show episodes
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
The Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through Ireland's fascinating past. This podcast is not just dates but an enthralling account of Ireland's history, looking at daily life through the ages. The show is currently focused on the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s (see below), while the archive contains the stories of Ireland's ancient High Kings, Viking raiders and the Norman Invasion of the Middle Ages. The story of the Great Famine has proved the most popular to date, Between 18 ...
 
Music, culture, the arts, maritime exploration - Renaissance England was an exciting place to be. So much happening! Breaks with Rome. Wars with France. And Scotland. And Spain! Twice a month, we'll look at some aspect of Renaissance England that will give you a deeper understanding into life in the 16th century. Go to http://www.englandcast.com for more info.
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
For many episodes to come, we'll be exploring the rich history of Poland. From it's humble beginnings, we'll follow the people of Poland as they form their own unique cultural identity, rise into a great European power, cross paths with the Mongol Horde, save Europe from an Ottoman invasion, and do their best to keep their independence firm from one generation to the next.
 
Sharing the History of The Viking Age, one podcast at a time. We are covering the History of Scandinavia during the Viking Age. We're exploring Raiding, Trading and Settlement of Scandinavians abroad as well as the culture and society of the Norse homelands. Join us to learn more than you ever thought you wanted to know about the people, for better or worse, history knows as the Vikings.
 
CEU Medieval Podcast is a collection of past episodes of the radio's weekly talk show 'Past Perfect!' and recorded public lectures presented at Central European University's Medieval Studies Department. Music was removed from the podcast version of the shows due to copyright regulations.
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages.
 
An audio platform for the study of the pre-modern Islamic(ate) past and beyond. We interview academics, archivists and artists on their work for peers and junior students in the field. We aim to educate, inspire, perhaps infuriate, and on the way entertain a little too. Suitable also for general listeners with an interest in geographically diverse medieval history.
 
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show series
 
With their tales of supernatural beasts, death-defying quests and dashing knights that always got the girl, romances were the must-reads of the Middle Ages. Lydia Zeldenrust reveals how – despite concerns that they were corrupting readers – medieval romances became a pan-European literary sensation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf…
 
Tweet Season 2019 / 2020 – Talk 22 – Spanish Medieval History as illustrated by the Church of San Juan de los Reyes in Toledo In the talk Spanish Medieval History illustrated by the Church of San Juan de los Reyes in Toledo Peter Duffy takes us on a journey through the Iberian Peninsula between … Continue reading "TH 19-20 T22 Spanish Medieval Hist…
 
Mary, Queen of Scots, returned to the news headlines when the rosary she carried to her execution in 1587, was recently stolen from Arundel Castle. It's the latest chapter in the enduring story of this highly romanticised figure. Mary reigned over Scotland for just over 24 years between December 1542 until her forced abdication. Considered the legi…
 
Gary: Today’s special episode is by Emma Kavanagh. Emma is a doctoral candidate in Musicology at the University of Oxford, where she is the inaugural Louis Curran scholar at Linacre College. She holds a BA from the University of Cambridge, and an MA from the University of Nottingham. Emma’s research interests focus on opera and musical culture in F…
 
COVID-19 Vaccines May Not Protect Immunocompromised People This week, California and New York, two of the states hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, announced that they were relaxing almost all coronavirus-related business restrictions. Across the country, vaccination numbers are slowly ticking up—although a troubling COVID-19 variant known as De…
 
How To Talk About Medical Marijuana With Your Doctor Over the last decade, cannabis has had a moment. Thirty-six states and Washington D.C. have legalized it for medical use. (Fifteen states, plus D.C., have also legalized weed recreationally.) Altogether, about 5.5 million people in the U.S. now have medical marijuana cards. One of the primary arg…
 
Kate Vigurs discusses the 39 female agents of the Special Operation Executive’s F-section, a diverse cohort of women recruited to carry out resistance work in occupied France during the Second World War – from wireless operation to crucial planning for D-Day. (Ad) Kate Vigurs is the author of Mission France: The True History of the Women of SOE (Ya…
 
206 years ago today, 60,000 men were slaughtered in the Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon Bonaparte's French army was finally defeated by an almighty coalition of troops from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Hanover, Brunswick and Nassau, led by the Duke of Wellington, and the Prussian army under the command of Field Marshal von Blücher. In this arc…
 
