the-scenes talents who shaped his childhood and influenced his comedy. Along with co-host and fellow pop culture fanatic Frank Santopadre, Gilbert is joined by comics, actors, musicians, talk show hosts, writers and other eyewitnesses to Hollywood history, including Bruce Dern, Chevy Chase, “Weird Al” Yankovic, Adam West, Steve Buscemi, Micky Dole ...
 
A deep dive into the mysterious and peculiar happenings that occurred during the filming of the legendary film Psycho. Mark Ramsey Media and Wondery create a magical mix of fact and fiction which transports you into the world of Hitchcock. Psycho is among the greatest thrillers in movie history--and it nearly didn't happen!
 
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show series
 
In 1927, the Hollywood stars (and spouses), Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr stood outside their California home, arms raised in fascist salute. The photo’s caption, referencing the couple’s trip to Rome the previous year, informs fans that the couple “greet guests at their beach camp in true Italian style.” How did “America’s sweetheart” an…
 
This week we look at some some of the "firsts" in film history as they occurred in the Lumiere's early projections. We also describe a few advancements in film technology, including the Latham Loop, and the Geneva Drive. I have had to take the website down for a little while. There were just too many tech-issues. But you can still listen at history…
 
Professor Steven Fielding explains Churchill myths in film and television from Mission to Moscow (1943) to Darkest Hour (2017), and everything in between! The new book, “The Churchill Myths” is available on the Buzzkill Bookshelf. Episode #378. Our listeners get a free trial at The Great Courses Plus! Click here to go to thegreatcoursesplus.com/buz…
 
Roland Barthes and Film: Myth, Eroticism and Poetics (Bloomsbury) is a book by Patrick Ffrench, Professor of French at Kings College. It is a comprehensively researched and finely argued book that traces Barthes engagement with questions of cinema from early research pre-dating the publication of Mythologies to his last work, Camera Lucida, along t…
 
The episode technology didn'y want you to hear! Or at least Skype.Yes, Andrew and Dave are back! This time, the podcasting duo are taking a look at John Frankenheimer's 52 PICK-UP, the 1986 adaptation of the Elmore Leonard novel of the same name! Is this the sleaziest film the duo have covered since FEAR CITY? How fantastic are Clarence William III…
 
In this episode, we discuss the essential work of Jonas Mekas, author of the Cinema Journal column in the Village Voice, founder of the Anthology Film Archives, and torchbearer for experimental cinema.If you have any questions or comments, feel free to drop us a line at importantcinemaclubpodcast@gmail.comwww.patreon.com/theimportantcinemaclub…
 
Millie Bobby Brown gives a radiant lead performance in "Enola Holmes," one of several movies we review this week on Breakfast All Day. Besides the Netflix adventure, Christy, Matt and Alonso discuss Miranda July's latest, the strange, sweet and singular "Kajillionaire," and “Misbehaviour,” based on the true story of the feminist rebellion that shoo…
 
In this week's episode, Dennis Tzeng is joined by Josh Weyers and Dorian Parks to discuss Microsoft buying Bethesda and what it means for games and franchises like Elder Scrolls, Fallout, Starfield, Doom, Wolfenstein and whether they will be exclusives to Xbox. Also debating whether or not Sony owners have the right to complain if they become exclu…
 
Charles Stratton, who would become world famous as “Tom Thumb” in the mid-19th century, was born in Bridgeport, CT on January 4, 1838 to parents of average height, and he grew normally during the first six months of his life -- to about 25 inches or so. And then, surprisingly, he just stopped growing. When P.T. Barnum, the master showman, would mee…
 
Mark and Simon are joined by Ron Howard who talks about Rebuilding Paradise.Plus your essential streaming film reviews including Channing Godfrey Peoples’ drama Miss Juneteenth about a former beauty queen and single mother preparing her rebellious teenage daughter for the "Miss Juneteenth" pageant, Henry Golding as Kit, a British Vietnamese man, re…
 
