show episodes
 
The Ottoman Empire lasted for six hundred years and dominated the Middle East and Europe, from Budapest to Baghdad and everything in between. The sultans ruled three continents. But they didn't do it on their own. This podcast looks at the cast of characters who made the empire run: the sultan, the queen mother, the peasant, the janissary, the harem eunuch, the holy man, and the outlaw.
 
For many episodes to come, we'll be exploring the rich history of Poland. From it's humble beginnings, we'll follow the people of Poland as they form their own unique cultural identity, rise into a great European power, cross paths with the Mongol Horde, save Europe from an Ottoman invasion, and do their best to keep their independence firm from one generation to the next.
 
"The Visual Past” showcases the latest research by scholars who explore the visual, spatial, and material culture that shaped the Ottoman world. The series will address not only objects, images, and calligraphy, but also works of architecture that were themselves contexts for other media. Before being designated historical landmarks or enshrined in museum displays, these rich artistic and architectural products constituted an intrinsic part of Ottoman life, intersecting with and affecting al ...
 
"Women, Gender, and Sex in the Ottoman World" is a series of podcasts that pulls together women’s history and the history of gender and sex in the Ottoman Empire and beyond. It explores the particular historical experiences of women and girls based on the conviction that returning the lives, experiences, and ideas of women to the historical record will change the way we look at historical periods and transformations at large. It also investigates the ways in which gender and sexuality can se ...
 
Law is a powerful lens for the study of the Ottoman Empire and the Islamic world. Bringing together diverse sources and new perspectives for legal history, this series explores law in and around the Ottoman Empire as a complex and capacious system underpinning the exercise of power inherent in all human relationships. Our presenters study the law to gain entry into the Ottoman household, exploring the relationships between husbands and wives, masters and slaves. Others use the legal system t ...
 
Join Christine Marie and Julie for a slice of Life with The Girlfriends. This mother/daughter coaching duo shares their everyday thoughts on relationships, family, hot topics and current events, and anything that tickles their fancy with warmth, wit, and wisdom. They welcome a wide range of guest to their den for some juicy conversation. So grab a cup of anything and put your feet up on the ottoman next to the fireplace. And join the girlfriends up close and personal for some daily chat that ...
 
SHIELDS HIGH: The Battles That Saved Western Civilization From nationally syndicated radio host Buck Sexton, a new podcast that looks at the epic struggles that- had they gone the other way- could have extinguished the western world as we know it. From the Persians of Xerxes to the Janissaries of the Ottoman Sultan, on many occasions vast and powerful forces nearly conquered the Western world before it ever could be realized. It was only through the valiant last stands of armies led by champ ...
 
This podcast is dedicated to exploring issues in some more depth and untangling the complexities of the world around us. We engage thinkers, academics, and scholars in conversation on a number of themes to appreciate the ideas that make up Islam as a system of thought. Follow us on https://www.thinkingmuslim.com/ And twitter @thinking_muslim https://twitter.com/thinking_muslim Email info@thinkingmuslim.com
 
David S. Goyer and cast members Tom Riley, Blake Ritson and Eros Vlahos discuss Da Vinci's Demons. Following the untold story of genius Leonardo Da Vinci during his early years, the final season sees the artist, inventor and swordsman confronted with an Ottoman invasion, betrayal, a Roman Crusade and a series of grisly murders. Hosted by Boyd Hilton at the Apple Store, Covent Garden in London.
 
Brought to you by the Liberal Arts Collective at the Pennsylvania State University, “Unraveling the Anthropocene” brings together academics, artists, activists, and community members from around the world to discuss issues at the intersection of race, environment, and pandemic.
 
For most of us, our knowledge of the Ottoman Empire can be summed up to two things: padded footstools and the phrase "the sick man of Europe". We in the United States know very little about the Ottoman Empire because our history courses do a bad job of covering parts of the world outside of Europe and North America. But there are good reasons to learn about the Ottomans. They ruled for six hundred years, a superpower on three continents. A diverse and multiethnic empire, they were noted for ...
 
Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
 
Why don't women's clothes have more pockets? When and where did someone decide that men shouldn't wear skirts? How does a girl go about seizing control of an evil empire? Did the Amazons really exist and why wasn't I born as one of them? In short, what have the women of the world been up to while not getting covered in the standard history books? I explore these and other questions in this thematic approach to women's history.
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages.
 
Akbar’s Chamber offers a non-political, non-sectarian and non-partisan space for exploring the past and present of Islam. It has no political or theological bias other than a commitment to the Socratic method (which is to say that questions lead us to understanding) and the empirical record (which is to say the evidence of the world around us). By these methods, Akbar’s Chamber is devoted to enriching public awareness of Islam and Muslims both past and present. The podcast aims to improve un ...
 
Coping with coronavirus’ fruits of boredom? Well, make our Asia House Arts In Isolation series your favourite playlist and belt them out — and open a window so others can hear.Pretty much everything from the Louvre to the NBA has been closed, cancelled or postponed. But it takes more than that to really cancel culture. Because if you can’t visit art, we bring it to you. We can still remain connected to the creative voices who help us make sense of our times.
 
Jerusalem Unplugged is the only podcast dedicated to Jerusalem, its history, and its people. Dr. Roberto Mazza is interviewing scholars, activists, politicians, artists, journalists, religious men and women, and everybody that in one way or another is connected to Jerusalem. Podcasts will bring you closer to the city and understand its complex layout and they uncover a wealth of knowledge. You will hear about a Jerusalem you never heard of. Support the Podcast at https://supporter.acast.com/ ...
 
We are a slightly mad, always fun podcast bringing you all the History you love and a lot that you didn‘t know you‘d love until you heard it here! Recommended by BBC Radio, and presented by acclaimed historian Alexandra Churchill, with Matt Bone and Zack White.
 
This reading is in Hebrew.Yosef Haim Brenner (1881-1921) was a Ukrainian-born Hebrew-language author, one of the pioneers of modern Hebrew literature. Born to a poor family, Brenner grew up in grinding poverty. Brenner immigrated to Palestine (then part of the Ottoman Empire) in 1909. He worked as a farmer, eager to put his Zionist ideology into practice. Later he devoted himself to literature and teaching at the Gymnasia Herzliya in Tel Aviv. He was murdered in southern Tel Aviv in May 1921 ...
 
We often overlook Islamic history as a learning tool. The history of Islam is not only important for Muslims, but important for everyone. Islam and the people who call themselves Muslims have made an enormous impact on our world. The Islamic History Podcast is about discovering that history in a fun and interesting way.
 
A
AnthroPod

1
AnthroPod

Society for Cultural Anthropology

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
AnthroPod is produced by the Society for Cultural Anthropology (http://www.culanth.org). Each episode, we explore what anthropologists and anthropology can teach us about the world and people around us.
 
News and music of the Turkish speaking world including: Azeri, Bashkir, Bashkurd, Baskurt, Chuvash, Gagauz, Kazakh, Kirgiz, Kyrgyz, Ozbek, Sakha, Tatar, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuva, Uyghur, Uzbek,Altai, Azerbaijani, Balkar, Chagatay, Cuman, Crimean Tatar, Karachay, Karaim, Khakas, Kumyk, Nogay, Old Uyghur, Orkhon, Ottoman, Shor, Tofa, Tuvan, Yakut, Yellow Uyghur
 
Loading …
show series
 
Marc Baer joins us for a fascinating jaunt through 300 years of imperial Ottoman history. But Marc's book, The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars and Caliphs, at our very own Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781473695702 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, join the fun on Patreon: https://www.patreon…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
Yonca Köksal on “The Ottoman Empire in the Tanzimat Era: Provincial Perspectives from Ankara to Edirne” (Routledge). The book compares the empire's modernising, centralising reforms of the 19th century in the Balkan province of Edirne and the central Anatolian province of Ankara. Become a member to support Turkey Book Talk. Members get a 30% discou…
 