In earlier centuries, when science and spirituality were considered one and the same, the world was full of advice and warnings surrounding pregnancy cravings. In the second part of this two-part series, Ben and Noel explore how humans perceived these cravings: as superstition, stereotype and, eventually, science. Learn more about your ad-choices a…
 
In this episode we begin exploring the path blazed by Philip II of Macedon (382 - 336 BCE). A military and diplomatic genius who ushered in the Rise of Macedon, bringing Greece to its knees and that laid the foundation for the conquest to the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In order to appreciate how truly unbelievable this ascendancy was, we backtrack …
 
Human bones are one of our most valuable and illuminating sources of information about the past, but how do we use them, and what can they tell us about prehistory? I talked to Dr. Jess Beck, a bioarchaeologist and expert on later European prehistory, about the incredible insights we can glean from the study of human remains and about her specialty…
 
We’re launching a brand-new premium podcast feed, HistoryExtra Plus – a subscription channel where we take you on a deep dive into the past, with even more on history’s most gripping events. Brought to you by the team behind HistoryExtra and BBC History Magazine, HistoryExtra Plus brings you an in-depth look at history’s most exciting stories and c…
 
Erin Duncan O’Neill (Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Emery (Professor, Montclair State University) about Emery’s recent book, Reframing Japonisme: Women and the Asian Art Market in Nineteenth-Century France, 1853-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2020). Women figured prominently among the leading collectors and purveyors of Asian…
 
Winston Churchill's daughters Diana, Sarah, Marigold and Mary are often overshadowed by their father's extraordinary fame but they also lived fascinating lives and were often present at many of the seismic moments of history. Their lives were far from easy though. Marigold died at the age of two, Diana would suffer mental health problems and eventu…
 
Chrysostom means “golden mouth,” and only one man has credibly borne the title. John Chrysostom may have been the greatest pulpit preacher in Church history. In his lifetime he was also renowned for his asceticism and spiritual counsel In recent years, however, he’s been maligned — and mischaracterized — for his views on marriage and sex. Here we s…
 
DH Lawrence’s work – such as The Rainbow, Women in Love and Lady Chatterley’s Lover – broke new ground and appalled censorious literary critics. Biographer Frances Wilson chronicles a pivotal decade in the writer’s turbulent life, characterised by a tempestuous marriage, a constant battle against class prejudice and a bitter backlash against vitrio…
 
If you are an Earl, and you are sent a safe conduct pass to go talk to the King, you're safe, right? You can go meet them, and calmly discuss that alliance you made with a couple of other noblemen, one that is not in favor of the king and his kingly position. Calmly, yes, and then you can go home. Unless it's 1452, and you're in Scotland, and you'r…
 
For many people sending a postcard is an enjoyable part of any seaside trip but rather than just being a novelty they were once a vital form of communication and often the quickest way to contact your friends and relatives. Dan is joined by Chris Taft and Georgina Tomlinson from the postal museum where a new exhibition marking 151 years of the Brit…
 
Pregnancy is amazing — and scary, and beautiful, and a thousand other things. The modern world has stereotypes and tropes aplenty about pregnancy, especially including the phenomena known as pregnancy cravings. But how far back does this go? In the first part of this series, Ben and Noel explore the history of cravings, along with beliefs about how…
 
Luke and Eleanor are back to start a series on Medieval China. of course, Medieval China is so different from our general conceptions of the Middle Ages that we have to spend some time introducing Chinese history. after all, China did go through a period of serfdom, they just abandoned the practice over 200 years before the birth of Christ whereas …
 
For the concluding episode of our series on the prime ministers that experts believe accomplished most during their time in 10 Downing Street, Anthony Seldon joins us to discuss the secrets of being a great leader, and some of the challenges facing those in charge over the last 300 years. (Ad) Anthony Seldon is the author of The Impossible Office?:…
 
Emma Rothschild’s new book, An Infinite History: The Story of a Family in France over Three Centuries (Princeton University Press, 2021) (see the book’s accompanying website here: https://infinitehistory.org), is a beautiful work that, by following the lives of one obscure family over five generations, weaves together a history of France through th…
 
