show episodes
 
From long-lost Viking ships to kings buried in unexpected places; from murders and power politics, to myths, religion, the lives of ordinary people: Gone Medieval is History Hit’s podcast dedicated to the middle ages, in Europe and far beyond.
  continue reading
 
This my retelling of the story of England, which is a regular, chronological podcast, starting from the end of Roman Britain. There are as many of the great events I can squeeze in, of course, but I also try to keep an eye on how people lived, their language, what was important to them, the forces that shaped their lives and destinies, that sort of thing. To support the podcast, access a library of 100 hours of shedcasts of me warbling on, and get new shedcasts every month, why not become a ...
  continue reading
 
The BHP is a chronological retelling of the history of Britain with a particular focus upon the lives of the people. You won’t find a dry recounting of dates and battles here, but instead you’ll learn about who these people were and how their desires, fears, and flaws shaped the scope of this island at the edge of the world. And some of those desires are downright scandalous.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Exploring the history and mythology of the ancient world. Archaeologists and scholars join to discuss ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, and other civilizations of the distant past.
  continue reading
 
This is After Dark: Myths, Misdeeds and the Paranormal. The podcast that takes you to the shadiest corners of the past, unpicking history’s spookiest, strangest, and most sinister stories. Join historians Anthony Delaney and Maddy Pelling, every Monday and Thursday to take a look at the darker side of history. From haunted pubs and Houdini, to witch trials and weird UFO sightings. After Dark: Myths, Misdeeds and the Paranormal - a podcast by History Hit, the world's best history channel and ...
  continue reading
 
The History Extra podcast brings you gripping stories from the past and fascinating historical conversations with the world's leading historical experts. Produced by the team behind BBC History Magazine, History Extra is a free history podcast, with episodes released six times a week. Subscribe now for the real stories behind your favourite films, TV shows and period dramas, as well as compelling insights into lesser-known aspects of the past. We delve into global history stories spanning th ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Weird Medieval Guys

Weird Medieval Guys

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Leaving no stone unturned in our quest for the weirdest stories, guys, and art from the Middle Ages. The Weird Medieval Guys podcast is brought to you by Olivia, the creator of internet sensation Weird Medieval Guys, and Aran, a historian and fellow weird guy connoisseur.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
History Impossible

Alexander von Sternberg

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
History Impossible covers some of the less-known, strange, and supposedly impossible events, people, and ideologies throughout history that are all nonetheless true. The settings and time periods range from the Second World War to ancient Japan to medieval Europe, and many more. The show engages with difficult ideas and impossible decisions that were made by human beings like you or me, always to significant effect. It goes out of its way to grant agency to all of its subjects and does its b ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
The Exploress

Kate J. Armstrong

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Join us as we time travel back through history, exploring the lives and stories of ladies of the past, from the everyday to the extraordinary, imagining what it might have been like to be them.
  continue reading
 
From the Norman Invasion to the War of Independence, the Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through the most fascinating stories in Ireland's past. Whether it’s the siege of Dublin in 1171 or gun battles in the 1920s, the podcast vividly recreates a sense of time and place. Each episode is meticulously researched creating character driven narratives that are engaging and accessible for all. Since the first episode was released back in 2010, the podcast has covered scores of fascin ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Footnoting History

Footnoting History

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
  continue reading
 
Why did kings and queens have spectators on their wedding night? Who had the very first boob job? And did our ancestors have their unmentionables pierced? Join historian, Kate Lister, Betwixt the Sheets as she unashamedly roots around the topics which seem to have been skipped in history class. Everything from landmark LGBTQ+ court cases, to political scandal, to downright bizarre medieval cures for impotence. The etymology of swear words, gender bias in medicine, and satanic panic and cults ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Discover what Vikings did when they were at home in this fun medieval history and literature podcast about the Icelandic sagas. Hosted by two medieval literature professors with beards.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Beheaded

