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Best Medieval History podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Medieval History podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
For many episodes to come, we'll be exploring the rich history of Poland. From it's humble beginnings, we'll follow the people of Poland as they form their own unique cultural identity, rise into a great European power, cross paths with the Mongol Horde, save Europe from an Ottoman invasion, and do their best to keep their independence firm from one generation to the next.
 
Music, culture, the arts, maritime exploration - Renaissance England was an exciting place to be. So much happening! Breaks with Rome. Wars with France. And Scotland. And Spain! Twice a month, we'll look at some aspect of Renaissance England that will give you a deeper understanding into life in the 16th century. Go to http://www.englandcast.com for more info.
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
What led to the rise of the modern world? How have we made so much progress, and what are its consequences? What are humanity's best ideas? Join award-winning historian Brad Harris as he engages these fundamental questions and interprets the biggest historical forces that shape their answers, from the rise of civilization and the development of modern science to the spread of disease and the growth of globalization.
 
A podcast on European conflicts from the perspective of each side to provide an alternative to the traditional national narratives. Going chronologically from the Ancient Greeks onwards I will describe to some extent how each battle was won or lost by particular decisions, tactics, technology or fortune. But the aim of each main narrative will be to place each battle in the context of the overall history of Europe. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/ahistoryofeurope.
 
I'm Cullen Burke and this is Cauldron, a history of the world battle by battle. Every two weeks I'll cover the important battles in history and then hash out listener theories and thoughts on how the world would look if the outcome were different.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. Host Erik Rivenes interviews authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and the stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
The AskHistorians Podcast showcases the knowledge and enthusiasm of the AskHistorians community, a forum of more than 400,000 history academics, professionals, amateurs, and curious onlookers. The aim is to be a resource accessible across a wide range of listeners for historical topics which so often go overlooked. Together, we have a broad array of people capable of speaking in-depth on topics that get half a page on Wikipedia, a paragraph in a high-school textbook, and not even a minute on ...
 
The History of the Copts Podcast is a narrative history of Roman and Medieval Egypt through the eyes of its native population, the Copts. The Podcast is a part of @copticvoiceus – a 501C(3) non-profit with the mission to help forge a global Coptic identify. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jonathan-adly/support
 
Historian and journalist Tony Perrottet unearths sexual stories from throughout the ages. The series is modeled on the "secret cabinets" in Victorian museums, where medieval chastity belts, Renaissance pornography and perverse novels by the Marquis de Sade were hidden. Each episode will answer a burning question: How did Napoleon's penis end up in suburban New Jersey? Are champagne glasses modeled on Marie-Antoinette's breasts? How did you behave at one of Caligula's orgies? And what were Ca ...
 
Jason Weiser tells stories from myths, legends, and folklore that have shaped cultures throughout history. Some, like the stories of Aladdin, King Arthur, and Hercules are stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories you might not have heard, but really should. All the stories are sourced from world folklore, but retold for modern ears. These are stories of wizards, knights, Vikings, dragons, princesses, and kings from the time when the world beyond the map was ...
 
Welcome to The Medieval World Podcast, where we explore fun and interesting pieces of medieval history. Each Friday, I publish a new episode. In addition to episodes, check out my lectures below. If there's an episode or series you would like to see, let me know via email at themedievalworldpodcast@gmail.com. Also, you can follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/wjb_mattingly . I am also starting to create videos of my lectures at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxmN86fC3uYC9JW-hKV4Z1w.
 
CEU Medieval Podcast is a collection of past episodes of the radio's weekly talk show 'Past Perfect!' and recorded public lectures presented at Central European University's Medieval Studies Department. Music was removed from the podcast version of the shows due to copyright regulations.
 
Come join me, Cy, as I uncover and explore the stories of the people and places that make up (or made up) our world. Whether through primary sources such as ancient inscriptions or interviews with some of the greatest scholars in the field of ancient and medieval history, this podcast will expose you to historical topics that are rarely covered in depth by others. Many of these programs will be supplements to the videos that appear on the popular History with Cy YouTube channel. You won't wa ...
 
What makes us human? Humans are just animals who know how to cook. Whether you're interested in food, history, or both like I am, this podcast is for you Visit anthrochef.blog for recipes. Theme music by Michael Levy of Ancient Lyre. “An Ancient Lyre” and much more is available from all major digital music stores and streaming sites.
 
Sharing the History of The Viking Age, one podcast at a time. We are covering the History of Scandinavia during the Viking Age. We're exploring Raiding, Trading and Settlement of Scandinavians abroad as well as the culture and society of the Norse homelands. Join us to learn more than you ever thought you wanted to know about the people, for better or worse, history knows as the Vikings.
 