Necessary Blackness Podcast received the distinction of being present at #FBAC2020. Rahiem Shabazz had the honor of speaking to the sold-out crowd mass incarceration, the war on drugs, and the connection between slavery, capitalism, and the prison industrial complex, all of which are discussed in his award-winning documentary series, “Elementary Ge…
 
The Treaty of York formalized the border between England and Scotland on this day in 1237. / On this day in 1886, Peter "Black Prince" Jackson won the Australian Heavyweight Boxing Championship, becoming the first Black man to win a national boxing crown. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers…
 
In our second episode on Monasteries we're talking about Carthusians, millenarian religiosity, the co-option of radicalism by the mainstream, baroque splendour, Slow TV, retirement bungalows and whether Jesus owned the shirt on his back. In this episode we attempt to delve into the way that monastery buildings facilitate true Monastic obedience, an…
 
dWho Wrote That?: Authorship Controversies from Moses to Sholokhov (Northern Illinois University Press) is Harvard historian Donald Ostrowski’s sustained reflection on what we can learn from comparison of authorship controversies. Ostrowski covers nine different cases of disputed authorship, from the Shakespeare canon, to the letters between the Ru…
 
What was the Cold War that shook world politics for the second half of the twentieth century? Standard narratives focus on Soviet-American rivalry as if the superpowers were the exclusive driving forces of the international system. Lorenz M. Lüthi, Associate Professor of History at McGill University in his new book Cold Wars: Asia, the Middle East,…
 
What are the African Middle Ages? A place, certainly, and a time period, evidently. But also a “documentary regime,” argues François-Xavier Fauvelle. How do we reconstruct these centuries of the African past in the face of a daunting lack of sources? In thirty-four thoughtful vignettes, Fauvelle takes us along for the ride as he wrestles with this …
 
Karl Gerth’s new book, Unending Capitalism: How Consumerism Negated China's Communist Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2020) details how the state created brands, promoted and advertised particular products, set up department stores, and facilitated the promotion of certain luxury consumer products (notably wristwatches, bicycles, and sewing…
 
In 2017, We Charge Genocide: The Crime of Government Against the Negro People, the historic petition authored by William L. Patterson, was published in its third edition. It has been nearly 70 years since Patterson, who passed away in 1980, and Paul Roberson, who passed away in 1976, presented the petition to the United Nations General Assembly, ch…
 
In his compelling evaluation of Cold War popular culture, Pulp Vietnam: War and Gender in Cold War Men’s Adventure Magazines (Cambridge UP, 2020), Gregory Daddis explores how men's adventure magazines helped shape the attitudes of young, working-class Americans, the same men who fought and served in the long and bitter war in Vietnam. The 'macho pu…
 
In 1927, the Hollywood stars (and spouses), Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr stood outside their California home, arms raised in fascist salute. The photo’s caption, referencing the couple’s trip to Rome the previous year, informs fans that the couple “greet guests at their beach camp in true Italian style.” How did “America’s sweetheart” an…
 
In his compelling evaluation of Cold War popular culture, Pulp Vietnam: War and Gender in Cold War Men’s Adventure Magazines (Cambridge UP, 2020), Gregory Daddis explores how men's adventure magazines helped shape the attitudes of young, working-class Americans, the same men who fought and served in the long and bitter war in Vietnam. The 'macho pu…
 
Jason Wood (Director of Film) Rachel Hayward (Head of Film) and Andy Willis (Senior Visiting Curator) discuss our upcoming programme of films in October. Featured are: St Maud, I Am Greta, Shirley and Mogul Mowgli, as well as our upcoming Film Fear season and the BFI London Film Festival. For more information on our entire programme and to book you…
 
https://nc.thenccs.org/donate-blackpantherThis week, The Cine-Files is breaking their most important rule to honor a man who’s real life was as heroic as the characters he played on the big screen. Black Panther is only a few years old but we it’s cultural impact is unmistakable and helping us explore that impact, we are proud to welcome Jay Washin…
 