Megan Moore & Elizabeth Black

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Torture. Execution. Death. Listen as two die-hard fans chat about some of history's most gruesome death sentences. From famous queens and kings to the uncommon names in history, no conviction will be left untouched. Try not to lose your head over this comical approach to the shocking and disturbing stories of treason and crime (whether found guilty or not).
  continue reading
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Step into a world of knights, castles, and epic adventures and immerse yourself in exciting stories, filled with chivalry, honor, and timeless wisdom. From the enchanting realms of Camelot to the treacherous battles of the Crusades, we explore literary masterpieces that transport you to a bygone era. Whether you're a history buff or simply love a good story this is your gateway to all things medieval literature. Grab a cup of mead, cozy up in your favorite spot and let's journey through the ...
  continue reading
 
The Medieval Archives podcast transports you back to an age of heroic kings, gallant knights and pious bishops. Separate fact from fiction and find out how the men and women of the middle ages really lived.
  continue reading
 
Renaissance England was a bustling and exciting place...new religion! break with rome! wars with Scotland! And France! And Spain! The birth of the modern world! In this twice-monthly podcast I'll explore one aspect of life in 16th century England that will give you a deeper understanding of this most exciting time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
  continue reading
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages. If you would like to support my work directly, you can kindly do so here: www.patreon.com/warlordsofhistory
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
A Slice of Medieval

Sharon Bennett Connolly and Derek Birks

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Derek Birks is an #historicalfiction author who is interested in all matters historical. Sharon Bennett Connolly is a #medieval #historian who writes mainly about women.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Abbasid History Podcast

AbbasidHistoryPodcast.com

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
An audio platform for the study of the pre-modern Islamic(ate) past and beyond. We interview academics, archivists and artists on their work for peers and junior students in the field. We aim to educate, inspire, perhaps infuriate, and on the way entertain a little too. https://linktr.ee/abbasidhistorypodcast Suitable also for general listeners with an interest in geographically diverse medieval history.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Way of the Fathers

CatholicCulture.org

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
A podcast about the Fathers of the Church—the foundational figures in Christian history. A production of CatholicCulture.org. Seasons 1-3 were hosted by Mike Aquilina. Season 4 is hosted by Dr. Jim Papandrea. 1: The Church Fathers 2: The Early Ecumenical Councils 3: Cities of God 4: Heresies
  continue reading
 
A podcast featuring scholarly discussions about Vikings, Norse myth, & the history of medieval Scandinavia. Hosted by Noah Tetzner. Follow The History of Vikings on Twitter: @HistoryofViking Email Noah with ideas for future episodes: noah@thehistoryofvikings.com
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
A Flatpack History of Sweden

A Flatpack History of Sweden

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
A fun history podcast chronologically charting Swedish history in a light-hearted and conversational way. Each week we introduce a new step along our journey through the history of Sweden, from the Stone Age to the modern day. Vikings included!
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Echoes of History

History Hit & Assassin's Creed

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Dive into the real-life history that inspires the locations, characters, and storylines of the legendary world of Assassin’s Creed. ‘Echoes of History’, a Ubisoft podcast brought to you by History Hit, is the place where listeners can explore the narrow side streets of Medici-ruled Florence, cross sand dunes in the shadow of ancient pyramids, climb the rigging of 18th century brigs sailing across the Caribbean and meet the most powerful warlords in Feudal Japan, all before stepping ‘into the ...
  continue reading
 
My name is Darrick Taylor, and I am the founder and proprietor of Controversies in Church History, a podcast that takes an in depth look at difficult, even disturbing, issues in the history of the Catholic Church. My perspective is unique, in that I am a faithful Roman Catholic, yet trained as a secular historian. Designed for Catholics but accessible for anyone interested in history, it balances storytelling with an academic sensibility.
  continue reading
 