Too often when we think about the history of a country we think only of kings, lords, castles, and battles. When we think of queens we think of rulers like Elizabeth I and Victoria, but what about the queens who sat beside their warrior husbands? This podcast is an alternative history of Medieval and Early Modern England, seen through the lives of its queens
 
Get your kid away from screens for a fun fifteen-minutes, answering the big questions in history! Fun for parents too! Subscribe for free on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Soundcloud and wherever else you get podcasts! Join us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and our webpage. Graphics by Molly Austin of mollyavalon.com Instrumental music by bensound.com
 
A podcast by two friends who discuss women from history they've never heard of before. Inspired by that all too common feeling, "How did I not know about her?!?", we aim to elevate the stories of a wide range of woman, from Egyptian civil rights activists to medieval nuns to the first female (almost) astronauts. We share their stories, discuss their impact and why they've been ignored or sidelined, and often get a little mad at the patriarchy.
 
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show series
 
In this episode, I talk with Pernilla Myrne about her exciting and excellently researched book Female Sexuality in the Early Medieval Islamic World: Gender and Sex in Arabic Literature, published with IB Taurus in 2020. Pernilla Myrne is an Associate Professor of Arabic Literature and History at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, where she als…
 
Today I talk to Professor Howard Williams, from the Department of History & Archaeology at the University of Chester, UK. Book Recommendations: Formative Britain by Martin Carver | De Gruyter's The Vikings Reimagined: Reception, Recovery, Engagement by Tom Birkett and Roderick Dale | Digging into the Dark Ages: Early Medieval Public Archaeologies b…
 
Before the global pandemic of Covid-19 arrived, public health experts in the U.S. and U.K. were warning of the epidemic of loneliness. Loneliness steals more years of life than obesity. Loneliness is as much of a risk as smoking. Loneliness shortens a lifespan as much as poverty. It is associated with addiction, depression, anxiety, paranoia, and e…
 
Warning: Economics. In this episode, we begin with Eisler’s testimony before the skeptical Senators of the Committee on Banking and Currency in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 1934, in which he proposed that the nation adopt a dual currency system to control inflation and end the Great Depression. I (a non-economist) talk about what this means with…
 
Nasser Rahmaninejad’s A Man of the Theatre: Survival as an Artist in Iran (New Village Press) provides a fascinating glimpse into the political and artistic life of Iran. This memoir discusses the difficulties of creating progressive theatre under the murderous and repressive regime of the Shah (supported by the United States), the “prison commune”…
 
Engaging with almost any Western philosopher of the last couple centuries means you are usually, whether you realize it or not, working in the shadow of Hegel, his work proving stubbornly resistant to attempts to remove from contemporary thought. This has itself proven to be a source of much debate and conflict, as Hegel is notoriously difficult to…
 
When we talk about technology we always talk about the future—which makes it hard to figure out how to get there. In Future Histories: What Ada Lovelace, Tom Paine, and the Paris Commune Can Teach Us about Digital Technology (Verso), Lizzie O’Shea argues that we need to stop looking forward and start looking backwards. Weaving together histories of…
 
David Kaiser is a truly unique scholar: he is simultaneously a physics researcher and a historian of science whose writing beautifully melds the past and future of science. As a historian, he studies mostly 20th-century physics, and in particular the history of quantum mechanics, Feynman diagrams, physics in the counterculture era, and much more. A…
 
When the name "Butch Cassidy" is mentioned, it conjures an image (for many of us) of Paul Newman, who along with Robert Redford joked their way through the classic 1969 film "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid". But that movie was almost entirely fictional, and as often typical, Hollywood ignored the far more interesting factual historical account …
 
In the latest of our series tackling the big questions on major historical topics, historian Mark White responds to listener queries and popular search enquiries about the Cold War nuclear confrontation between the US and the USSR. Historyextra.com/podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
A year in the life of Elizabethan England - this time we look at 1601. The year of Hamlet. The East India Company's first voyage. Secret correspondence with Scotland. So much good stuff happened this year. Show notes will be up at englandcast.com/1601. Remember if you like this show, I'd be eternally grateful (and you'd earn good indie-podcaster ka…
 
(Christine and Elizabeth) How do modern films portray revolutions? What are some of the things regularly included - and just as regularly left out? In the first of this special pair of episodes Elizabeth and Christine step away from their scripts and join Gil and Rutger of Pod Academy for a Summer Special conversation about 2000’s The Patriot and 2…
 
Announcements: Hello everyone. Before I begin today’s episode I have three quick announcements. First, I was a guest on the French Embassy to the United States’ official podcast ‘Francofiles’ where I discussed the history behind Juillet Quatorze, known as Bastille Day in the Anglo-Phone world. It’s coming up this Tuesday so there’s no better time t…
 
