show episodes
 
The New Thinkery is a podcast devoted to political philosophy and its history, along with its many guises in literature, film, and human experience generally. Named after Socrates’ infamous “Thinkery” in Aristophanes’ Clouds, The New Thinkery strikes a balance between the seriousness of academia and the playfulness of casual conversation among friends.
 
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The Republic of Middle Aged Men.

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The Republic of Middle Aged Men.

Tim, Lachlan and Reuben (All Certified Middle aged Men)

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Plato, Socrates, Epictetus, Seneca and more. This is The Republic of Middle aged men Podcast. We are 3 real world mates, all of which are wanting to work through Philosophy classics, as well as generally hanging out and chatting about life as Middle aged Men. We hope you enjoy hanging out with us. www.therepublicofmam.com
 
Good in Theory is a podcast about political philosophy and how it can help us understand the world today. Want to know what's in Plato's Republic or Hobbes's Leviathan but don't want to read them? This is your pod. I explain my favourite books in political theory in enough detail that you’ll feel like you read them yourself. Deep but not heavy. No experience needed.
 
Doze off to classic stories with Sleepy. Each week, baritone host Otis Gray reads old books in a low, rhythmic tone to lull you into a deep slumber so you can have a fresh start the next day. Sweet dreams. Zzzzzz
 
The most influential biographies ever written, admired by leaders, creators, soldiers, and thinkers for nearly 2,000 years: Plutarch’s Parallel lives. Essential listening for anyone striving after greatness. Alex Petkas, former professor of ancient philosophy and history, revives and dramatically retells these unforgettable stories for modern audiences. The subjects are statesmen, generals, orators, and founders; pious and profane, stoics and hedonists. The stakes bear on the future of Weste ...
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
The Republic is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato around 380 BC concerning the definition of justice and the order and character of the just city-state and the just man. It is Plato's best-known work and has proven to be one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political theory. In it, Socrates along with various Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and examine whether or not the just man is happier than the unjust man by consi ...
 
This is an incomplete dialogue from the late period of Plato's life. Plato most likely created it after Republic and it contains the famous story of Atlantis, that Plato tells with such skill that many have believed the story to be true. Critias, a friend of Socrates, and uncle of Plato was infamous as one of the bloody thirty tyrants. (Summary by Kevin Johnson)
 
Plato's Republic is a Socratic dialogue which deals mainly with the definition of justice, the characteristics of a just city state and the just man. Although it was written more than two thousand years ago, many of the ideas and thoughts expounded here are still very much relevant to modern society. This is Plato's best known work and is also considered his most influential especially when it comes to the fields of philosophy and political theory. The Republic is divided into ten books and ...
 
The Thomas Jefferson Hour features conversations with Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, as portrayed by the award-winning humanities scholar and author, Clay Jenkinson. The weekly discussion features Mr. Jefferson’s views on events of his time, contemporary issues facing America and answers to questions submitted by his many listeners. To ask President Jefferson a question, visit our website at jeffersonhour.com
 
Hosted by Ty Kramer-Watson Welcome back to 'A Social Experiment,' a show covering all things human philosophy. Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Hegel and many other philosophers dealing in the intricacies of human existence will be featured in this podcast. Join us, and semper audire. RoRo & co.™ Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/asocialexperiment/support
 
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Ergo Sum

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Ergo Sum

Austin Liu Mello

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Ergo Sum is an amateur's review of the history of philosophy. It's an ethics-first political philosophy discussion among friends. A lighthearted exploration of the human condition. My little contribution to the Great Conversation. Big ideas. Bigger mouths.
 
Ever had an existential crisis in the middle of the night or during your afternoon work routine? Well, I am here to help you out with it. With answering interesting questions like 'Why do we exist', 'What's my purpose in Life', 'Am I a good human being' and many more, this podcast is for anyone even remotely interested in Philosophy. Here, we breakdown critical thinkers and present you with a simple yet reliable explanation!
 
Welcome to A Passion for Learning, sponsored by the Provost’s Office of Mount St. Mary’s University. A Passion for Learning draws on the ideas and interests of Mount St. Mary’s faculty, students, and alumni who are “inspired by a passion for learning.” We believe that the cultivation of our intellectual life will make us better people, looking for greater understanding and becoming more compassionate, to the end that we can “lead lives of significance in service to God and others.”
 
