show episodes
 
Battlecast is the world’s foremost podcast about war and it’s sociopolitical impact. Each month Dr. Luke Wolf works to bring you an unfiltered understanding of the most important battles and wars of mankind’s history. The official motto of the show: “not left, not right: above,” provides a fresh look at the conventional understandings found in history books. So pull up a chair, grab a beer, and join the conversation.
 
Achtung! Achtung! Comedian Al Murray and historian James Holland discuss all matters Second World War. We Have Ways of Making You Talk is a bi-weekly show exploring the war in close up. James and Al have a stunning knowledge of their subject, but don't expect a linear narrative. The boys love a tangent and a forgotten tale. We Have Ways of Making You Talk roams down forgotten front lines, casts new villains and makes the case for unlikely heroes. Send questions to James and Al via Twitter us ...
 
A history podcast looking at all aspects of WWII, military history, social history, the battles, the campaigns, tanks, gun and other equipment, the politics and those who ran the war. I look at it all. With WW2 slipping from living memory I aim to look at different historical aspects of the Second World War. In each episode of the WWII Podcast I interview an expert on a subject. No topics are out of bounds (as yet), and I cover the military history side of the war as well as looking the home ...
 
TOP SECRET Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors technologists debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP)- stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- museum confirmed to have greatest collection of artifacts on the subject anywhere in the world -(STOP)- podcast rumored ...
 
The Irregular Warfare Podcast explores an important component of war throughout history. Small wars, drone strikes, special operations forces, counterterrorism, proxies—this podcast covers the full range of topics related to irregular war and features in-depth conversations with guests from the military, academia, and the policy community. The podcast is a collaboration between the Modern War Institute at West Point and Princeton's Empirical Studies of Conflict Project.
 
History of the Great War is a weekly podcast that will cover the First World War that occurred from 1914 and 1918. Every week we will be discussing the events that occurred exactly 100 years ago. We will journey from the borders of France in the blistering heat of 1914, to the shores of Gallipoli, to the banks of Somme, to the final knockout attempt by the German army in the spring of 1918.
 
Servicemembers from across the military, sharing their accounts of combat and survival. Hosted by sports talk radio host and Army veteran, Mark Zinno, this podcast brings you firsthand accounts of war, with a perspective you only get from someone who has lived through it. From WWII to Vietnam, Somalia, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, hear inspirational stories of service and resiliency from those who have fought on and off the battlefield!
 
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The Spear

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The Spear

Modern War Institute at West Point

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The Spear is a podcast from the Modern War Institute at West Point. It aims to explore the combat experience, with each episode featuring a guest who tells a detailed and personal story, describing the events and exploring topics like decision-making under stress and what it feels like to be in combat.
 
Explore the rich history of our past through the lens of our military institutions. From the settlement of North America to the present, this podcast encompasses traditional military history and goes the extra step to address the evolution of ideas and institutions. Join us!
 
Bletchley Park is the home of British codebreaking and a birthplace of modern information technology. It played a major role in World War Two, producing secret intelligence which had a direct and profound influence on the outcome of the conflict. The site is now a museum and heritage attraction, open daily. The Bletchley Park Podcast brings you fascinating stories from Veterans, staff and volunteers on the significance and continued relevance of this site today.
 
Walk the battlefields of the First World War with Military Historian, Paul Reed. In these podcasts, Paul brings together over 35 years of studying the Great War, from the stories of veterans he interviewed, to when he spent more than a decade living on the Old Front Line in the heart of the Somme battlefields.
 
Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign. We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.
 
History is, indeed, a story. With his unique voice and engaging delivery, historian and veteran storyteller Fred Kiger will help the compelling stories of the American Civil War come alive in each and every episode. Filled with momentous issues and repercussions that still resonate with us today, this series will feature events and people from that period and will strive to make you feel as if you were there.
 
The Battles of the First World War Podcast goes in-depth into the battles of the Great War of 1914-1918. The goal is to really go into the details of how and why these battles unfolded and happened as they did. In telling the narrative of these clashes we can revisit some of the stories of the men and women who lived, fought, and died during the first titanic struggle of the 20th Century, for these people have stories that deserve to be told.
 
The Indian subcontinent is about the size of Europe and is way more diverse and complicated - but how much do we know about its violent past? The land of Gandhi is also the land of the war-elephant, of gunpowder-wielding infantry, and of nuclear weapons that destroy everything in their wake. In Yuddha, Anirudh Kanisetti (host of Echoes of India: A History Podcast) and Aditya Ramanathan explore the darker, blood-splattered side of India, beyond Bollywood and school textbooks. From the medieva ...
 
From Napoleonic battles to Cold War confrontations, the Normandy landings to 9/11, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how wars have shaped and changed our modern world. Each week, twice a week, war historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of inspirational leadership, breakthrough technologies, and era defining battles. Together they highlight the stark realities and conseque ...
 
