show episodes
 
For months after three white men chased Ahmaud Arbery to his death, Georgia of 2020 looked disconcertingly like Georgia of 1950. This is the story of the long arc of injustice in the American South -- and of the persistence that brought worldwide attention to coastal Georgia. Prior seasons tell the story of Isaiah Nixon, who was killed for voting in 1948 (season one), and A.C. Hall, who police shot in the back in 1962 because they mistakenly thought he was a thief (season two). Hosted by Han ...
 
Watching Lovecraft Country is the unofficial BEST companion podcast to HBO's drama horror television series, Lovecraft Country, by Misha Green. Join Joe and Jimbob every week as we break down each episode. We'll tell you what we liked, what we didn't like, and why the book was better. Based on the 2016 novel of the same name by Matt Ruff, Lovecraft Country follows Atticus Freeman as he joins up with his friend Letitia and his Uncle George to embark on a road trip across 1950s Jim Crow Americ ...
 
The Creative Tension podcast explores the history and legacy of Jim Crow segregation. Host, Elliott Robinson provides the missing chapters from American History class, through a mixture of interviews, archival audio and roundtable discussions. Creative Tension also uses open and frank discussions, to dissect how the legacy of Jim Crow is still impacting our world today. Creative Tension explores topics like: Confederate monuments; “The Talk;” Black caricatures (Mammy, Aunt Jemima and JJ Evan ...
 
What we don’t know about American history hurts us all. Teaching Hard History begins with the long legacy of slavery and reaches through the civil rights movement to the present day. Brought to you by Teaching Tolerance and hosted by Dr. Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Teaching Hard History brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of scholars and educators. It’s good advice for teachers and good information for everybody.
 
In The Marrow of Tradition, Charles W. Chesnutt--using the 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre as a backdrop--probes and exposes the raw nerves and internal machinery of racism in the post-Reconstruction-era South; explores how miscegenation, caste, gender and the idea of white supremacy informed Jim Crow laws; and unflinchingly revisits the most brutal of terror tactics, mob lynchings. (Introduction by James K. White)
 
In this novel, Chesnutt described the hopelessness of Reconstruction in a post-Civil War South that was bent on reestablishing the former status quo and rebuilding itself as a region of the United States where new forms of "slavery" would replace the old. This novel illustrated how race hatred and the impotence of a reluctant Federal Government trumped the rule of law, ultimately setting the stage for the rise of institutions such as Jim Crow, lynching, chain gangs and work farms--all establ ...
 
Idaho Matters is the place on-air and online where folks with different views can talk with each other, exchange ideas, debate with respect and come away richer from the experience. We hope you'll engage with us! Now we're looking for your stories on growth and affordability in the Treasure Valley. Here's how to share your voice. _
 
Southern Hollows is home to the dark side of southern history. These true stories, often little known, take you into historical moments and introduce you to historical figures that we ought never forget. Hear stories of the well-known United States history periods like Reconstruction, Jim Crow, Civil Rights, and Native American Removal, but also stories of the individuals who oppressed and disenfranchised -- and the historical settings that made it possible. If you love challenging stories f ...
 
The Progressive Action show is hosted by two MTA workers Tramell Thompson and Jermell Wilson out of NYC. This show will focus on issues that affect the workplace and our communities, such as social engineering, racism, capitalism, incarceration, Jim Crow, police brutality, unions & unionism, economic slavery, institutionalized racism, and many other devices used to oppress. Not only will we discuss the issues, we will try to create solutions to these problems, brainstorm and put together rea ...
 
Published in 1899, The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line is a collection of narratives that addresses the impact of Jim Crow laws on African Americans and white Americans of the South. Many of Chesnutt's characters are of mixed-race ancestry which sets them apart for a specific yet degrading kind of treatment from blacks and whites. These stories examine particularly how life in the South was informed through a legacy of slavery and Reconstruction—how members of the “old ...
 
You know them from their videos, their book, and their time with the President. And now, they have a podcast! Get the real news, none of the fake media spin. Featuring high profile interviews with the people backing our president and making things happen in Washington. Diamond and Silk are going to bring you real stories from real America! This, is Diamond and Silk The Podcast!
 
Wanna Know Idaho is a listener-generated podcast from Boise State Public Radio's newsroom that is driven by YOU! No matter how quirky or serious your question might be, we want to know: What sparks your curiosity about the Gem State, Idaho culture or the people who call it home? Join this curious collective by subscribing, sharing and reviewing this podcast.
 
