Best Goshawk podcasts we could find (Updated April 2019)
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Satisfy your curiosity with the latest in science, space, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.
 
An approved Treatise of Hawkes and Hawking. Divided into three Bookes. The first teacheth, How to make a short-winged Hawke good, with good conditions. The second, How to reclaime a Hawke from any ill condition. The third teacheth. Cures for all knowne griefes and diseases. By Edmund Bert, Gentleman. The author, who lived at Collier Row, near Romford, Essex, details his method of training the Goshawk, in which he was very successful. He used to ride out of Essex into Sussex to hawk over the ...
 
The Burgess Bird Book for Children is a zoology book written in the form of a story featuring Peter Rabbit. Peter learns from his friend Jenny Wren all about the birds of North America, and we meet many of them in the Old Orchard, the Green Meadow, and the Green Forest. (summary by Laurie Anne Walden)
 
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One of the most distinguishing features of the British capital, London, is its many statuesque looking skyscrapers. Even more absorbing are the unique nicknames given to them. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Macaques are the most studied monkeys in the world, thanks to the efforts of scientists like Wolfgang Dittus. He arrived in Sri Lanka 50 years ago and has devoted his life to better understand theirs. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Chatsworth House, the historic home of the Cavendish family, is a vast estate that once spanned 35,000 acres. At one point, Chatsworth employed a staff of 40 people to maintain it - including two... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
After years of planning by over 200 international scientists, the data purported to show the first ever image of a black hole is ready. The team gathers for the big reveal - it's a seismic moment in... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
With a fancy fan of tail feathers, bright yellow eye combs and magnificent plumage, male sage grouses bring enough dazzle to their courtship displays to put a peacock to shame. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
An archive of the secret communications between Benedict Arnold and British army officers indirectly reference Arnold's wife, Peggy. It is the strongest clue yet that she may have been a pivotal... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
When Continental Airlines Flight 1713 crashed on November 15, 1987, it soon became clear to investigators that initial theories could not be backed up by evidence. They would have to wait for the... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A pair of hungry wolves come up with a smart plan to swindle the swamp bears away from their carrion. While one wolf distracts the bears, the other goes in and steals her fill. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
On October 7, 2008, passengers and crew on Qantas Airlines Flight 72 were pulled up from their seats. Immediately after, the plane went into a dangerous and uncontrolled nosedive. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A dominant brown bear - dubbed the 'Swamp King' - comes across a younger bear feasting on a kill. He immediately moves in - as the biggest and strongest around, he won't take a backseat to any rival. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In 1941, Naval Intelligence zero in on a Japanese spy named Itaru Tachibana. Raiding his room at the Olympic Hotel in Los Angeles reveals a stash of documents that outlined the extent of his... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In 1981, President Mitterrand of France took Ronald Reagan to one side and revealed an extraordinary intelligence operation. It was a revelation that would turn the Cold War on its head. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Despite its name, the Spanish Flu almost certainly didn't originate in Spain. In fact, it appears to have originated on the Midwestern prairies of Kansas. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In 2013, a wildlife cameraman from Norway, Asgeir Helgestad, met a polar bear mom whom he names Frost. Over the next few years, their paths would cross again. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Naked mole rats are able to live on low oxygen and can even survive without it - conditions that would kill most mammals. The big question is how have they evolved to do that? The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In 1692, an Indian slave in Massachusetts admitted to being an agent of Satan, and to casting spells on her master's family. This admission would kick off the horrific events known as the Salem witch... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Bahama feral pigs were once domestic pigs let loose by local farms. Through cunning and resourcefulness, they've continued to thrive in the wild - and fuel Bahaman tourism along the way. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Without access to the crash sites of MH17, which went down on July 17, 2014, investigators can't definitively say why the crash happened. So they begin to consider all kinds of theories - including a... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Since 1990, the National Wildlife Strike Database has reported more than 200,000 bird strikes on commercial planes. This data tells us when planes are most vulnerable to these types of collisions. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A fishing trawler may seem like an easy target for a powerful U.S. submarine - but these were the early days of the Pacific War, and even Japanese civilian boats were armed to the teeth. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
When Boudica's forces destroyed the Temple of Claudius, the devastation was ruinous. Ironically, the fire actually helped preserve many of the contents - often to a level that astonishes modern... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Why did TransAsia Flight 222 veer off course and crash a mile short of Magong Airport? An examination of the wreckage doesn't provide the answer - but it does convince investigators to rule one... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Marilyn Monroe's breathless rendition of 'Happy Birthday, Mr. President' in 1962, has passed into legend. But it was her silk dress that would go on to become a priceless piece of Marilyn memorabilia. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