The Black Vault Radio with John Greenewald, Jr. dives deep into the world of secret U.S. Government and Military History spanning more than a half century. Using an archive of more than 2,100,000 declassified government documents as a starting point, Greenewald speaks to some of the most brilliant minds on the planet trying to get to the truth.
 
The Real Time History Podcast (formerly The Great War podcast) is hosted by Jesse and Flo from Real Time History. We are an independent production company known for The Great War channel on YouTube, the documentary series 16 Days in Berlin and Rhineland 45 and more. On the podcast Jesse and Flo interview historians from around the world on their topics and current publications to bring you the newest in historic research.
 
The Professional Military Education (PME) podcast is where great books on war and history are analyzed and discussed with the author. Through in depth conversations, the PME podcast seeks to promote great books that will interest serious military thinkers. For people that might be interested in military topics and history, the PME podcast will get you hooked on this awesome field of study. Through in depth reading and serious scholarship, the PME podcast is proud to bring a great history sho ...
 
In "Hardcore History" journalist and broadcaster Dan Carlin takes his "Martian", unorthodox way of thinking and applies it to the past. Was Alexander the Great as bad a person as Adolf Hitler? What would Apaches with modern weapons be like? Will our modern civilization ever fall like civilizations from past eras? This isn't academic history (and Carlin isn't a historian) but the podcast's unique blend of high drama, masterful narration and Twilight Zone-style twists has entertained millions ...
 
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show series
 
By the time of the Battle of Haldighati in 1576, the Mughals had consolidated their power over a large swathe of North India. Yet, the desire for further conquests never waned. As the Mughals transformed from a war band into an empire, their armies also mutated into gigantic earth-shaking beasts. Yet it required deft politics and a complex bureaucr…
 
Katherine Chandler's Unmanning: How Humans, Machines and Media Perform Drone Warfare (Rutgers UP, 2020) studies the conditions that create unmanned platforms in the United States through a genealogy of experimental, pilotless planes flown between 1936 and 1992. Characteristics often attributed to the drone--including machine-like control, enmity an…
 
What mistakes occurred at the operational level in the planning of the Battle of Bullecourt? What role did Gough play in the debacle? Why did he make such grievous errors of judgement? 'Bullecourt, more than any other battle, shook the confidence of Australian soldiers in the capacity of the British command; the errors, especially on April 10th and…
 
Pete and Gary look at the life and career of controversial figure Sir Hugh Trenchard, who commanded the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtub…
 
While historians continue to explore the details of the infamous Salem witch trials, another, earlier panic swept through New England -- something modern historians often refer to as the "Vampire Panic." In part one of this two-part series, Ben is joined again with guest host Alex Williams, creator of the Ephemeral podcast, to explore the brutal re…
 
On October 17, 2001, Team Alpha were dropped into the mountains of northern Afghanistan. Two of the eight appear in this week’s episode alongside the author of a new book telling the story of the first Americans behind enemy lines after 9/11 – and what a story it is. Justin Sapp was a Green Beret detailed to CIA, he would go on to be a commander in…
 
Perhaps no prediction has been as consistently made—and as consistently wrong—as the imminent death of amphibious operations. Whatever the changes in warfare and technology, the necessity of amphibious force projection endures, long outliving those who claim its time has passed. Changes in how amphibious operations are conducted, however, are just …
 
Ray McPadden is a former Army Ranger, serving with 2nd Battalion/75th Ranger Regiment. Inspired to serve after 9/11, he began his time in the Army as an Infantry Officer with the 10th Mountain Division. Between Iraq and Afghanistan, he served four combat deployments, spending nearly two years fighting along the Afghan-Pakistan border during one of …
 
Following on from last week’s examination of US General George S Patton, Al Murray and James Holland dig deeper into his writings to gain a greater understanding of his actions and ideas. Also up for discussion is Operation Jedburgh. A Goalhanger Films production Produced by Harry Lineker Exec Producer Tony Pastor Twitter: #WeHaveWays @WeHaveWaysPo…
 
Foreign fighters play an influential role in Islamic extremist groups. They tend to be more violent, more committed, and more resistant to reconciliation than their indigenous counterparts. Perhaps most significantly, they act as vectors of extremism, moving between zones of conflict, and sometimes returning to their countries of origin to instigat…
 
For more than half of its existence, members of the Marine Corps largely self-identified as soldiers. It did not yet mean something distinct to be a Marine, either to themselves or to the public at large. As neither a land-based organization like the Army nor an entirely sea-based one like the Navy, the Corps' missions overlapped with both institut…
 
Efforts to relieve the Lost Battalion and break the German hold on the Argonne Forest led to an innovative attack devised by AEF 1st Corps commander LTG Hunter Liggett. The BFWWP is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BattlesoftheFirstWorldWarPodcast. Any questions, comments or concerns please contact me through the website, www.firstworldwarpodcas…
 
