show episodes
 
“Pod Save America” cohost Tommy Vietor thought foreign policy was boring and complicated until he got the education of a lifetime working for President Obama’s National Security Council. On “Pod Save the World,” he and former deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes break down the latest developments and bring you behind the scenes with the people who were there. New episodes every Wednesday.
 
Spies don’t talk—it’s the cardinal rule of the business. But on Foreign Policy’s podcast I Spy, we get them to open up. We hear from the operations people: the spies who steal secrets, kill adversaries, and turn agents into double agents. Each episode features one spy telling one dramatic story.
 
As the United States confronts an ever-changing set of international challenges, our foreign policy leaders continue to offer the same old answers. But what are the alternatives? In None Of The Above, the Eurasia Group Foundation’s Mark Hannah asks leading global thinkers for new answers and new ideas to guide an America increasingly adrift in the world. www.noneoftheabovepodcast.org
 
***2020 Australian Podcast Awards Finalist, Best Business Podcast*** Season 3 has begun! 💖 Join Emily Bowen and Shelley Johnson as they talk with you about your career. If you have any direct feedback, questions or wish to contact us in relation to the show, please visit www.sortyourmoneyout.com/my-millennial-career. my millennial career is part of the my millennial money podcast.
 
Since 2010, siblings and journalists Abby Martin and Robbie Martin have been doing Media Roots Radio, a political podcast with a critical eye on US foreign policy, political partisanship and what people can do to fight back. Conversational, controversial, passionate and explicit, Media Roots stands apart from the majority of podcasts coming from a similar point of view. Listen to all previous episodes on soundcloud, itunes, spotify and stitcher. All $5 and up patrons get an exclusive bonus e ...
 
The Stratfor podcast from RANE is dedicated to succinct, clear conversations on geopolitics, world affairs, national security, economics and other underlying, global trends that drive the international system. As the world’s leading geopolitical intelligence platform, Stratfor Worldview from RANE brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment.
 
Want to learn more about China first-hand, from reporters on the ground? In every episode, we take a deep-dive into a specific topic, mixing independent reporting and exclusive interviews to bring you unique insights into an emerging potential superpower. Now, we’re featuring regular updates on the coronavirus pandemic from across the country. Brought to you by the South China Morning Post.
 
The South China Morning Post political economy team analyse the latest economic data from China, delve deep into the ongoing US-China trade and tech war, and examine China's changing economic relationship with Europe, Africa and the Indo-Pacific. Hear deep background on Beijing's political machinations and how they affect policy and its global diplomacy.
 
Each episode of Why It Matters breaks down an issue that is shaping our world's future. Join host Gabrielle Sierra as she speaks with the leaders and thinkers who are facing these questions head on. Fueled by the minds at the Council on Foreign Relations, Why It Matters brings some of the world's most compelling stories home to you.
 
The story of the Iran nuclear deal; how it came together, how it fell apart, and what that means for the rest of us. Hosted by Dr. Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.
 
Undercurrents is a regular podcast series featuring interviews with Chatham House experts - and others - about the critical underlying issues which are shaping modern society. Hosted by staff from across the institute, each episode goes in-depth on a topic, looking beyond the news to explore the issues shaping global politics.
 
The Lowy Institute is an independent, nonpartisan international policy think tank located in Sydney, Australia. The Institute provides high-quality research and distinctive perspectives on foreign policy trends shaping Australia and the world. On Soundcloud we host podcasts from our events with high-level guest speakers as well as our own experts. Essential listening for anyone seeking to better understand foreign policy challenges!
 
