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The surprising connections in science and technology that give you the Big Picture. Astronomer Seth Shostak and science journalist Molly Bentley are joined each week by leading researchers, techies, and journalists to provide a smart and humorous take on science. Our regular "Skeptic Check" episodes cast a critical eye on pseudoscience.
 
New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Emily Kwong for science on a different wavelength.
 
Signs of Life Radio Show is a unique radio show dedicated to the exploration of Life After Death! Call In or just listen to top Scientists, Mediums, and Researchers discuss their personal work in the field and answer your most perplexing questions. Topics will include: Mediumship, Near Death Experiences, Death Bed Visions, Reincarnation, Apparitions and Poltergeists, After Death Communication, ESP and Telepathy, Survival of Consciousness ..... and the list is endless!
 
The Data Skeptic Podcast features interviews and discussion of topics related to data science, statistics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and the like, all from the perspective of applying critical thinking and the scientific method to evaluate the veracity of claims and efficacy of approaches.
 
Planetary Radio brings you the human adventure across our solar system and beyond. We visit each week with the scientists, engineers, leaders, advocates and astronauts who are taking us across the final frontier. Regular features raise your space IQ while they put a smile on your face. Join host Mat Kaplan and Planetary Society colleagues including Bill Nye the Science Guy, Bruce Betts, and Emily Lakdawalla as they dive deep into the latest space news. The monthly Space Policy Edition takes ...
 
For the first 100 episodes, the Life Of The School podcast was a series of episodes where Aaron Mathieu interviewed different life science teachers to discus their path to the classroom, work in the classroom, and hopes and dreams for the future. Starting in September 2020 (episode 102), LOTS became a panel discussion podcast, exploring various issues we face in our classroom.
 
The Science series presents cutting-edge research about biology, physics, chemistry, ecology, geology, astronomy, and more. These events appeal to many different levels of expertise, from grade school students to career scientists. With a range of relevant applications, including medicine, the environment, and technology, this series expands our thinking and our possibilities.
 
Art and philosophy for an age of accelerating weirdness! Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield and an avalanche of amazing guests for deep but irreverent discussions at the edge of the known and knowable: on science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and self-fulfilling prophecies, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for proliferating futures, art ...
 
This is a podcast that answers the question, "what should we have been learning while we were memorizing Kreb's cycle?" This is a practical guide for practicing physicians and other healthcare practitioners looking to improve in any and all aspects of our lives and practices. Physician and non-physician experts are interviewed on a wide range of topics to help us with personal and professional development. If you want to share you expertise on the podcast, please email me at brad@physiciansg ...
 
Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Want proof of life after death? Your loved ones may be physically gone but they still exist and you will see them again...your pets don't die either. Each episode of We Don't Die you'll hear the experiences of men and women, and why they believe life after death is REAL and why your life on earth is important. Join your host, Sandra Champlain, author of the #1 international bestseller, We Don't Die - A Skeptic's Discovery of Life After Death, for podcast episodes that aim to give you goosebu ...
 
Welcome to The Psychology Podcast. In each episode, we talk with inspiring scientists, thinkers, and other self-actualized individuals who will give you a greater understanding of yourself, others, and the world we live in. Scott Barry Kaufman explores the depths of human potential and tries to get a glimpse into human possibility in every episode.
 
Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Monday nights at 7pm ET.
 
Dope Labs is a new podcast from Spotify Studios hosted by best friends (and two of the dopest scientists you will ever meet), Titi and Zakiya. In each episode, they serve up scientific principles with a healthy dose of tea. From cuffing season to Cardi B, they’ll take what’s trending and put it under the microscope with the help of some very smart (and cool) scientific friends. At Dope Labs, we believe “science is for errybody” and our mission is to bring out the inner scientist in YOU.
 
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show series
 
Doctors rarely study spontaneous remissions from serious diseases. Why not? They are unpredictable, for one thing. For another, they are said to be exceedingly rare. Despite this, Dr. Jeffrey Rediger has found that most of his colleagues are aware of at least one case that defies explanation by conventional science. He set out to learn more about t…
 
This episode is a little different. Adrienne Leussa invited me to be the first guest on her podcast, Africa Biotech Conversations, which I was happy to do. We traded questions back and forth about our audiences our goals and our experiences in our life science communities. Her vision is to create connections within the African biotech community. I …
 
Chris Hadfield was the first Canadian to walk in space, became commander of the International Space Station, and became a viral sensation after covering Bowie like no one else. He speaks to the Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, about life as an astronaut, the new race to the moon and his new novel, The Apollo Murders.. Help support our indepen…
 