On 18 October 1942, a party of Norwegian agents were dropped into Telemark, Norway, for Operation Grouse. They were part of a mission to sabotage the German nuclear weapons programme by disrupting the stockpiling of heavy water at Vemork Norsk Hydro chemical plant. Arthur Herman is on Warfare today to explore the stories of these brave Norwegians. …
 
In this episode, we finish up the story of the siege of Vicksburg. Once Grant crossed the Mississippi River with his army, it appeared that Vicksburg was doomed. In a brilliant campaign of maneuver, Grant isolated Vicksburg from the rest of the Confederacy. While worried about General Johnston's army, the Confederates were unable to coordinate a st…
 
The Continental Congress uses 1779 to debate the terms of a peace treaty or compensation for the army. They have difficulty reaching any consensus. At the same time, Congress continues to emit paper Continental dollars which no one wants to accept. The ensuing inflation threatens to bring down the economy and the war effort. ----more---- Upcoming L…
 
Following the murder of Diem there is political chaos in South Vietnam, there is a second coup within just two months as the South Vietnamese Army Generals struggle for power between themselves. This leaves support for the Government of South Vietnam even weaker among the people. President Kennedy is killed and replaced by President Johnson.…
 
The Forever War. It may be gone from Afghanistan but it’s not gone from our hearts. Our minds. Our souls. The body politic is riddled with the consequences of the last twenty years of conflict. The Department of Homeland Security is my go to. The first half of my life it didn’t exist. Now I am faced with the consequences of its disastrous policies …
 
Writer and lecturer Chris Berman joins us to discuss the Night Witches, the female soviet pilots, cultural perceptions of warfare and the lady pilots of The United States and Great Britain. Check out his latest book, A White Star in a Red Sky. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices…
 
In late 2001, Scott Neil was a US Army Special Forces soldier whose team was among the first US forces in Afghanistan—the legendary Horse Soldiers who led some of the opening operations in the war there, just weeks after the 9/11 attacks. While theirs is a well-known story, Scott’s military service extends well beyond that experience. In this episo…
 
In his new book International Courts and Mass atrocity: Narratives of War and Justice in Croatia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) Ivor Sokolić explores the effects of international and national transitional justice in Croatia, and in particular the consequences of the work of the United Nations’ International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, …
 
After marrying and having three children, Ada dove back into the world of poetical science, continuing her correspondence with Charles Babbage as he tried to garner support for his ambitious, expensive analytical engine. In the second part of this two-part series, the guys explore how Ada's work -- and prescience -- created a profound legacy that r…
 
Before the outbreak of war, the US Navy and the Marines had put considerable effort into developing a doctrine to support amphibious operations from ship to shore gunfire. When the marines landed on Tarawa in November 1943, it would be the first serious test of this doctrine. In this episode, I’m joined by Donald Mitchener to discuss the doctrine a…
 
Lt. Col. Thomas D. Ferran III volunteered to be a part of the first group of trained Marine Corps snipers in the Vietnam War. He spent almost all his time in the field, accompanying various infantry units on their missions. Ferran describes sniping as a personal business, that is simultaneously an art, and a hunt. He was a co-founder and former pre…
 
Interview with award winning author Nathaniel Philbrick. We discuss his new book, Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Book: Travels with George: In Sea…
 
Follow Colin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Colin_A_Fisher Great War Group Introductions #5 Poetry and the War - https://greatwargroup.com/product/gwg5/ Selected Readings: Dead Man's Dump by Isaac Rosenberg - https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47411/dead-mans-dump Peace BY RUPERT BROOKE - https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/1…
 
There are few stories more extraordinary than that of General Stanisław Sosabowski, commander of the Polish Parachute Brigade. After fighting fiercely against the German invaders of Poland he was captured, escaped and made his way to Britain. He later led his men at Market Garden and is perhaps most widely known for being played by Gene Hackman in …
 
After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the U.S. Marine Corps set out to create the first two battalions of Marine Raiders. These well-trained, elite commando units quickly proved themselves better than the best Japanese troops on Guadalcanal and on the surrounding islands known as Tulagi and Makin Atoll. Two more battalions were…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
Join Eirik on a virtual tour spanning years in the thousands, but all in one spot: Avaldsnes on the isle of Karmøy. Norway's birthplace, at least if the local tourist board has anything to say about it. An episode of nostalgia and archaeo-historical hypersaturation in an ancient center of power where myth, legend, and history intersect.Support Brut…
 
This is a big one, a very big one: our 500th episode & 15th anniversary We have come a long way since we began back in 2006 – it’s quite fitting then, that in this week’s episode I speak to our very first historian and curator, Alexis Albion, who is currently the Curator for Special Projects here at the Spy Museum Alexis actually left us way back w…
 
Today Ada Lovelace is hailed as one of the most important figures in the early history of computing -- but, during her childhood, her mother was worried she might take after her father, the famous poet (and infamous philanderer) Lord Byron. Learn more about Ada's childhood in part one of this two-part series. Learn more about your ad-choices at htt…
 
From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East. The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', …
 
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