show episodes
 
Renaissance England was a bustling and exciting place...new religion! break with rome! wars with Scotland! And France! And Spain! The birth of the modern world! In this twice-monthly podcast I'll explore one aspect of life in 16th century England that will give you a deeper understanding of this most exciting time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
This is a history podcast and a story podcast in one (on facebook it's tudortimemachine} It's a secret history of the Elizabethan court set in 1565. Everyone thinks they know the truth of Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth, but we’re going to tell you about what we think really happened. The central characters are all based on real people from the court. After we read the story section, we’ll take a dive into history behind the episode. Fun! Our merch is here! https://tudor-time-machine.creator-sprin ...
 
Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks about everything from the Aztecs to witches, Velázquez to Shakespeare, Mughal India to the Mayflower. Not, in other words, just the Tudors, but most definitely also the Tudors. Each episode Suzannah is joined by historians and experts to reveal incredible stories about one of the most fascinating periods in history. You can also subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here > Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
University and College Professors have a reputation for being eccentric. This is a 5 episode play that agrees wholeheartedly with that description. One character believes he is the modern day version of King Henry VIII. Another character believes that logic and reason are answer to all problems, political and personal. Maybe eccentric is too mild a word.
 
I'm Lindsay Holiday and I'm spilling the Tea on history! Join me every Tuesday for a steaming cup of the juiciest stories you won't learn in history class. Topics include Queens of the world, Royalty and Women's history. https://www.youtube.com/c/lindsayholiday Help me make more podcasts and videos at: Patreon.com/LindsayHoliday Theme music: Baroque Coffee House by Doug Maxwell Please contact advertising@airwavemedia.com if you would like to advertise on this podcast. For other inquiries: Li ...
 
If you want to learn about Historic Royal Palaces then this is the podcast for you! Locked up in the Tower of London Annabel’s uncle is a Beefeater, one of the special Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London! He’s always telling her about the famous prisoners the Tower of London has held over the years so she’s taking us on a tour to check the place out for ourselves! Locked Up in The Tower of London is made possible with support from Historic Royal Palaces. The Secrets of Hampton Court Palace ...
 
This is Shakespeare's dutiful tribute to one of the most imposing and terrifying rulers in European history. The kingdom trembles as the giant monarch storms through his midlife crisis, disposing of the faithful Katharine of Aragon and starting a new life and, the king hopes, a line of succession with the captivating young Anne Bullen. Unlike his predecessors, Henry has no doubt about the security of his tenure on the throne, and dominates the royal court with absolute authority. The extent ...
 
A podcast where we talk about a little tidbit from history and mythology that is... super effed up. So sit back, relax, and practice your "oh good God what the F*(%" faces." Effed Up History is researched, written, produced, and edited by Krystina Yeager. For any inquiries, please email me at effeduphistory@gmail.com
 
"Why Didn't You Tell Me?" is a fun, open and honest look at how three young men who thought the stuff they were taught in school would prepare them to be successful, confident and stable young adults. Little did they know that Pythagoras theorem wouldn't help them buy houses and Henry VIII wouldn’t get them work experience. The transition into adulthood is abrupt and real world knowledge is the true key - so let’s shift the balance. This platform pokes fun, educates and inspires the next and ...
 
Historic Royal Palaces are a team of people who love and look after six of the most wonderful palaces in the world. This fortnightly podcast brings you the history and stories of those palaces. You’ll hear from our experts and the people who bring our palaces to life, as we create space to explore how history moves us, telling stories about the monarchs you know, and uncovering the lives and histories of the people you don’t. Just like our palaces, this podcast is a mix of old and new. Each ...
 
We are at a critical moment in history, where the 24/7 news cycle no longer just covers the story. It influences the story. Sometimes it IS the story. Do you love history and find the media maddening? #MeToo! “Top Story Tonight!” revisits great moments in history as if the modern media existed at the time - cable news, Twitter, Instagram, talk radio, reality TV, even the dark web of conspiracy theories. Imagine retelling the story of Cleopatra as the original Kim Kardashian on Instagram. Thi ...
 