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show series
 
Imagine you could start from scratch and create the ideal city. How would you design it? Who would be in charge? This thought experiment was explored almost 2,400 years ago in the Republic, a text written by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. Plato poses this hypothetical in order to get a deeper understanding of justice and human behavior and wh…
 
How does a great commander handle being undermined by his government back home? How should we treat opponents we defeat? And how do we negotiate the best deal when our backs are against the wall and our counterparts know it? In this episode: Sulla goes to Greece, to war against Rome’s arch rival Mithridates of Pontus. Can he hold out against a vast…
 
This week, we discuss Clay Jenkinson's upcoming cultural tour through Thomas Jefferson’s France stopping in Paris, to Nice along the Cote d’Azur, the French Alps to the village of Saorge and continue in Jefferson’s footsteps with stops in Orange, Pont du Gard, and finally Nimes and the Maison Carrée, which Jefferson called “the most precious morsel…
 
Although the Epistle of Barnabas may be best known for its Two Ways Tradition or its anti-Jewish use of Scripture, its contents reveal much that will be of interest to anyone studying Christian origins. In keeping with other contributions to the Apostolic Fathers Commentary Series, Jonathon Lookadoo's book The Epistle of Barnabas: A Commentary (Cas…
 
Nomads: The Wanderers Who Shaped Our World (W. W. Norton & Company, 2022) by Anthony Sattin tells the remarkable story of how nomads have fostered and refreshed civilization throughout history. Moving across millennia, Nomads explores the transformative, sometimes bloody, sometimes peaceful and symbiotic relationship between settled and mobile soci…
 
In this episode of New Books in Buddhist Studies, Dr. Richard Salomon speaks about his book The Buddhist Literature of Ancient Gandhāra: An Introduction with Selected Translation (Wisdom Publications, 2018). One of the great archeological finds of the 20th century, the Gandhāran Buddhist Texts, dating from the 1st century CE, are the oldest Buddhis…
 
How do we get Fortune on our side? What are the qualities necessary for daring unthinkable, unspeakable acts? When is it justifiable to massacre your enemies? Sulla: A man of contradictions. Enjoyer of dramas and hedonistic pleasures; most successful general of his generation, and one of the greatest of all time. Patriot and champion of the ancient…
 
In August, President Biden met with a group of historians at the White House who, for nearly two hours, provided historical perspectives as well as their concerns about the dangerous state of democracy in the United States and the world. Clay Jenkinson and Lindsay Chervinsky discuss this meeting and share some of the things they would have said to …
 
In 399 BC, the Greek philosopher Socrates was on trial. He believed in free-thought and sought truth by questioning everything, including society. And the Athenian government decided he was dangerous. Plato’s Apology is a first-person account of Socrates’ trial written in the form of a “dialogue,” an exploration of philosophical ideas through real …
 
The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how …
 
In mythology and the study of folklore and religion, a trickster is a character in a story who exhibits a great degree of intellect or secret knowledge and uses it to play tricks or otherwise disobey normal rules and defy conventional behavior. Today I speak with Dr. Shepard Siegel, author of the recently published book titled Tricking Power into P…
 
Despite decades of research into the historic settlements of Mainland Southeast Asia, our understanding of the region’s long-term settlement history remains incomplete. We know, for example, that mainland Southeast Asia was home to the world’s most extensive pre-industrial low-density urban complex at the site of Greater Angkor in Cambodia – but we…
 
In this episode of The New Thinkery, David and Alex have temporarily replaced Greg with Alex's mother, Fereshteh, who is an expert on Marcel Proust's mammoth 4,000+ page text, In Search of Lost Time. In the episode, the group discuss the first volume of the text, Swann's Way, analyzing the circuitous structure and style of writing utilized, as well…
 
We're joined by longtime contributor to the show, author Joseph Ellis. He and Clay Jenkinson discuss the passing of the noted historian David McCullough. They also discuss the Constitution and what might happen if it is ever re-written. Clay will be performing as Theodore Roosevelt in Downers Grove, IL on October 22nd. Subscribe to the Thomas Jeffe…
 
Most of our information about Herod the Great derives from the accounts found in Josephus' Jewish War and Jewish Antiquities. Together they constitute a unique resource on one of the most famous personalities of ancient history. But from where did Josephus get his information? It is commonly agreed that his primary source was Nicolaus of Damascus, …
 
Welcome to the Republic of Middle Aged Men, Episode 36. This week we discuss our thoughts after our read through of The Enchiridion, by Epictetus. We really enjoyed this book and we hope you have as well. The next book we will read together in season 3 is listed below via Amazon. We are reading the Trial of Socrates in Season 3. We are 3 real world…
 
The book of Exodus played a significant role in forming the identity of the Jewish people, with exodus traditions appearing throughout the Hebrew Scriptures. As the paradigmatic act of redemption, the exodus event is featured prominently not only in Israel’s prophetic corpus, but also in literature throughout the Second Temple period. The storyline…
 
This week, the guys are joined by Damian Jungerman, a former US serviceman turned intellectual with a seriously impressive résumé. Jungerman details how great books saved him and how those great books continue to be a source of immense value, as well as sharing candid stories from the battlefield.By The New Thinkery
 
Clay Jenkinson speaks with David Swenson about the ethnomusicologist Frances Densmore and her work with the Lakota in the Dakotas beginning in 1911. David has spent the last year working on The Densmore Repatriation Project, recataloging and restoring her wax cylinder recordings. Subscribe to The Densmore Repatriation Project on YouTube to hear the…
 
Twitter - https://twitter.com/CritoGlaucon It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion, it is easy in solitude to live after our own, but the great man is he, who in the midst of the crowd, keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude - Ralph Waldo Emerson The third episode of our four-part series on Baruch de Spinoza tak…
 
War tends to bring out the human propensity for atrocity. Nobody likes indiscriminate killing, torture and so on. What to do about it? One response is to avoid war altogether. According to Yale prof Samuel Moyn, that’s what most people wanted after World War II and after Vietnam. But more recently, he’s noticed a shift. Now, politicians, especially…
 
Peach Blossom Spring (桃花源记) is a short prose fable written by China's best known poet during the six dynasties period, Tao Yuanming (陶渊明). Joining us today is Dr. Wendy Swartz, professor of Chinese literature at Rutgers to share her knowledge with us on the subject. Prof. Swartz is the author of Reading Tao Yuanming: Shifting Paradigms of Historica…
 
Dr. Lindsay Chervinsky and Clay Jenkinson discuss the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Clay will be performing as Theodore Roosevelt in Downers Grove, IL on October 22nd. Subscribe to the Thomas Jefferson Hour on YouTube. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn…
 
The Iliad is among the oldest surviving works of literature, but for a long time The Iliad wasn’t written down. It’s a story that has influenced the world for over three thousand years, but for the ancient Greeks, it was history. One man, Homer, is credited with writing The Iliad, but it’s more likely that The Iliad was composed by many ancient sto…
 
The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. The Lif…
 
Welcome to the Republic of Middle Aged Men, Episode 35. This week we continue our read through and discussion of The Enchiridion, by Epictetus. We cover parts 44 to the end this week as we work our way through this Stoic Philosophy classic. This book finishes strong and points back to the man, the myth, Socrates, which we are very happy with. We ar…
 
Clay Jenkinson speaks with Beau Breslin, author of A Constitution for the Living: Imagining How Five Generations of Americans Would Rewrite the Nation's Fundamental Law. The book examines an idea that Jefferson shared with James Madison in 1789: "What would America's Constitutions have looked like if each generation wrote its own?" Books mentioned …
 
Today is August 22nd, the birthday of one of the greatest American cartoonists George Herriman. In this episode, we will cast a critical lens on Krazy Kat’s aestheticism and defining techniques that distinguish itself as a work of art. We suggest people to get the primary text of George Herriman’s Krazy Kat’s collections, which can be accessed thro…
 
Welcome to the Republic of Middle Aged Men, Episode 34. This week we continue our read through and discussion of The Enchiridion, by Epictetus. We cover parts 34 - 43 this week as we work our way through this Stoic Philosophy classic. We are 3 real world mates, none of which are qualified in philosophy but all of which are wanting to work through t…
 
From ancient myth to contemporary art and literature, a beguiling look at the many incarnations of the mischievous—and culturally immortal—god Pan. Pan—he of the cloven hoof and lustful grin, beckoning through the trees. From classical myth to modern literature, film, and music, the god Pan has long fascinated and terrified the western imagination.…
 
Samuel J. Huntington’s 1993 “The Clash of Civilizations?” is the most assigned article in American political science. It predicts a worldwide culture war (but not the kind you're thinking of). The book became a massive bestseller, Huntington was all over TV and his theory is still talked about all the time. It made him a darling to the press but re…
 
Inventing the Alphabet: The Origins of Letters from Antiquity to the Present (University of Chicago Press, 2022) by Dr. Johanna Drucker provides the first account of two-and-a-half millennia of scholarship on the alphabet. Drawing on decades of research, Dr. Drucker dives into sometimes obscure and esoteric references, dispelling myths and identify…
 
From Octavian's victory at Actium (31 B.C.) to its traditional endpoint in the West (476), the Roman Empire lasted a solid 500 years -- an impressive number by any standard, and fully one-fifth of all recorded history. In fact, the decline and final collapse of the Roman Empire took longer than most other empires even existed. Any historian trying …
 
Clay Jenkinson and David Nicandri discuss the Enlightenment and Jefferson's many inconsistencies. Nicandri is the author of River of Promise: Lewis and Clark on the Columbia and Captain Cook Rediscovered: Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes. Subscribe to the Thomas Jefferson Hour on YouTube. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the…
 
Twitter - https://twitter.com/CritoGlaucon There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow men. True nobility lies in being superior to your former self - Ernest Hemingway The second episode of our four-part series on Baruch de Spinoza is a continuation of his key philosophical ideas and his ideas regarding epistemology. We've selected exce…
 
Hello and welcome to 'A Social Experiment' Hosted by Ty Kramer-Watson Hello good people and welcome back from the summer! I'm unbelievably excited to launch season two with a man whom I admire very much, Marcus Aurelius. He is truly exemplary as I'm sure you'll agree, if only for his pure dedication to the life philosophy that is, stoicism. Happy l…
 
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