×
Giant Dwarf public
[search 0]
×
Best Giant Dwarf podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Giant Dwarf podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Big Head Mode is a weekly radio show on Sydney's 2RRR 88.5FM, where Ben O'Brien and various guest co-hosts discuss the latest gaming news, reviews, features, interviews and everything in between. Check out the website to get all the latest episodes, videos and details of 'Bonus Stage', a live video game talk show that's on every month at Sydney's Giant Dwarf Theatre.
 
"And now, mamma, until your tea is ready, we know what you must do," said the children, in a breath. "Tell us a story—a 'real, truly' fairy tale, about a giant and a dwarf, lots and lots of fairies, a prince and a beautiful princess with hair to her very feet, a champion with a magic sword, a dragon-chariot, a witch dressed in snake-skin—and, if you can, an ogre. Don't punish anybody but the witch and the ogre; and please don't have any moral, only let everybody 'live in peace and die in a p ...
 
The sleeping beauty in the wood -- Hop-O'-My-Thumb -- Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper -- Adventures of John Dietrich -- Beauty and the Beast -- Little One Eye, Little Two Eyes, and Little Three Eyes -- Jack the giant-killer -- Tom Thumb -- Rumpelstilzchen -- Fortunatus -- The Bremen Town Musicians -- Riquet with the tuft -- House Island -- Snow-White and Rose-Red -- Jack and the bean-stalk -- Graciosa and Percinet -- The iron stove -- The invisible prince -- The woodcutter's daughte ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
The home galaxy of a second repeating fast radio burst is a puzzle Astronomers have traced a mysterious, recurrent blast of radio waves to a Milky Waylike galaxy The first galaxy discovered to host a repeating fast radio burst was a tiny dwarf galaxy.
 
SARS and the new coronavirus target the same cellular lock to infect cells Lab studies are revealing more details about the novel pathogen The new coronavirus (small circles shown in this electron micrograph) spreading in China and several other countries uses the same cellular protein as SARS to gain access to cells.…
 
Color-changing fibers help reveal mysteries of how knots work A few simple rules can explain why some knots are stronger than others Color-changing fibers reveal areas with high strain (yellow and green) in a knot.
 
Scientists question White House measures to limit spread of coronavirus The risk of contracting the virus in the United States is still low Seven cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in the United States.
 
Healthy babies exposed to Zika in the womb may suffer developmental delays A small group of toddlers in Colombia missed milestones for movement and social interaction Neurologist Sarah Mulkey (left) assesses a 5-month-old baby in Colombia who was exposed to the Zika virus in the womb.
 
A new roadmap shows how the U.S. could be carbon-neutral by 2050 Reaching zero carbon emissions by 2050 requires heavy investment in technology, starting now Tree restoration, such as adding a managed forest canopy to shelter crops (shown), is part of a new report's roadmap for the United States to become carbon-neutral by 2050.…
 
Ocean acidification may not make fish act weird after all New research upends earlier work on how ocean acidification might affect reef fish behavior Damselfishes swim on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.
 
The wobbling orbit of a pulsar proves Einstein right, yet again New observations of 'frame dragging' help reveal details of the final days of a pair of stars A white dwarf (illustrated, center) twists spacetime as it spins, forcing the orbit (pink) of a neighboring pulsar (illustrated with radio jets) to wobble.…
 
Global progress in combating child malnutrition masks problem spots Only 28 of 105 low- to mid-income countries are set to meet WHO's 2025 hunger-reduction targets Childhood malnutrition has been falling worldwide, but success is uneven, a new study shows.
 
These are the most detailed images of the sun ever taken Largest solar telescope in the world shows boiling plasma on the solar surface Boiling plasma on the sun's surface and bright spots (seen in the dark lanes between plasma bubbles) at the roots of solar magnetic fields take center stage in a new solar telescope's first images (one shown, spann…
 
Stick-toting puffins offer the first evidence of tool use in seabirds Two birds observed four years and a sea apart turned sticks into feather scratchers Annette Fayet snapped this photo of an Atlantic puffin on Skomer Island in Wales in 2012.
 
Russian foxes bred for tameness may not be the domestication story we thought A new study challenges the friendly foxes' history and the validity of 'domestication syndrome' This image shows a dark-furred, silver fox similar to the variety bred for tameness in a famous, long-running experiment in Russia.…
 
An astrophysicist honors citizen scientists in the age of big data The Crowd and the Cosmos examines the role of amateurs in science The Pinwheel Galaxy, shown in this Hubble Space Telescope image, is an example of a spiral galaxy.
 
A bioethicist says scientists owe clinical trial volunteers support Many insurance policies don't cover experimental procedures or side effects that can follow Researchers and clinical trial volunteers need to fully understand the risks volunteers face from experimental procedures, a bioethicist says.…
 
Climate change is bringing earlier springs, which may trigger drier summers Longer growing seasons mean more soil moisture is lost through evapotranspiration, a study says Climate change is pushing spring's start earlier in the calendar year, allowing plants to grow for longer.
 
Misbehaving kaons could hint at the existence of new particles Certain extremely rare decays seem to be happening more often than expected New subatomic particles could explain a surprisingly large number of decays of particles called kaons seen in the KOTO experiment (detector shown).
 
The first glimpses of a pulsar's surface hint at complex magnetism Maps of the rapidly spinning neutron star could shed light on how high-density matter behaves The first maps of a pulsar reveal bright spots in its southern hemisphere where high-speed atomic particles, guided by magnetic fields, slam into the star.…
 
This material could camouflage objects from infrared cameras The coating flouts the typical trend of hotter objects radiating more light When heated from about 100° to 140° Celsius (left to right), a normal material (top) radiates more brightly, and an infrared camera registers a higher temperature (brighter colors).…
 
LIGO detects its second neutron star collision, but gains few clues With no accompanying flash of light found, astrophysicists have little to go on Two more neutron stars (illustrated) have been caught in the act of merging.
 