On September 9, 1980, the MV Derbyshire went down in the Pacific Ocean - the largest British ship ever lost at sea. A team of investigators send down a remote vehicle camera to find out what happened. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Controversy surrounds the exact origins of yoga, but Dr. Jim Mallinson has been studying the practice for years and he has some interesting insight on the true origins. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
When a baby is born surgically via C-section, it may miss out on the health benefits of passing through the birth canal. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Catching a sloth is no mean feat, as sloth researcher Bryson Voirin will attest as he chases Blaze the sloth through the canopy. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
After the defeat in Cannae, Rome was in a state of panic and social disorder. To restore calm, Rome's ruler, Quintus Fabius Maximus, resorted to drastic and cruel measures. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Jack the Ripper managed to commit his violent murders and escape without ever once being seen. Actually, he may have been spotted at one of his crime scenes. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Psamtik I was believed to be a minor Egyptian pharaoh. But in 2017, an exquisite statue of him was uncovered, suggesting his status and importance in history may need to be revisited. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A Japanese torpedo attack against the USS Indianapolis leaves the men with no time to launch lifeboats. For four grueling days, the survivors float helplessly in the Pacific Ocean. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
It's a big day for the 23-year-old junior officer of the MSC Oscar: he's bringing in the giant vessel to port for the first time in his career - a tricky maneuver in a narrow waterway known for its... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
The priests of Amun held an elevated position in ancient Egypt. But modern archaeologists were stunned to discover that a group of women were even more important - they were dubbed 'The Wives of... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A rock rat is hiding from his predator, a honey badger, in the midst of a Namibian sweet thorn tree. But he doesn't count on his opponent's determination to get lunch, even at the price of a few cuts. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
The success of Operation Hydra in decoding enemy messages handed the Allies a key advantage in the fight against deadly German U-boats. The hunted had become the hunters. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
The hagfish is a slime-emitting ocean-dweller that's remained unchanged for 300 million years--and it shows. It has a skull (but no spine), velvet smooth skin, and a terrifying pit of a mouth that's... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
It's December 1966, and a U.S. pilot is leading a squadron of six F-4 Phantoms on a dangerous bombing mission over North Vietnam. Every mile of their 100 mile route is dotted with North Vietnam's... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Ostrich eggs can weigh up to three pounds and have some of the hardest shells around. This honey badger, however, isn't about to let any of that get in the way of a tasty, protein-filled snack. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Prior to the arrival of Pocahontas in England, indigenous people of the Americas were viewed as cannibals, brutish, and non-Christian. Enter Pocahontas, who arrived in London, baptized and speaking... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
It's June 1945 and the USS Barb has just launched an unprecedented attack on the factories of the Japanese island of Shari. It's the first time that rockets have ever been launched from a submarine. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
When it comes to military transport, the A400M is in a class of its own: it has a 37 ton maximum payload, a fuel capacity of 16,000 gallons and the capacity to fly 5,500 miles without refueling. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
If a gelada queen doubts her king's influence, she'll happily play the field. But when she gets caught, it's up to the alpha to fight for what's his. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In the 1560s, Eric XIV of Sweden was determined to change the way naval battles were fought. The result was Mars: a giant of a warship that would rely on artillery and firepower to devastate her... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Ever since the deadly eruption of Mount Tarawera in 1886, New Zealand has invested heavily in a sophisticated warning system - all in an effort to prevent another major tragedy. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
A giraffe takes a long drink from a local watering hole, with watchful lions in close proximity. The giraffe isn't brave, just desperately thirsty, while the lions aren't lazy, they're just waiting... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
All mammals have hair--but is the naked mole rat an exception to the rule? A caretaker at Smithsonian's National Zoo gives us a closer look. #ZooQs The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
In a remarkable series of color films capturing pre-war Hawaii, an idyllic paradise is revealed. A few short years later, that illusion of paradise would be shattered by the attack on Pearl Harbor. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
It's November 1943 and a German U-boat has been brutally damaged in a fight with British warships and is limping its way to port. But the sub's onboard batteries are impaired - which means it can't... The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Hyena clans have a very strict social hierarchy. When two 18-month-old hyena brothers join a new clan, alpha male Bongo shows us how he establishes dominance. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
Bombing ground targets from the air is tricky and not always accurate. But a new type of bomb creates an unimaginable level of destruction - and strengthens U.S. attacks in the Pacific. The latest in science, culture, and history from Smithsonian Channel.By appsupport@smithsoniannetworks.com.
 
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