Welcome to 'The British Food History Podcast': British food in all its (sometimes gory) glory with Dr. Neil Buttery. He'll be looking in depth at all aspects of food with interviews with special guests, recipes, re-enactments, foraging, trying his hand at traditional techniques, and tracking down forgotten recipes and hyper-regional specialities. He'll also be trying to answer the big question: What makes British food, so...British? This podcast uses the following third-party services for an ...
  continue reading
 
Ever wondered what the Crusades were and why they really happened? This podcast not only tells the full history of the Crusades, it also links them with the forgotten story of the fall of Byzantium. Listen to one of the most amazing tales ever told! Nick Holmes is a British historian, author and podcaster - check out his website at www.nickholmesauthor.com.
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
The crusade movement needed women: their money, their prayer support, their active participation, and their inspiration. Helen J. Nicholson's book Women and the Crusades (Oxford UP, 2023) surveys women's involvement in medieval crusading between the second half of the eleventh century, when Pope Gregory VII first proposed a penitential military exp…
  continue reading
 
Dating from 1467-1603, the Sengoku or ‘Warring States’ period is known as the bloodiest in Japan’s history; an era of continuous social upheaval and civil war which transformed the country. Shogun-led authority was shattered and 150 years of murder and betrayal followed as fearsome warlords ruled local territories with unflinching ruthlessness. In …
  continue reading
 
When you say ‘going medieval’ on someone, it brings up quite nasty connotations. But is this brutal suggestion a fair depiction of medieval times and their thoughts on torture and punishment? What are some of the more gruesome methods they employed? And why did Henry I give authorisation for his own granddaughter-in-law to be blinded? Joining Kate …
  continue reading
 
When will I die? What is the sex of my unborn child? Which of two rivals will win a duel? As today, people in the later Middle Ages approached their uncertainties about the future, from the serious to the mundane, in a variety of ways. One of the most commonly surviving prognostic methods in medieval manuscripts is onomancy: the branch of divinatio…
  continue reading
 
From the first fleet of convict ships arriving in Australia in 1788, sex work was a central part of the new society British colonialists were building. What was the reality for women when they arrived? What records are there of sex workers from this time? And how has sex work shaped modern Australia? Today, Kate's joined by the fantastic Rae France…
  continue reading
 
Did you know we have our medieval ancestors to thank for whisky? It wasn’t exactly a medieval invention but the process of making distilled alcohol and the idea that it might be fun to drink was. In this episode of Gone Medieval, Dr. Eleanor Janega finds out more from whisky journalist Matt Chambers about how we got from desalinating seawater in th…
  continue reading
 
Galileo Galilei stands as one of the most significant figures in the history of science and thought. But how did he gain this illustrious reputation? In today's 'Life of the Week' episode, historian of science James Hannam delves into Galileo's pioneering observations and experiments. Speaking to Danny Bird, he reveals how the dissemination of Gali…
  continue reading
 
Witnesses to the brutal murder of their families and neighbors and the violent destruction of their communities, a cadre of Jewish women in Poland--some still in their teens--helped transform the Jewish youth groups into resistance cells to fight the Nazis. With courage, guile, and nerves of steel, these "ghetto girls" paid off Gestapo guards, hid …
  continue reading
 
"The Polish Police, commonly called the Blue or uniformed police in order to avoid using the term “Polish,” has played a most lamentable role in the extermination of the Jews of Poland. The uniformed police has been an enthusiastic executor of all German directives regarding the Jews." -Emanuel Ringelblum, Warsaw, 1943. Shortly after the occupation…
  continue reading
 
Pedro Tafur, a 15th-century Castilian, makes his way around Spain and Italy with lengthy stops in Genoa, Venice, and Rome, and generally has a pretty pleasant holiday. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on BlueSky @a-devon.bsky.social, Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I…
  continue reading
 
At exactly the same time as Jack the Ripper, another serial killer terrorised London. Just like Jack the Ripper, all their victims were women - their dismembered bodies left floating in the Thames. This is the dark history of the Thames Torso Murders, a case which asks questions about what crimes we choose the remember and what ones we try our hard…
  continue reading
 