Collectors find plenty of bees but far fewer species than in the 1950s A look at global insect collections suggests bee diversity has dropped sharply since the 1990s A new study reports recent massive losses in bee diversity worldwide.
 
Bubble-blowing galaxies could help solve a cosmic mystery A trio of galaxies has been caught ionizing hydrogen 680 million years after the Big Bang Bubbles of ionized hydrogen surround three galaxies (illustrated) in the very early universe, perhaps providing a peek into how most of the hydrogen in the cosmos became ionized.…
 
The containers the U.S. plans to use for nuclear waste storage may corrode Groundwater exposure could cause the metal and glass binding the waste to break down New lab experiments uncover a potential vulnerability in canisters that the U.S. government plans to use for storing nuclear waste underground, possibly beneath Yucca Mountain in Nevada (pic…
 
Stem cell clinics' much-hyped treatments lack scientific support Patients are getting injections to relieve knee pain and more, with too little research on safety and effectiveness Stem cells can do promising things in the lab, but regenerative treatments for knee pain and other ailments offered by stem cell clinics are not supported by existing re…
 
Injecting a TB vaccine into the blood, not the skin, boosts its effectiveness The BCG vaccine is notoriously bad at preventing the most common form of tuberculosis PET-CT scans of rhesus monkey lungs show spots of TB infection and tissue inflammation (red and orange).
 
Scientists cooled a nanoparticle to the quantum limit The particle's motion reached the lowest level allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle Scientists cooled a nanoparticle in a specially designed cavity (shown), reaching the lowest temperature permitted by quantum mechanics.
 
How one woman became the exception to her family's Alzheimer's history Their story may point to new ways to stop the memory-robbing disease In Colombia, Oderis Villegas (center), who is showing signs of Alzheimer's, and his sister Maria Elsy (left), whose disease is more advanced, meet with neurologist Francisco Lopera (right) in this 2010 photo.…
 
Engineered honeybee gut bacteria trick attackers into self-destructing Special microbes mount steady gene-silencing attacks on mites or viruses A test of genetic sabotage offers new hope for fighting one of the biggest dangers to honeybee health, the small, disease-spreading, fat-sucking Varroa mite (seen clamped on the side of the nearest bee).…
 
50 years ago, scientists debated the necessity of a smallpox vaccine Excerpt from the January 31, 1970 issue of Science News Smallpox killed up to 500 million people before it was declared globally eradicated in 1980.
 
Fewer worms live in mud littered with lots of microplastics Scientists tracked how animals fared in the polluted sediment for over a year A new experiment on freshwater critters living in sediment with different amounts of microplastic contamination (pictured) shows that worms don't do well amidst many tiny bits of plastic.…
 
Here's how climate change may make Australia's wildfires more common Extreme wildfires down under are linked to a weather pattern that starts in the Indian Ocean A fire burns on January 4 in Lake Tabourie, Australia, about 200 kilometers south of Sydney.
 
How bacteria create flower art Physical interactions between different types of microbes form delicate floral patterns A mixed colony of strains of E. coli (colored green) and Acinetobacter baylyi (red) bacteria created this flower.
 
A new genetic analysis reveals that modern Africans have some Neandertal DNA too Humans migrating back to Africa brought extinct relatives' genetic material along for the ride Ancient Europeans, represented by a roughly 30,000-year-old French Homo sapiens skull shown at left, interbred with Neandertals, represented by a 70,000- to 50,000-year-old F…
 
Small 'cousins' of T. rex may actually have been growing teenagers Fossil analyses suggest that Nanotyrannus wasn't a diminutive kin of the more famous behemoth A dinosaur called Nanotyrannus (left in this illustration), once thought to be a smaller cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex (right), was probably a juvenile T. rex , a new study suggests.…
 
An experimental HIV vaccine failed a key trial in South Africa The vaccine did not reduce the risk of being infected with the virus that causes AIDS Participants in a clinical trial testing an experimental vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus, shown in blue, did not see a reduced risk of infection compared with those on placebo.…
 
Phosphorus, present in our DNA and cell membranes, is an essential element for life. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency’s probe Rosetta.…
 
Phosphorus, present in our DNA and cell membranes, is an essential element for life. But how it arrived on the early Earth is something of a mystery. Astronomers have now traced the journey of phosphorus from star-forming regions to comets using the combined powers of ALMA and the European Space Agency’s probe Rosetta.…
 
19 more galaxies mysteriously missing dark matter have been found The newly found outliers defy ideas of how these star systems evolve Most dwarf galaxies, like NGC 5477 seen in this image from the Hubble Space Telescope, have far more dark matter than normal everyday matter.
 
Wildfires could flip parts of the Amazon from a carbon sponge to a source by 2050 Curbing new deforestation could help avoid the alarming tipping point, simulations suggest Deforestation, along with greenhouse gas-caused climate change, could double the burned area of the southern Brazilian Amazon forest by 2050.…
 
The loss of 'eternal ice' threatens Mongolian reindeer herders' way of life Newly recorded oral histories of the Tsaatan people help researchers document climate change Reindeer (shown here in 2017) rely on eternal ice patches in Mongolia to cool themselves during the summer.
 
This ancient stardust is the oldest ever to be examined in a lab Tiny grains give insight into galactic happenings before our solar system's birth Bits of dust expelled by aging stars (like those in the Egg Nebula plume, pictured) and brought to Earth on a meteorite are the oldest ever dated in a lab.…
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login