This summer, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, is due to give birth to an heir to the throne. In this pair of lectures, leading historians explore how Tudor and Stuart monarchs begat children. We’ll go from throne to bedchamber, from weddings to ballads as we examine how Henry VIII’s fertility struggles and the scandal over the “warming pan baby” shed light on the history of fertility, pregnancy and childbirth in the British Isles. Lecture 1 Henry VIII: The Quest for an Heir, given by Peter J ...
 
What happens when two bawdy, Early Modern word-nerds sit down to talk about all things Shakespeare? You get "The Hurly Burly Shakespeare Show!": an irreverent mix of entertainment and scholarly content suitable for novices and hard-core “Bardolaters” alike. Jess (The Scholar) and Aubrey (The Teaching Artist) discuss the plays of William Shakespeare and his contemporaries, as well as other fascinating aspects of the Early Modern period’s lively theatre and print culture. “The Hurly Burly Shak ...
 
A poor young boy from the slums of London watches a royal procession pass, with the youthful Prince of Wales riding at its head. He ventures too close and is caught and beaten by the Prince's guards. However, the young royal stops them and invites the vagrant to the palace. Here the two boys sup alone and are stunned to discover that they bear a startling resemblance to each other. The Prince is Edward, long awaited heir of the monarch, Henry VIII, while the vagrant is Tom Canty, the son of ...
 
A nutritionist and a yoga instructor get together to talk about nutrition and wellness trends throughout history--from the unique to the disturbing to the effective. Join us as we journey through time and discover the unusual and, at times, crazy side of wellness and nutrition through the lens of history.
 
A podcast for enthusiasts about firearms, history, museums, and more, with a goal of providing an understanding of what it’s like to work with these items in an environment that is becoming less and less accepting of the scholarship and work being done in this field. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/highcaliberhistory/support
 
Podcasts from the 8th Annual Tudor and Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference which took place on August 24-25 2018 at the Graduate School, Queen's University Belfast. The 8th Tudor and Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference was generously supported by the School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics, the School of Arts, English and Languages, and the Institute of Irish Studies, Queen's University, Belfast, and Marsh's Library. Podcasting by Real Smart Media in associat ...
 
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show series
 
Our winter break is officially over and we hope you did your homework because Dr. Yasmine Hachimi joins us to talk about Henry VIII (the man, and sometimes Shakespeare’s play) and his most infamous wife, Anne Boleyn. In this longer-than-usual conversation we focus on the Netflix miniseries Blood, Sex, and Royalty, but also several other TV series a…
 
In April 1538 - to celebrate the birth of Prince Edward and the 30th anniversary of his reign - King Henry VIII began work on a royal palace in Surrey, designed to be unequalled as a celebration of the power and the grandeur of the Tudor dynasty: Nonsuch Palace. Henry spared no expense on the estate, spending nine years and £7.4 million in today’s …
 
This week is the penultimate episode in our six-part mini-series and today we are in for a treat! Curatorial placement student Cara Gathern takes us into one of the most exciting but hidden spaces at Hampton Court Palace, Henry VIII’s bedroom. It may not look like a royal Tudor bedroom today, but Cara will reveal how this space has transported her …
 
Today on Art of History, I am beyond thrilled to bring you two episodes of a show that has quickly become a staple in my daily podcast listening: History Daily. Every weekday, host Lindsay Graham (American Scandal, American History Tellers) takes you back in time to explore a momentous event that happened ‘on this day’ in history. Whether it’s to r…
 
Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) was an influential diplomat and political activist, an outstanding patron of philosophers and artists, an accomplished writer and poet, and sister to King François I of France. She has been described as the “Mother of the Renaissance in France”. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb fi…
 
Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom was known as the grandmother of Europe. She and her husband Prince Albert had 9 children, 42 grandchildren, 85 great-grandchildren and 142 great-great-grandchildren. Many of her majesty’s estimated 1,239 total descendants married into royal families across Europe, from Russia to Spain, Norway to Romania and all …
 
It only took us 4 years, but we have finally circled back to Love’s Labour’s Lost for a deep dive into what some fussy Victorians - Hazlitt and Tennyson - had to say about the play, plus a little bit about the moral implications of the ladies’ “homework” for the boys at the play’s conclusion. There also may or may not be some extensive bird walking…
 