James, Jerah, and Jonathan take a short break to check in with each other and chat with Haesue Jo, a licensed therapist and clinical support lead at Betterhelp. THIS EPISODE IS SPONSORED BY BETTERHELP For 10% off, visit https://www.betterhelp.com/jump Listen to Black Men Can't Jump [In Hollywood] Ad-Free on Forever Dog Plus: http://foreverdogpodcas…
 
Gregory Crewdson's large-scale, cinematic photos have been compared to the work of filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchcock and David Lynch. His latest exhibition - "An Eclipse of Moths" - is currently on display in L.A. Inspired by Crewdson's work, Adam and Josh - along with Crewdson himself - share their Top 5 Landscapes as Characters. Plus, thoughts …
 
Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show on 9-25-20 discussed a new report that found, Racism has cost the US Economy $16 Trillion over 20 years; Racism hurts everyone. "America could have been $16 trillion richer if not for inequities in education, housing, wages and business investment between Black and White Americans over the pa…
 
It's the beginning of the end for the Allied defense of Burma. While Gen. Slim's men are pushed back, their Chinese Allies in the Shan States of Eastern Burma are set upon and scattered.. Their remnants head back to China. Still, Gen. Slim wants to stay and fight and plans to build on Gen. Joseph Stilwell's string of victories, but even these can n…
 
This week: unions and studios come together on a new COVID-19 production agreement, Hulu tries their hand at deep fakes (with rather successful results), and Canon announces the ultimate small cinema camera (Charles Haine is beside himself). Also, in light of RBG's supreme court seat vacancy... we get political. Read more: Canon's C70 is a Fresh Ta…
 
He might not be King of the World, but James Cameron is the King of Sequels. Listen as Brandon and Thomas discuss the life and works of Academy Award-winning director James Cameron. For this episode, Brandon and Thomas enlisted the help of Chris Winterbauer and Lizzie Bassett, hosts of the What Went Wrong podcast, to join them in their James Camero…
 
Following the high-profile deaths of eighteen-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and twenty-five-year-old Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, both cities erupted in protest over the unjustified homicides of unarmed black males at the hands of police officers. These local tragedies—and the protests surrounding them—assumed national signi…
 
After his father died, James L. Nolan, Jr., took possession of a box of private family materials. To his surprise, the small secret archive contained a treasure trove of information about his grandfather’s role as a doctor in the Manhattan Project. Dr. Nolan, it turned out, had been a significant figure. A talented ob-gyn radiologist, he cared for …
 
Stephanie Newell, Professor of English at Yale University, came to this project, which explores the concept of “dirt” and how this idea is used and applied to people and spaces, in a rather indirect way, having read the memoirs and journals of merchant traders – particularly the white British traders who were writing about their visits to many of t…
 
Chhaya Goswami’s Globalization Before Its Time: The Gujarati Merchants from Kachchh (Penguin Random House India) asks: How did the Kachchhi traders build on the Gujarat Advantage? In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, during the dying days of the Mughal empire, merchants from Kachchh established a flourishing overseas trade. Building on…
 
My Lai, Wounded Knee, Sandy Hook: the place names evoke grief and horror, each the site of a massacre. Massacres-the mass slaughter of people-might seem as old as time, but the word itself is not. It worked its way into the English language in the late sixteenth century, and ultimately came to signify a specific type of death, one characterized by …
 
After his father died, James L. Nolan, Jr., took possession of a box of private family materials. To his surprise, the small secret archive contained a treasure trove of information about his grandfather’s role as a doctor in the Manhattan Project. Dr. Nolan, it turned out, had been a significant figure. A talented ob-gyn radiologist, he cared for …
 
My Lai, Wounded Knee, Sandy Hook: the place names evoke grief and horror, each the site of a massacre. Massacres-the mass slaughter of people-might seem as old as time, but the word itself is not. It worked its way into the English language in the late sixteenth century, and ultimately came to signify a specific type of death, one characterized by …
 
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