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show series
 
Robbie brings on researcher gumby4christ for a sequel of sorts to the previous Media Roots Radio episode 'The Oswald Institute of Virology, COVID-19 Origins & US Military Biowarfare'. Just when it seemed like the Covid 'lab-leak' talk had gone away it came back with a vengeance. A series of incriminating e-mail exchanges got dumped revealing 'Gain …
 
Giovanni Mantilla’s new book, Lawmaking under Pressure: International Humanitarian Law and Internal Armed Conflict (Cornell University Press, 2020), traces the origins and development of the international humanitarian treaty rules that now exist to regulate internal armed conflict, and explores the global politics and diplomatic dynamics that led t…
 
Rituality and Social (Dis)Order: The Historical Anthropology of Popular Carnival in Europe (Routledge, 2020) is the first comparative historical anthropology of popular European Carnival in the English language, with a focus on its symbolic, religious, and political dimensions and transformations throughout the centuries. It builds on a variety of …
 
What is the relationship between Buddhism and politics? How might Buddhism be realized in this world? And how might Buddhist texts help legitimate new rulers? These questions are ably addressed in April Hughes’s Worldly Saviors and Imperial Authority in Medieval Chinese Buddhism (University of Hawaii Press, 2021). Students of Buddhism are familiar …
 
In this episode of the Nordic Asia Podcast Kenneth Bo Nielsen of the Norwegian Network for Asian Studies is joined by Htwe Htwe Thein (Curtin University in Western Australia), Michael Gillan (University of Western Australia, UWA Business School) and Kristian Stokke (University of Oslo) to analyse how international governments and businesses have re…
 
In the wake of the storming of Capitol Hill on 6 January 2021, social media platforms took steps to remove former President Donald Trump from their websites for infringing community standards. This step was welcomed by many, but also raised serious questions about the power of social media companies to limit free speech and censor elected officials…
 
Papua New Guinea has been contending with a Covid-19 outbreak that has put its fragile health system under intense pressure. Case numbers have in recent weeks stabilised but there are concerns that vaccine hesitancy and limited resources are leaving the country facing the threat of a third wave of cases.Since early 2020, Police Commissioner David M…
 
In this episode of Lowy Institute Conversations, Research Fellow Lydia Khalil talks with Stan Grant about the erosion of democracy, the impact of globalisation, and the role of liberal values in the modern world.Conversations is a Lowy Institute podcast in which Institute researchers and some of the world's leading experts delve into the big issues…
 
An election – of sorts – was held in the Islamic Republic of Iran last week. The victor: Ebrahim Raisi, a hardline theocrat who has been sanctioned by the US for his involvement in the mass execution of political prisoners. Voter turnout was reportedly low. To discuss these developments, and how the Biden administration – among others – may respond…
 
Lake Van, an interior saltwater lake in eastern Turkey, has become one of the most dangerous passages for asylum-seekers from Afghanistan. One of its deadliest wrecks in modern history occurred on June 26 last year, when 61 asylum-seekers aboard a fishing boat died after their boat capsized. Only the smuggler survived, by swimming to shore. Related…
 
President Richard M. Nixon is perhaps best known for the Watergate scandal and becoming the first U.S. president to resign. But how much more is there to that familiar narrative? Kurt Andersen joins Julian Zelizer to discuss his new podcast, Nixon at War, and the behind-the-scenes story of the downfall of America's 37th President. Kurt Andersen is …
 
Chris, Melanie, and Zack dig into Marcus Willett’s “Lessons of the SolarWinds Hack” in the latest issue of Survival. They explore the distinction between cyber espionage and cyber defense (Was it an attack? Or a hack? Does it matter?), consider the implications of the offense-defense balance (Is 100 percent defense feasible?), and review possible g…
 
Today, we're speaking with Brandon Showalter, a journalist with the Christian Post who covers the spread of transgender ideology and the ways it hurts children. The truth is, the rapid rise of gender ideology is being pushed by a small group of wealthy elites, rather than rising from a grassroots level. There's money to be made for them as well, an…
 
Mimi Lau presents a deep-dive into China's expansion plans for its new space station, its new Hubble-style telescope and its invitation for (most) nations to collaborate, as well as its timeline to develop a base on the moon in conjunction with Russia. Hear from space industry journalist Andrew Jones (@AJ_FI) and Hong Kong University space program …
 