This week we are joined by the Historian, Author and Executive Director of the Juno Beach Centre, Alex Fitzgerald-Black and he is raging that D-DAY IS NOT THE LARGEST INVASION IN HISTORY. We’ll be talking specifics about where Overlord fits into the scale of invasions, amphibious operations and Combined Operations, we’ll also be talking the importa…
 
In 1618, almost 100 impoverished children from London - some as young as eight - arrived in Jamestown, Virginia to labour in the growing colony. It was the first example of transporting children to colonies that would continue into the twentieth century. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb finds out more from Dr. Deb…
 
Miss Perkins travels to Washington to become Madam Secretary - and the architect of The New Deal. Her ferocious battles with the status quo during these years later led President Kennedy to call her "one of the most controversial, dangerous figures who ever roamed the United States." See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Pr…
 
Part II of Edmonia Lewis' story takes us for a closer look at her masterpiece: the 1876 sculpture, 'Death of Cleopatra.' In an echo of Edmonia’s approach to her own biography, the work shows Egypt’s last queen “sealing her fate and having the last word on how she’ll be recorded in history.” Today's Image: Edmonia Lewis, Death of Cleopatra (1876). M…
 
In the cut-throat world of the Elizabethan court, Sir Christopher Hatton became one of Elizabeth I’s favourites. After catching her eye in 1561, Hatton was quickly promoted to the Privy Council, making a significant impact on Elizabeth’s complex religious policy. Yet Hatton has often been overshadowed by such Tudor heavyweights as Dudley, Cecil and…
 
This week we’re back with the final episode from our mini-series on spaces we love in our palaces and what a way to end! Chief Curator Tracy Borman has chosen to take us into a room that isn’t open to visitors, but that witnessed two momentous moments in Tudor history; the birth of Henry VIII’s long-awaited heir, and the death of his beloved wife J…
 
Assassination – the murder of a prominent person, often for political motives. These calamities shock the world and can change the course of history. But as we will learn from the following shocking accounts, violence can only beget more violence. And the aspirations of assassins have a tendency to backfire, sending political causes flailing backwa…
 
This week we are joined by the Professor of Social and Community History at the University of Birmingham and author of “Peaky Blinders: The Real Story”, Carl Chinn. Carl joins Paul and Kyle to rage that THE PEAKY BLINDERS ARE NEITHER GLAMOROUS, ORGANISED OR EDWARDIAN. We’ll be talking about the crimes they committed and against who, how they stem f…
 
In 1628, a Dutch East India flagship called Batavia set sail from the Netherlands, never to reach her destination. Eight months into the voyage, the ship was wrecked on coral reef off the western coast of Australia. What then befell her surviving crew and passengers was horrifying and tragic. It has been described as “one of the worst horror storie…
 
For the first in the new series about the myths behind the zodiac, we have Aquarius. For those who celebrate their birthdays between January 20th and February 18th. Sources Constellation Myths translated by Robin Hard Greek Myths by Robert Graves theoi.com https://www.thecollector.com/athena-poseidon-contest-athens-name-giving/ Music: Medieval Loop…
 
This is the second part in a look at how Anne Boleyn influenced the life of the young Princess Elizabeth, based on Tracy Borman's new book. Check out englandcast.com/ElizabethAnne for link and show notes, including transcripts. Thanks so much for listening! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.…
 
In Elizabethan England, swords were everywhere. Hanging on girdles, used in plays and depicted in paintings, they were an important marker of status and martial prowess. Swordplay was a popular martial art and pastime enjoyed by all rungs of Tudor society. But what would these swords have looked like? And how did Elizabethan gentlemen fight with th…
 
Ottoman Sultans kept a harem of hundreds of enslaved concubines to bear their children. But from 1533 to 1656 a handful of remarkable women bent the harem system to their wills and exercised extraordinary political influence and power. This period is known as the The Sultanate of Women. Hürrem Sultan Mihrimah Sultan Nurbanu Sultan Safiye Sultan Han…
 
This week we are joined by the Military Historians and Podcasters, Robbie McGuire and Matthew Moss from the awesome Fighting on Film podcast. They have come to us to rage that DETAILS DO MATTER and that what we see in a war movie reflects how much care has gone into the subject matter. We’ll be talking Dunkirk, Journey’s End, Atonement and Hamburge…
 