Methuselah lived to 969 years old, according to the Bible. In our recent age, Jeanne Calmet holds the title of the oldest person who ever lived. She lived to be 122 years and 164 days old. There’s a woman in Japan, Kane Tanaka, who is currently 118. Jiroemon Kimuri, also from Japan, is the oldest man of all time, living to 116 years and 54 days. Ho…
 
Life nearby? We’ve not yet found any on our favorite planet, Mars. But even if Mars is sterile, could we ever change that by terraforming it? Or seeding it with life from Earth? The Red Planet is not the only game in town: A new NASA mission to a Jovian moon may give clues to biology on a world where, unlike Mars, liquid water still exists. Also, t…
 
The James Webb Space Telescope was first conceived in the late 1980s. Now, more than 30 years later, it’s finally set to launch in December. After such a long a road, anticipation over what the telescope will contribute to astronomy is intense. Daniel Clery, a staff writer for Science, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what took so long and wha…
 
As all eyes have been on the virus, other serious killer diseases took a backseat.Resources and staff were diverted, lockdowns were common all over the world and a very real fear of Covid-19 kept people away from clinics and hospitals.Claudia Hammond and her expert panel from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America look at the devastating impact of …
 
Intro music by etsywitch. In this episode we discuss the ever-annoying American culture war and then move on to the science behind mRNA vaccine technology and why viruses are so cool in regards to watching evolution in action (vaccines themselves will act as a selection pressure on viruses, but can the viruses cope and evolve or will they become ex…
 
What do you need to know about the new COVID-19 vaccines for ages 5 - 11? Sam, age 8, and Natalie, age 10, are here to help! They participated in a COVID vaccine trial, which is an important part of the science that will help end the threat of coronavirus. Along with Dr. Kawsar Talaat, an epidemiologist who helped run the trials, they share the beh…
 
Southeast Asia is the most tectonically and geologically active region on Earth. These processes have enriched the mountains and basins with world-famous mineral and energy resources, fresh water, and highly productive soils. However, the same geological processes are responsible for incredible destruction – from the 1991 Mount Pinatubo volcanic er…
 
Carmen Brown, MD, is an author, blogger, practicing OB-GYN, and managing partner and founder of ExpatMD. She currently resides in Melbourne, Australia with her husband and young son. We talk about how she ended up practicing down-under, how to make it happen, what some of the differences about practicing down there and focused a bit on practice of …
 
Original broadcast date: July 10, 2020. What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerl…
 
Where did covid-19 really come from? Well, the team explains why the wet market in Wuhan is back on top as the most likely place of origin. They also look ahead to the future of the pandemic, as the delta variant continues to run rampant across the globe. In eyesight news, forget carrots - if you want to improve your vision all you need (maybe) is …
 
DART is a space mission designed to hit a distant asteroid and knock it slightly out of orbit. It’s a test mission, a pilot project for a way of potentially protecting the earth from a stray asteroid. We hear from mission coordinators Nancy Chabot and Andy Rivkin, both from the Applied Physics Labs, APL, of Johns Hopkins University.A new kind of Co…
 
Have you noticed the trees around you lately—maybe they seem extra nutty? It turns out this is a “masting” year, when trees make more nuts, seeds, and pinecones than usual. Science Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the many mysteries of masting years. Next, Producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Jean-Laurent Casanova, a…
 
Malaria, a disease that infects hundreds of millions of people and kills hundreds of thousands each year. It is caused after a plasmodium parasite is passed from a blood-feeding mosquito into a human host. Subject to much research over hundreds of years, of both host and parasite, one of the evolutionary mysteries has been why the plasmodium so pro…
 
On this episode of the Real Life Pharmacology podcast, I explore doxycycline pharmacology, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Doxycycline can be bound by numerous minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron. Coadministration can lead to reduced concentrations. Sun sensitivity is a really important adverse effect that can be caused by doxycyclin…
 
https://www.wedontdie.com/ Film Producer of many films including What Dreams May Come, Somewhere in Time and Conversations with God, Stephen Simon has a love for sharing thought-provoking and live-impacting messages. He is here on this special interview to share his book “What Dreams Have Come: Loving Through the Veil” which he co-wrote with his wi…
 
In this episode, I talk to renowned neuroscientist Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett about emotions and the brain. She reveals what the true function of the brain is⎯and it’s not for thinking. We also discuss the impact of past experiences on our cognition and what we can do to overcome our own detrimental patterns. Further into our discussion, Dr. Lisa cha…
 