A pop culture time machine! Each episode covers that very week from 30 years ago, 20 years ago and 10 years ago, which means each show is loaded with forgotten movies, timeless TV episodes and songs best left to the past. We'll examine TV, movies, music and video games from the 80s, 90s and 2000s. Come remember with us!
 
The music business is in serious trouble. Or is it? There are endless opinions on the subject. Some people think the music business is done, that Elvis has left the building permanently, pushed out a 10th floor window by the internet. Others believe that technology has brought about a state of democracy that has levelled the playing field. So who's right? That depends on your perspective. On "How To Fix The Music Business", people from all sides of the music industry share their perspectives ...
 
Freedom through Speech Radio (F.T.S.R) is a bi-weekly program dedicated to allowing anyone and everyone to have a voice through contributing to the discussion surrounding various timely and pertinent issues. Hosted by noted blogger and provocateur extraordinaire RiPPa of the blog The Intersection of Madness & Reality, community activist and academic Professor Max Reddick of the blog soulbrother v.2, and New York based attorney The Janitor of the blog The Urban Politico, you can always expect ...
 
A modern U.S. history podcast about the events that spanned the Baby Boomer generation’s lifespan & that are still relevant to people today, especially to Millennials. Unlike some history podcasts, this podcast follows the national story in a chronological manner, starting in 1946. Most episodes are around a half-hour to 45 minutes in length. Each episode covers one year, possibly going all the way up to the present.
 
Wake Up Call is a podcast series recorded on location at CreativeMornings Cleveland’s breakfast lecture series. Join us as we explore the thought provoking themes surrounding each month’s event. Excerpts of the lecture are book ended by meaningful conversations with attendees and speakers alike. *This podcast is a production of the Ohio Film Tax Credit.
 
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show series
 
Exporting Jim Crow: Blackface Minstrelsy in South Africa and Beyond (U Massachusetts Press, 2020) by Dr. Chinua Thelwell is a rich, well-researched, and sobering investigation of blackface minstrelsy as the “visual bedrock of a transcolonial cultural imaginary.” In tracing minstrel globalization across the Anglo-colonial and British imperial worlds…
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
Have you ever felt, “Oh my God, I’m turning into my mother (or father)!” ? Robert Plomin explains why that happens in Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are (MIT Press, 2019). A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent lifelong sources of our psychological individuality―the blueprint that …
 
In Miracles and Material Life: Rice, Ore, Traps and Guns in Islamic Malaya (Cambridge University Press), Teren Sevea reveals the economic, environmental and religious significance of Islamic miracle workers (pawangs) in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Malay world. Through close textual analysis of hitherto overlooked manuscripts and personal …
 
Why Give a Damn About Strangers? In his book The Kindness of Strangers: How a Selfish Ape Invented a New Moral Code (Basic Books, 2020), Michael E. McCullough explains. McCullough is a professor of psychology at the University of California San Diego, where he directs the Evolution and Human Behavior laboratory. Long interested in prosocial behavio…
 
Why Give a Damn About Strangers? In his book The Kindness of Strangers: How a Selfish Ape Invented a New Moral Code (Basic Books, 2020), Michael E. McCullough explains. McCullough is a professor of psychology at the University of California San Diego, where he directs the Evolution and Human Behavior laboratory. Long interested in prosocial behavio…
 
The breathless pace of China’s economic reform has brought about deep ruptures in socioeconomic structures and people’s inner landscape. Faced with increasing market-driven competition and profound social changes, more and more middle-class urbanites are turning to Western-style psychological counseling to grapple with their mental distress. Anxiou…
 
On November 3, 1969 Richard M. Nixon addressed the nation in what would come to be known as “The Silent Majority Speech”. In 32 minutes, the president promoted his plan for a “Vietnamization” of the war and called upon “the great silent majority of my fellow Americans” to support his plan “to end the war in a way that we could win the peace”. Argui…
 
Deep in the jungles of Myanmar lie the remains of an ancient kingdom, the 15th-century royal city of Mrauk-U. Located in the Bay of Bengal and separated from the rest of the country by the Arakan mountain range, Mrauk-U Township boasts a stunning rural landscape dotted with the hundreds of spires of stone temples, remnants of the former glories of …
 