When strange signs appeared in the sky over Quebec in 1660, the French settlers started to worry about evil forces in their midst. Then, a teenaged servant called Barbe Hallay started to act as if she were possessed by demons. She accused a local miller of bewitching her and, the following year, he was imprisoned and executed. Priests and nuns trie…
 
Ottoman Sultans kept a harem of hundreds of enslaved concubines to bear their children. But from 1533 to 1656 a handful of remarkable women bent the harem system to their wills and exercised extraordinary political influence and power. This period is known as the The Sultanate of Women. Hürrem Sultan Mihrimah Sultan Nurbanu Sultan Safiye Sultan Han…
 
In Part 2 of our three-part coverage, Frances Perkins was galvanized by the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire tragedy to turn her talents for research into reform. Her reputation for intelligence, thoroughness and honesty (and the connections she made along the way) led to a meteoric climb into the highest echelon of state government. See Privacy Policy at …
 
This week we are joined by the Historian, Author and Youtuber, Josh Provan who has come on to rage that WHAT IF’S AND COUNTERFACTUALS ARE POINTLESS and that we have taken these well beyond the parlour game they should be. We’ll be talking Samurai vs Knight, justifications for an outcome people won’t accept and in some cases where people bang on abo…
 
We have long been taught that modern global history began when the 'Old World' encountered the 'New', when Christopher Columbus 'discovered' America in 1492. But, in a groundbreaking new book, Dr. Caroline Dodds Pennock conclusively shows that for tens of thousands of Aztecs, Maya, Totonacs, Inuit and others - enslaved people, diplomats, explorers,…
 
The Three Musketeers paints a picture of King Louis XIII of France as a rather weak monarch controlled by his powerful chief minister Cardinal Richelieu. Louis’ reign is generally thought of as being the beginning of the “age of absolutism” when ministers like Richelieu were in the ascendancy and the power of the court and courtiers declined. But w…
 
Join Zac as he explores the famous home of King Henry VIII, Hampton Court Palace. In this episode Zac is going back in time and learning all about the kitchens that would feed the people of Hampton Court Palace. Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Join Zac as he explores the famous home of King Henry VIII, Hampton Court Palace. In this episode Zac is going back in time and learning all about the Georgian period at Hampton Court Palace. Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.By Fun Kids
 
Join Zac as he explores the famous home of King Henry VIII, Hampton Court Palace. In this episode Zac is going back in time and learning all about William who lived in Hampton Court Palace. Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.By Fun Kids
 
Ottoman Sultans kept a harem of hundreds of enslaved concubines to bear their children. But from 1533 to 1656 a handful of remarkable women bent the harem system to their wills and exercised extraordinary political influence and power. This period is known as the The Sultanate of Women. Hürrem Sultan Mihrimah Sultan Nurbanu Sultan Safiye Sultan Han…
 
This week we are joined by the Royal Historian, Literary Agent and author of “The Traitor King”, Andrew Lownie who has come on to settle several rages but mainly that EDWARD VIII WAS NOT A NAZI DUPE but an active intriguer with the Nazis. As well as to flatten the idea that he and Wallis Simpson shared this epic love story that would culminate in t…
 
Many of us are seeing in a new year, but of course there are, even today, several different ways of marking dates and years in various parts of the world. The most popular calendar, though, is the Gregorian, introduced in October 1852 by Pope Gregory XIII. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Dr. Christin…
 
Edmonia Lewis (1844-1907) was history’s first internationally recognized sculptor of African American and Native American descent, and (as you might expect!) a woman with a multifaceted life story. Today's Image: Edmonia Lewis, Forever Free (The Morning of Liberty) (1867). Marble, 41.25 x 22 x 17 in. Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, D.…
 
This week we're sharing again a fascinating podcast first released at this time last Christmas. For the Tudors, Christmas Day was not traditionally the date when gifts were given. The Twelve Days of Christmas begin on 25 December and end at Epiphany, 6 January - also known as Twelfth Night. In Tudor times, all 12 were feast days, but 1 January was …
 
In the fourth part of this series, we’re taking a walk with curator Claudia Acott-Williams into her favourite space at Kensington Palace, the room where Queen Victoria was born. Claudia will explain how this room was intentionally chosen as the birthplace of the future Queen of England. To find out more about the childhood of Queen Victoria go to: …
 
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