Yasuke is one of the most captivating and yet mysterious figures within Japanese history. In 1581, at the height of the civil war, he crossed paths with the country’s most powerful warlord, Oda Nobunaga. Their meeting bound the two men together and set Yasuke on a path to becoming the first known samurai of African descent in Japan. Delving into th…
  continue reading
 
Europe's peasants have all but disappeared since the end of the Second World War. Patrick Joyce has studied the past 200 years of the peasant experience, and in conversation with David Musgrove, he explores what we might learn about this vanished world. He considers what European peasant society was like, and how far peasants' world view differed f…
  continue reading
 
It's another This Week in YouTube where we highlight some recent content from my YouTube channel. This week: The Forbidden Love of Anne Vavasour and Sir Henry Lee, Eclipses in the Medieval Sky.. Make sure you're subscribed at https://www.youtube.com/@hteysko so you don't miss all the content we put out. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for mo…
  continue reading
 
In November 1647 at Corkbush field near Ware, Fairfax faced a dangerous threat to army unity - the work of the Leveller Agitators had incited some regiments to mutiny, in support of the Agreeent of the People. Meanwhile Charles had fled Hampton Court; he would find his new home even less to his liking. Until he had a strictly private discussion wit…
  continue reading
 
Millions of people flock to museums each year, eager to learn about the past and be inspired by the artefacts on display. But how old is the concept of the museum? How exactly has it shifted over time? And what controversies have plagued museums in recent years? Dr Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth talks to Jon Bauckham about the history of these remarkab…
  continue reading
 
During the Second World War, Mennonites in the Netherlands, Germany, occupied Poland, and Ukraine lived in communities with Jews and close to various Nazi camps and killing sites. As a result of this proximity, Mennonites were neighbours to and witnessed the destruction of European Jews. In some cases they were beneficiaries or even enablers of the…
  continue reading
 
The story of William and the conquest has been a long road, and I’ve heard from some of you that this season has been challenging to listen to. I get it. No matter how awful William is he never seems to face any real consequences… The post 448 – The Death of William the Conqueror first appeared on The British History Podcast.…
  continue reading
 
Is reality more than the material? Raj Balkaran holds a fascinating interview with philosopher Bernardo Kastrup on this topic. At the vanguard of the modern renaissance of metaphysical idealism, Bernardo presents cogent argumentation that reality is essentially mental, and examines the proper place of the scientific method in this deliberation. Ber…
  continue reading
 
I'm back with another interview episode! In this one I chat to Dr Sig Sønnesyn about all things Aristotle... we discuss Aristotle's theories, the nature of knowledge transmission through time, and the Aristotelian revolution in knowledge itself. And if you want to know more about the Aristotelian revolution in knowledge, you can find Sig's work on …
  continue reading
 
Adam Zientek, Assistant Professor of History at UC Davis joins Jana Byars to talk about his new book, A Thirst for Wine and War: The Intoxication of French Soldiers on the Western Front (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2024). Beginning in the fall of 1914, every French soldier on the Western Front received a daily ration of wine from the army. At …
  continue reading
 
The third season of Bridgerton is out and we are back in sexy scandalous Georgian society. But while we watch, we're taking a step back to ask: how real is Bridgerton? On this second episode in our REAL Bridgerton mini-series, we're looking at the royals and celebrities who filled the newspapers during 18th and early 19th century Britain. What was …
  continue reading
 
You've heard of Shakespeare, but have you heard of his contemporary Mary Sidney, the first person to translate the Book of Psalms into English poetry? Or what about Elizabeth Cary, who published the first original play known to be written by a woman in English? In her new book Shakespeare's Sisters: Four Women Who Wrote the Renaissance, Ramie Targo…
  continue reading
 