The Anglo-Saxon period is vital for the formation of England and the UK as we know it but is a difficult era to fully understand. The departure of the Romans left a power vacuum that was filled by warlords with violence, foreign invasion, occupation and religious strife being endemic. But out of this turbulent period the foundation of what we now c…
 
Despite being a key part of society and everyday life, medieval sexuality was probably left out of your history lessons at school. But how much do we really know about these very private aspects of life in the Middle Ages? Dr Cat Jarman is joined by historian Dr Eleanor Janega from the London School of Economics, who tells us all about medieval sex…
 
We are facing a world food crisis of unparalleled proportions. Our reliance on unsustainable dietary choices and agricultural systems is causing problems both for human health and the health of our planet. Solutions from lab-grown food to vegan diets to strictly local food consumption are often discussed, but a central question remains: how did we …
 
1561 was a pretty big year. Lightning struck. Mary Queen of Scots was headed back to Scotland. And Elizabeth's love life was a mess. We discuss it all in this episode. Show notes will be up at englandcast.com/1561 asap. Thanks so much for your support and listenership! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
We are facing a world food crisis of unparalleled proportions. Our reliance on unsustainable dietary choices and agricultural systems is causing problems both for human health and the health of our planet. Solutions from lab-grown food to vegan diets to strictly local food consumption are often discussed, but a central question remains: how did we …
 
Broadcaster and academic Alice Roberts joins us to discuss her new book Ancestors: A Prehistory of Britain in Seven Burials, which reveals what archaeological discoveries and cutting-edge science can tell us about Britain’s prehistoric past. (Ad) Alice Roberts is the author of Ancestors: A Prehistory of Britain in Seven Burials (Simon & Schuster, 2…
 
Today I speak with Martyn Whittock about Norse myths and legends. Support this podcast by visiting our sponsor Norse Tradesman. P.S. - You can save 20% off your order by using the coupon code ''VIKING'' at checkout. Referenced in Today’s Episode: Tales of Valhalla: Norse Myths and Legends Feel free to contact me with any questions, comments, sugges…
 
Through 1920 Terence MacSwiney became the most well known Irish republican across the world. Elected as Lord Mayor of Cork in March, he was arrested in August and began the longest hunger-strike in Irish history at the time. The story of this battle of wills between MacSwiney and the British Authorities proved a crucial moment in the war and is an …
 
After the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of London in 1666 London was on its knees with its population decimated and the heart of the city burnt out, but from the ashes, it would rise phoenix-like to become one of the world's dominant economic and cultural centres. Dan is joined by author Leo Hollis for a walking tour of London and they vi…
 
For thousands of years people have watched the Aurora Borealis with awe, fear and wonder and told stories to explain what created them. In this episode we look into the tales of whales and frozen swans, fires and lamps, valkyries and the spirits of the dead to see how people in the past understood the Northern Lights. Sources Aurora Zone, 'Mytholog…
 
Fóstbrœðra saga (or The Saga of the Sworn Brothers) tells the story of two men, Thorgeir Havarsson and Thormod Bersason, who are more concerned with success in this life than glory in the next. Together, they wander the countryside of 11th century Iceland causing trouble, damaging property, and taking what they want. Like Grettir, they soon find th…
 
Tim Maltin answers listener questions about the sinking of RMS Titanic in 1912 Did the band really play on as the Titanic sank into the icy depths of the Atlantic? And is it true that the liner could have stayed afloat if it had hit the iceberg head on? In the latest in our series tackling the big questions on major historical topics, expert Tim Ma…
 
Gordon Brown stood at the pinnacle of UK politics for 13 years first as Chancellor of the Exchequer and the as Prime Minister but it is as a private citizen that he now seeks to set out and help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. In this episode, Dan speaks to Gordon Brown about his time as prime minister; the power he wielded and th…
 
From the eruption of Vesuvius to Chernobyl and Covid-19, Niall Ferguson charts how disasters have changed the course of history From the eruption of Vesuvius to Chernobyl and Covid-19, disasters have changed the course of history. Historian Niall Ferguson discusses his new book Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe, which asks what we can learn from hi…
 
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