With Black Friday and Cyber Monday coming up, and the holiday shopping season right around the corner, there’s going to be a lot of people clicking “Add to Cart” over the next few weeks. This year has been full of headlines about labor shortages, trucker strikes, and stalled cargo ships. In this crazy economic climate, how are companies managing to…
 
The 1821 Greek war for independence from the Ottoman empire became an inspiration for people all over Europe who wanted to dismantle the old multi-ethnic empires. But it is less well known that a number of women played key roles in the uprising. In this programme, Bridget Kendall and guests focus on Laskarina Bouboulina, perhaps the best known of G…
 
Last week the UK government confirmed it would be extending its Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill to include decapods (such as crabs, lobsters and crayfish), and cephalopods (such as octopuses, squid and cuttlefish). The move followed a government-commissioned review of the scientific evidence, which found strong evidence that cephalopods and decapod…
 
Ariel Ekblaw and her Space Exploration Initiative colleagues believe we are at the cusp of interplanetary civilization. They are building the tools, environments and knowledge that will speed the transition and solve problems on Earth. Ariel has published Into the Anthropocosmos, a beautiful celebration of SEI’s fifth anniversary that presents many…
 
For over two decades, physicists have pondered how the fabric of space-time may emerge from some kind of quantum entanglement. In Monika Schleier-Smith’s lab at Stanford University, the thought experiment is becoming real. The post One Lab’s Quest to Build Space-Time Out of Quantum Particles first appeared on Quanta Magazine…
 
Health insurance can be tremendously confusing, with its complexity, jargon and acronyms. But putting in a bit of time to learn what these health insurance terms mean can empower you to better understand what signing on to a plan might mean for your budget and your health. Whether you're picking a plan for the first time, thinking of changing a pla…
 
Depersonalisation disorder involves feeling completely disconnected from yourself or from reality. It’s among the most common yet under-recognised psychiatric conditions and as such is hard to diagnose. Joe Perkins whose new book Life on Autopilot charts his 14 year experience with the disorder, discusses his long journey on the road to formal diag…
 
In this episode of The Disappearing Spoon, Sam Kean talks about Hermann Muller, a geneticist who in the 1920s discovered that radiation causes genetic mutations. This discovery happened around the same time that other geneticists were starting to link cancer with genetic mutations. Had both of these parties communicated they would have gotten a 50-…
 
How good is food in space? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Jordan Klepper feast on food science and the challenges we face sending food to space with chef Alton Brown, food chemist Dr. Arielle Johnson and NASA food scientist Dr. Grace Douglas. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencesalon/mss229_Fritjof_Capra_2021_10_29.mp3 Download MP3 Fritjof Capra, scientist, educator, activist, and accomplished author, presents the evolution of his thought over five decades in Patterns of Connection. First introduced in the late 1950s to the work of Werner Heisenberg, a founder of quantum mechanics,…
 
Millions of Americans are planning to travel this week and gather inside for Thanksgiving — many in groups of 10 or more. At the same time, COVID-19 cases are rebounding. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey's been talking to experts to find out how to gather in-person as safely as possible and minimize a new surge. Read the CDC's tips on gathering for…
 
Our guest today is Howard Farran. In this episode, we talked about life, dentistry, and other updates. Tune in Next Week for part two of this podcast. Resources for Life and Dentistry: www.lifeanddentistry.com Click HERE to leave us a review on iTunes Facebook Instagram Twitter If you have any questions you can send us an email to lifeanddentistry@…
 
Biologist Matthew Cobb presents the first episode in a series which looks at the 50-year history of genetic engineering, from the concerns around the first attempts at combining the DNA of one organism with the genes of another in 1971 to today’s gene editing technique known as CRISPR.The first experiments to combine the DNA of two different organi…
 
ESA's senior science advisor Mark McCaughrean joins Space Boffins Sue Nelson and Richard Hollingham to enthuse about the most powerful space telescope ever built. And NASA astronaut Jessica Meir discusses coming back from the ISS to a world in the grip of Covid-19, her first all women space walk, and her preparations as part of the Artemis astronau…
 
As we’ve heard from Carol Anderson and others on this show, the fight for voting rights often breaks down along racial and partisan lines. Desmond Meade saw that as a problem and set out to change it by channeling our shared sense of humanity and the common good to push for change. Meade is a formerly homeless returning citizen who overcame many ob…
 
In Asphalt: A History (U Nebraska Press, 2021), Kenneth O’Reilly provides a history of this everyday substance. By tracing the history of asphalt—in both its natural and processed forms—from ancient times to the present, O’Reilly sets out to identify its importance within various contexts of human society and culture. Although O’Reilly argues that …
 
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