John Haldon (Princeton University) talks to Merle and Lee about how states and societies react to systemic crises through the lens of resilience studies. After an introductory discussion about the concept of resilience, they speak about how the Byzantine Empire survived massive political, economic, and military losses during the seventh century and…
 
In this episode, I talk with Pernilla Myrne about her exciting and excellently researched book Female Sexuality in the Early Medieval Islamic World: Gender and Sex in Arabic Literature, published with IB Taurus in 2020. Pernilla Myrne is an Associate Professor of Arabic Literature and History at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, where she als…
 
In this episode, Hailey teaches Alexis about Robert Smalls, a slave turned soldier turned Congressman who did everything he could to build up his race to be on equal footing. Special thanks to our patrons: Kathleen, Katelynn, Ashley, Loreena & Josh, Gamy, Sadie, Natalie, Natalya, Daniel, Michael, Julia, Kara, Macoy, Coffee Infused Nerd, Abigail, Po…
 
The sixteenth episode of The History of Now, a podcast from the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge. Listen to Simon Szreter and Chris Clark discuss Fighting the Pox in 18th-Century London. Simon Szreter is Professor of History and Public Policy at the University of Cambridge Chris Clark is the Regius Professor of History at the Unive…
 
How do the political afterlives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. continue to shape American democracy? How does a common myth of opposition distort our understanding of civil rights? In his dual biography, The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. (Basic Books, 2020), Peniel E. Joseph (Barbara…
 
Modest fashion is a growing, global multi-billion-dollar market. As a fashion trend, it has increasingly made its way into high-profile runways, has been endorsed by celebrities, and profiled in major fashion publications and news outlets. Hafsa Lodi’s Modesty: A Fashion Paradox (Neem Tree Press, 2020) investigates how and why modest fashion became…
 
This podcast is for all of your fans of Babylonian history! In it, we take a look at the some of the most obscure centuries in Babylonian history and the events as well as the dynasties that shaped them, namely the Second Dynasty of the Sealand, the Bazi Dynasty, the Elamite Dynasty and the mysterious Dynasty of E. This is the history of Babylon th…
 
Origen of Alexandria was one of the most important figures in Christian antiquity—most brilliant and most productive—yet also one of the most complicated. He was widely influential and widely despised. He was praised for his accomplishments and blamed for disasters. He wrote thousands of books and invented several academic disciplines, including sc…
 
In this episode, u/EnclavedMicrostate interviews Brian Dott about the history of the chile pepper in China. This covers the pepper's introduction and spread, its integration into existing Chinese cuisine and understandings of culinary theory, its use as a medicine, as a cultural metaphor, and as a marker of regional identities.…
 
Historian David Abulafia discusses his latest book, The Boundless Sea: A Human History of the Oceans, which was recently declared the winner of the prestigious Wolfson History Prize. Our conversation focuses in particular on the maritime history of the medieval era. Historyextra.com/podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
It's hard to remember how intelligent humanity can be when we are relentlessly bombarded by bad news. Author and mathematician Steven Strogatz helps to remind us with his recent book, Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe. The history of calculus may seem irrelevant to most of our going concerns, but as Strogatz shows, t…
 
The story starts out with one prince slaying a dragon and getting rich. It starts there. The wild ride of the Nibelungenlied has echoes of one of our most beloved stories, the Saga of the Volsungs, with it's over-the-top characters, the ridiculous situations, the betrayals, and, yes, dragon fights. The creature is a dragon cat with poison breath. -…
 
“What makes song sparrows, Verdi, medieval monks, and minstrelsy part of the same taxonomy?” So asks—and answers—Rachel Mundy, who is Assistant Professor of Music at Rutgers University–Newark. In her book, Animal Musicalities: Birds, Beasts, and Evolutionary Listening (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), Mundy shows how the history of the humanities …
 
In this episode, we focus on one of Eisler’s most controversial works, a reconstruction of the 1st-century Roman Jewish historian Josephus’ account of the events surrounding the death of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist, including a new physical description of Jesus that apparently prompted the Christ to appear to followers in America to …
 
Juan Francisco Manzano and Gabriel de la Concepción Valdés (Plácido) were perhaps the most important and innovative Cuban writers of African descent during the Spanish colonial era. Both nineteenth-century authors used Catholicism as a symbolic language for African-inspired spirituality. Likewise, Plácido and Manzano subverted the popular imagery o…
 
In Michelangelo’s Inner Anatomies (Penn State University Press), Christian Kleinbub challenges the notion that Michelangelo, renowned for his magnificent portrayals of the human body, was merely concerned with “superficial” anatomy—that is, the parts of the body that can be seen from the outside. Providing a fresh perspective on the artist’s portra…
 
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