Katherine Chandler's Unmanning: How Humans, Machines and Media Perform Drone Warfare (Rutgers UP, 2020) studies the conditions that create unmanned platforms in the United States through a genealogy of experimental, pilotless planes flown between 1936 and 1992. Characteristics often attributed to the drone--including machine-like control, enmity an…
 
Perhaps no prediction has been as consistently made—and as consistently wrong—as the imminent death of amphibious operations. Whatever the changes in warfare and technology, the necessity of amphibious force projection endures, long outliving those who claim its time has passed. Changes in how amphibious operations are conducted, however, are just …
 
Countering the traditional narrative of "migration as crisis," Global Nomads tells the story of a group of people for whom migration is not a symptom of a disordered world, but rather an ordinary practice full of social and personal meaning. Decentering migration from North America and Europe, this ethnography explores how ethnic Fulbe people in th…
 
For more than half of its existence, members of the Marine Corps largely self-identified as soldiers. It did not yet mean something distinct to be a Marine, either to themselves or to the public at large. As neither a land-based organization like the Army nor an entirely sea-based one like the Navy, the Corps' missions overlapped with both institut…
 
The first part of our first two parter sees us wandering around the English countryside once more. Stonehenge has intrigue, mystery and massive stones moved around without the invention of the wheel. For more info check out the English Heritage site. For all that good stuff head on over to destinationhistorypod.com Included links: Stone techniques …
 
(Lucy) How did Ivanhoe become a wildly popular school text? And what happened to the interpretation of the text when it did? Across the Anglophone world, Scott’s medieval England became reified as a time and place of chivalric adventure, despite the novel’s often ironic tone and often pointed social criticisms. This episode examines how Sir Walter …
 
In his new book International Courts and Mass atrocity: Narratives of War and Justice in Croatia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) Ivor Sokolić explores the effects of international and national transitional justice in Croatia, and in particular the consequences of the work of the United Nations’ International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, …
 
Muslim South Asia is widely characterized as a culture that idealizes female anonymity: women's bodies are veiled and their voices silenced. Challenging these perceptions, Siobhan Lambert-Hurley, University of Sheffield, highlights an elusive strand of autobiographical writing dating back several centuries that offers a new lens through which to st…
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
A century ago, it was a given that a woman with a college degree had to choose between having a career and a family. Today, there are more female college graduates than ever before, and more women want to have a career and family, yet challenges persist at work and at home. This book traces how generations of women have responded to the problem of …
 
In his new book International Courts and Mass atrocity: Narratives of War and Justice in Croatia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) Ivor Sokolić explores the effects of international and national transitional justice in Croatia, and in particular the consequences of the work of the United Nations’ International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, …
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
Between 1940 and 1946, thousands of Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust. In Survival on the Margins: Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Sov…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
Author Annie Garthwaite joins Charlotte and Boney to discuss the incredible Cecily Neville, mother of Edward IV and Richard III and the subject of her new novel, Cecily, which views the Wars of the Roses through the incredible woman history has pushed out of focus. Buy Cecily by Annie Garthwaite at our very own bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.or…
 
In this episode the co-editor of the Jerusalem Quarterly Alex Winder tells us about the history of this very important publication, a mix of essays and scholarly written articles about Jerusalem that cover various disciplines and historical periods. The conversation moved then to discuss police and policing in British Mandatory Jerusalem. With Alex…
 
From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East. The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', …
 
Between 1918 and 1921, over a hundred thousand Jews were murdered in Ukraine by peasants, townsmen, and soldiers who blamed the Jews for the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. In hundreds of separate incidents, ordinary people robbed their Jewish neighbors with impunity, burned down their houses, ripped apart their Torah scrolls, sexually assaulted…
 
One quarter of all Holocaust victims lived on the territory that now forms Ukraine, yet the Holocaust there has not received due attention. John-Paul Himka's Ukrainian Nationalists and the Holocaust: OUN and UPA's Participation in the Destruction of Ukrainian Jewry, 1941-1944 (Ibidem Press, 2021) delineates the participation of the Organization of …
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login