JC de Swaan does not shy from a challenge. In his new book, Seeking Virtue in Finance: Contributing to Society in a Conflicted Industry (Cambridge University Press, 2020), de Swaan, argues that it is possible to work in finance and not fall prey to the worst ethical ills of a profit maximizing industry. A lecturer at Princeton and partner in at Wal…
 
When you mention Japanese War crimes in World War Two, you’ll often get different responses from different generations. The oldest among us will talk about the Bataan Death March. Younger people, coming of age in the 1990s, will mention the Rape of Nanking or the comfort women forced into service by the Japanese army. Occasionally, someone will men…
 
During the South Central Public Health District board meeting on Wednesday, trustees in the Magic Valley heard updates from hospitals, which are under great stress as they're running out of beds and staff to take care of patients. The trustees voted against an order for mandatory face masks, but passed a ban on gatherings of more than 50 people ind…
 
Idaho is experiencing the largest spike in new coronavirus cases since our first case was reported in mid-March. But this time, we're headed into colder months where safer outdoor interactions will be less possible, all while flu season is beginning. What could the next few weeks bring, and is the state ready for a surge in hospitals?…
 
Idaho is experiencing the largest spike in new coronavirus cases since our first case was reported in mid-March. But this time, we're headed into colder months where safer outdoor interactions will be less possible, all while flu season is beginning. What could the next few weeks bring, and is the state ready for a surge in hospitals?…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
In the decades since it was identified in 1981, HIV/AIDS has devastated African American communities. Members of those communities mobilized to fight the epidemic and its consequences from the beginning of the AIDS activist movement. They struggled not only to overcome the stigma and denial surrounding a "white gay disease" in Black America, but al…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
What are the possibilities and what are the inequalities of the digital world? In The Digital Lives of Black Women in Britain (Palgrave, 2020), Francesca Sobande, a lecturer in Digital Media Studies at Cardiff University explores the experiences of Black women as producers and as consumers of digital media. The book offers a rich combination of arc…
 
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, over three hundred young Jewish women from Orthodox, mostly Hasidic, homes in Western Galicia (now Poland) fled their communities and sought refuge in a Kraków convent, where many converted to Catholicism. Relying on a wealth of archival documents, including court testimonies, letters, diaries, …
 
At the end of the 20th century, the liberal international order appeared unassailable after its triumph over the authoritarian challenges of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Twenty years later, however, the assumptions underlying the system appear discredited as international relations devolve into confrontation and conflict. In The New Twenty Years…
 
In the decades since it was identified in 1981, HIV/AIDS has devastated African American communities. Members of those communities mobilized to fight the epidemic and its consequences from the beginning of the AIDS activist movement. They struggled not only to overcome the stigma and denial surrounding a "white gay disease" in Black America, but al…
 
Heather Lende was one of the thousands of women inspired to take a more active role in politics during the past few years. Though her entire campaign for assembly member in Haines, Alaska, cost less than $1,000, she won! But tiny, breathtakingly beautiful Haines—a place accessible from the nearest city, Juneau, only by boat or plane—isn’t the sleep…
 
As the 2020 presidential campaign begins to take shape, there is widespread distrust of the fairness and accuracy of American elections. In Election Meltdown: Dirty Tricks, Distrust, and the Threat to American Democracy (Yale UP, 2020), Richard L. Hasen uses riveting stories illustrating four factors increasing the mistrust. Voter suppression has e…
 
With Against Demagogues: What Aristophanes Can Teach Us about the Perils of Populism and the Fate of Democracy (University of California Press, 2020), Robert Bartlett provides a stirring argument for the relevance of comic playwright Aristophanes as a serious political and philosophical thinker. In his translations of two lesser-known plays, The Ac…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
In 1618, on the eve of the Thirty Years’ War, the German alchemist and physician Michael Maier published Atalanta fugiens, an intriguing and complex musical alchemical emblem book designed to engage the ear, eye, and intellect. The book unfolds as a series of fifty emblems, each of which contains an accompanying "fugue" music scored for three voice…
 
At the end of the 20th century, the liberal international order appeared unassailable after its triumph over the authoritarian challenges of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Twenty years later, however, the assumptions underlying the system appear discredited as international relations devolve into confrontation and conflict. In The New Twenty Years…
 
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