Welcome to Medieval Murder! Today we are discussing King Brian of Ireland and the Battle of Clontarf in the early medieval period. If you have any listener questions, comments, or topic suggestions please feel free to reach our via our instagram account @MedievalMurder or via email at info.medievalmurder@gmail.com. Also, check out our merch availab…
  continue reading
 
folks, we're back and it's time to talk about saints. tho we have often touched on the lives of various saints, we've never really talked through the whole process of canonization and how it changed quite drastically during the Middle Ages as the Catholic Church began to consolidate and centralize its power in Europe. we also talk about the types o…
  continue reading
 
The White Company, Part 4 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 💰Become a Producer; DONATE to the show via PayPal, or use Venmo You can also donate with Stripe Set during the Hundred Years' War with France, The White Company tells the story of a young Saxon man who is learning what it is to be a knight. Raised by Cistercian Monks and rejected by a violent elde…
  continue reading
 
Today, we’re joined by English Heritage historian Dr Rebecca Preston and Professor of real estate practice law, Carrie de Silva to reveal the stories of two 20th-century women who have recently been honoured with London blue plaques. During their lifetimes, both Irene Barclay and Lady Marjory Allen contributed to improving people’s lives through th…
  continue reading
 
Medieval historians are faced with the daunting task of having to piece together around a thousand years of history without all that many written sources to speak of. But what happens if it turns out that some of the most important sources we’ve been using have been - let’s say - touched up a little? This week, Danièle speaks with Thomas Smith abou…
  continue reading
 
Garden gnomes have a secret life all of their own. If you don't believe us, then go ask Paris Hilton. Today we discover the hidden history of garden gnomes and meet the eccentric aristocrat - Sir Charles Isham - who firmly believed that the mountains of the world really filled with little folk with pointy red hats and pickaxes. Our guest is Twigs W…
  continue reading
 
On 6 June 1944, the Allies began their long-awaited invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. By the end of the day, more than 150,000 men had landed in northern France, ready to start pushing further inland. But how had this immense undertaking been planned? And how long was it before they achieved their first objective? In the first episode of our new th…
  continue reading
 
How did the relationship between Anne Boleyn and Thomas Cromwell go so sour? They were once allies, and then he became the mastermind of her downfall and execution. Let's dig into their relationship and see exactly where it started to go so tragic. Check out englandcast.com/tudorcononline to have a Taste of Tudorcon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/…
  continue reading
 
In this four-part series, we're time traveling back to Tokugawa Japan (1603-1868) to find out what life was like there for the ladies. If you've been binging Shogun lately, then this one's for you! For show notes, including a list of sources and some cool images, go to The Exploress website (If you're dying for a full transcript, you'll find it ove…
  continue reading
 
Pelagius was so optimistic about human nature and the freedom of the will that he went so far as to deny the reality of original sin and the need for infant baptism. Saint Augustine corrected Pelagius and his followers, but in the heat of the debate he went a bit too far in in the opposite direction, and proposed a doctrine of election that the Chu…
  continue reading
 
This is an unedited recording of a conversation I had with the wonderful Thomas Lockley, about his new book, A Gentleman From Japan, which tells the story of Christopher, a Japanese sailor who wound up at Elizabeth's court. His journey, and the contributions he made to England, are a fascinating story, and if you want to learn more, check out his b…
  continue reading
 
At the end of the 19th century, Britain and America entered the grip of a cat craze that saw the humble moggy catapulted from urban nuisance to beloved household pet. Historian Kathryn Hughes speaks to Charlotte Hodgman about 19th-century attitudes to cats, and how Louis Wain's anthropomorphic drawings helped us fall in love with all things feline.…
  continue reading
 
The latest episode of Controversies in Church History takes a look at the early 19th century writer and apologist Francois Rene Chateaubriand (1768-1848), and his work, The Genius of Christianity. Often considered one of the first "Romantic" authors, we will take a look at Chateaubriand's life and background and how it shaped his approach to arguin…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide