show episodes
 
Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street is a novella by the American novelist Herman Melville (1819–1891). It first appeared anonymously in two parts in the November and December 1853 editions of Putnam's Magazine, and was reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. ( Summary by Wikipedia )
 
On an island off the coast of Chile, Captain Amaso Delano, sailing an American sealer, sees the San Dominick, a Spanish slave ship, in obvious distress. Capt. Delano boards the San Dominick, providing needed supplies, and tries to learn from her aloof and disturbed captain, Benito Cereno, the story of how this ship came to be where she is. Dealing with racism, the slave trade, madness, the tension between representation and reality, and featuring at least one unreliable narrator, Melville's ...
 
Typee is Herman Melville's first book, recounting his experiences after having jumped ship in the Marquesas Islands in 1842, and becoming a captive of a cannibal island tribe. It was an immediate success in America and England, and was Melville's most popular work during his lifetime. It was not until the end of the 1930's that it was surpassed in popularity by Moby Dick, more than thirty years after his death. The story provoked harsh criticism for its condemnation of missionary efforts in ...
 
This is a tale based on Melville's experiences aboard the USS United States from 1843 to 1844. It comments on the harsh and brutal realities of service in the US Navy at that time, but beyond this the narrator has created for the reader graphic symbols for class distinction, segregation and slavery aboard this microcosm of the world, the USS Neversink. (Introduction by James K. White)
 
Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas is Herman Melville's sequel to Typee, and, as such, was also autobiographical. After leaving Nuku Hiva, the main character ships aboard a whaling vessel which makes its way to Tahiti, after which there is a mutiny and the majority of the crew are imprisoned on Tahiti. The book follows the actions of the narrator as he explores Tahiti and remarks on their customs and way of life. Many sources incorrectly assert that Omoo is based on Melville's ...
 
“Call me Ishmael” is one of the most famous opening lines in American literature. With these words, opens one of the strangest and most gripping stories ever written about the sea and sea-faring. Moby Dick by Herman Melville is today considered one of the greatest novels written in America but paradoxically, it was a miserable failure when it first made its debut in 1851. Entitled Moby Dick or The Whale the book finally got its due after the author's death and is now regarded as a classic po ...
 
Published in 1866, Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War is a collection of poems about the Civil War by Herman Melville. Many of the poems are inspired by second- and third-hand accounts from print news sources (especially the Rebellion Record) and from family and friends. A handful of trips Melville took before, during, and after the war provide additional angles of vision into the battles, the personalities, and the moods of war. In an opening note, Melville describes his project not so mu ...
 
A whaling ship stops at a remote Polynesian island. The crew aboard is exhausted after a grueling six-month voyage in which they suffered ill-treatment and drudgery. Two men decide to abandon ship and hide on the island, living off the fruit of the land, until they can get on board a more conducive ship. However, to their consternation they discover that part of the island paradise is peopled by a savage and cannibalistic tribe called the Typees. As destiny would have it, they fall into the ...
 
Enjoy a new, curated short story every episode. We hand-pick 15-25 minute short stories from a pool of award-winning fiction writers. Then we turn them into to mini audiobooks that improve any commute, workout, or walk in the park. Read by professional narrators. Every day is a different story. One morning we might bring you a sci-fi thriller by the legendary Ray Bradbury, and the next morning might be a Sherlock Holmes detective story by Arthur Conan Doyle. Romance? We’ve got it. Narrative ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
If reading Dead Men’s Path by Chinua Achebe felt familiar to you, it’s because this three-page short story so accurately captures histories of colonialism. Even through its brevity, it attacks the notions of “out with the old, in with the new”, juxtaposing education and spirituality. In this Left Shelf episode, we discuss the history of Nigeria n c…
 
“If this world is going to be a better place for our grandchildren and great-grandchildren, it will be women who make it so” - Isabelle Allende This - our lives, the lives of our ancestors and the lives of our descendants - is the story. What happens now, what we do now, is history and makes history. In this Left Shelf episode, we discuss The House…
 
If your boss asks you to do anything at work today, respond with “I would prefer not to” because what is work these days if not an act devoid of meaning yet ripe with repetition and mechanization. In this week’s episode, we’ll be talking about Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street, a tragic yet humorous short novella by Herman Melville. Th…
 
Does the title of this episode sound familiar? That’s because The Ones Who Stay and Fight by N.K. Jemisin is a story in response to the very first Left Shelf episode The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas by Ursula K. LeGuin. Jemisin’s story begins in the same way as Le Guin’s, with descriptions of a Utopian city’s beauty and happy citizens. However, t…
 
Did you ever imagine yourself wearing a trenchcoat, walking through the silent streets of Berlin at night, a lonely man who has seen too much and who knows little of love? A man who is too skilled with a bottle of whiskey, too forlorn and just too darn familiar with the cold? Well, lucky, you no longer have to imagine because Le Carré’s most famous…
 
Did you ever imagine yourself wearing a trenchcoat, walking through the silent streets of Berlin at night, a lonely man who has seen too much and who knows little of love? A man who is too skilled with a bottle of whiskey, too forlorn and just too darn familiar with the cold? Well, lucky, you no longer have to imagine because Le Carré’s most famous…
 
Busy, busy, busy. In this week’s episode, we are busy discussing the cult classic “Cat’s Cradle” with Mike from the Turn Leftist podcast. It’s obvious from the very first chapter why this Vonnegut novel is a fan favorite - a new religion called Bokononism, the end of the world brought about by a chemical called ‘ice-nice’ and of course, an eccentri…
 
Jackson Jackson, from this week’s story What You Pawn I Will Redeem by Sherman Alexie, is a homeless Native American living in Seattle on a quest to win back an ancestral regalia. The simultaneously lighthearted and tragic tone of the story led us to discussing topics around loss and identity, about creating values outside of the commodity chain an…
 
After a long hiatus, we're back! Talia talks with Byrd Pinkerton, amazing podcast producer and multimedia artist, about three chapters in which Melville rambles about how people depict whales. We dissect monstrous pictures rendered in florid language. A link to the slideshow Byrd made so lovingly is here, posted to Medium! https://mobydickenergy.me…
 
Overview of Chapters 46-90 with an emphasis on Chapter 54, The Town-Ho Story, that often stalls readers progression through Melville's Moby-Dick with a quick preview of the shortest Chapter 122, Midnight Aloft -- Thunder and Lightning --- Check out youtube video here: LINK Get in touch @profomalleyBy Prof. O'Malley
 
Even though the Nobel Prize winning author Kazuo Ishiguro just came out with a new book, we’re returning to one of his older works Never Let Me Go. In this episode, we’re incredibly excited to talk about our favorite author and book - what Ishiguro’s writing symbolizes, why he’s so freaking good at what he does and what we can learn from the charac…
 
Tune in for a spooky Left Shelf episode this week where we go over two harrowing short stories by H.P. Lovecraft. We talk about the troubled life of H.P. Lovecraft and his even more troubling works - both in terms of blatant racism and xenophobia but also in terms of themes pertaining to existential fear. You can read “At the Mountains of Mountains…
 
If you’ve ever wondered how to curse capitalists and empower the working class, then you have come to the right book. The Factory Witches of Lowell has all of those components and more! Listen as we talk to the author about magic, feminism, and unionizing. The Factory Witches of Lowell is available in print, eBook, or audiobook. Through Folx, you c…
 
The Indian subcontinent has a complicated history of colonialism and political conflict. In this week’s episode, we explore the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 and Bangladeshi independence as experienced by an Indian immigrant living in the United States. Tune in as we talk about the history of that region and explore what it means to be an immigrant in…
 
What is the nature of suffering and is it good? Why is how mental illness was treated in Russia in the late 1800s similar to how it is viewed today? These and many more questions will be answered with our big brains in this week’s episodes of Left Shelf, where we go over Chekhov’s Ward No. 6. It revolutionized Lenin, and maybe it will revolutionize…
 
Talia talks with Beth Skwarecki, senior health editor at Lifehacker, about three fascinating chapters. That's right -- we're BACK! After 33 episodes last year, we're off on the second year of Moby Dick Energy, and with hellish strength we are taking another stab at this great book. This week, we examine Melville's glowing and romantic depictions of…
 
Dear Lorrie Moore, If you are listening (which we know you are), we were really trying to be nice. But we will not apologize for the violence. Tune in to this week’s episodes to hear about how a political piece seems to be devoid of all politics and to hear us vent about boomers. You can read the short story here. The one where she goes off on mill…
 
Che Guevara - the man, the symbol, the legend. Join us as we discuss who Che Guevara was before he became the revolutionary he is known for today. We read “The Motorcycle Diaries”, a journal of Che’s travels throughout South America, and explore the Pan Latin Americanism and Humanism presented in his writings. You can read the whole book here. Foll…
 
Prepare for an emotional rollercoaster of shame, guilt, hope, and finally, inevitable tragedy. In this week’s episode, we read our first longer piece, “Giovanni’s Room” by James Baldwin, and talk about all things sexuality, gender and how all the characters hate women. You can read or listen to the whole book here. Follow the show on: Twitter Faceb…
 
Talia talks to author and producer Jay Bushman, author the new book "Novel Advice," about two marvellous chapters of this book. We're back, babey!!!! With an Agony Aunt letter from Ishmael, an exploration of Melville's orientalism, and the haunting beauty of the spirit-spout.By Talia Lavin
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login