During a pivotal few months in the middle of the First World War all sides-Germany, Britain, and America-believed the war could be concluded. Peace at the end of 1916 would have saved millions of lives and changed the course of history utterly. Two years into the most terrible conflict the world had ever known, the warring powers faced a crisis. Th…
 
On this episode of New Books in History, Jamie Kreiner, Associate Professor of History at the University of Georgia, talks about her new book, Legions of Pigs in the Early Medieval West, out in 2020 with Yale University Press. In the early medieval West, from North Africa to the British Isles, pigs were a crucial part of agriculture and culture. In…
 
During a pivotal few months in the middle of the First World War all sides-Germany, Britain, and America-believed the war could be concluded. Peace at the end of 1916 would have saved millions of lives and changed the course of history utterly. Two years into the most terrible conflict the world had ever known, the warring powers faced a crisis. Th…
 
We can sometimes forget that “India”—or the idea of a single unified entity—is not a very old concept. Indian history is complicated and convoluted: different societies, polities and cultures rise and fall, ebb and flow, as the political makeup of South Asia changes. Namit Arora, author of Indians: A Brief History of a Civilization (Penguin Viking,…
 
We can sometimes forget that “India”—or the idea of a single unified entity—is not a very old concept. Indian history is complicated and convoluted: different societies, polities and cultures rise and fall, ebb and flow, as the political makeup of South Asia changes. Namit Arora, author of Indians: A Brief History of a Civilization (Penguin Viking,…
 
This interview features Drs. Peter Bisschop (Leiden University) and Yuko Yokochi (Kyoto University) and their work on the monumental Skandapurāṇa project. Started in the 1990's, the project is aimed at creating a critical edition of the Skandapurāṇa along with documenting its variations over time as well producing important studies of the text. The…
 
During a pivotal few months in the middle of the First World War all sides-Germany, Britain, and America-believed the war could be concluded. Peace at the end of 1916 would have saved millions of lives and changed the course of history utterly. Two years into the most terrible conflict the world had ever known, the warring powers faced a crisis. Th…
 
Josh Rogin, author of Chaos Under Heaven: Trump, Xi, and the Battle for the Twenty-First Century and Washington Post columnist, returns to The Realignment to discuss the continued development of the COVID-19 Wuhan lab leak theory and what the story means for U.S.-China relations, the scientific community, media, domestic politics, and content moder…
 
In this episode of the Stratfor Essential Geopolitics podcast from RANE, Emily Donahues speaks to Evan Rees, Asia Pacific analyst for RANE. The Tokyo Olympics will go on in late July, despite Japan’s battle with the coronavirus pandemic. The decision to hold the games got mixed reactions inside and outside the country. They also happen to be schedu…
 
Climate variability can cause the mass movement of people -- but does the mass movement of people fleeing climate shocks undermine political and human security? A diverse panel of experts who explores the relationship between security challenges and climate induced migration -- both across and within borders. This episode was recorded live in front…
 
Please join Peter Osnos for a conversation on his distinguished career in journalism and publishing, including working as a foreign correspondent in Vietnam and the Soviet Union, and as a long-time editor for the Washington Post, as editor and publisher at Random House, and founder of PublicAffairs where he has worked closely with leaders in busine…
 
The Egyptian government may have assisted a Saudi hit team in the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a new investigation finds. Congress debates repealing an authorization for “forever war.” And a judge narrows the lawsuits filed over the clearing of Lafayette Square before a Trump photo op. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat…
 
Geopolitical analyst Nikola Mikovic covers a broad swath of geopolitical competition between the US, China, Russia, and Turkey from the EU and Balkans to MENA and the Caucasus. We cover the aftermath of the Nagorno-Karabakh War, recent elections in Armenia, Turkey’s expanding influence, and how Ankara will continue to spar with Russia despite being…
 
Geopolitical analyst Nikola Mikovic covers a broad swath of geopolitical competition between the US, China, Russia, and Turkey from the EU and Balkans to MENA and the Caucasus. We cover the aftermath of the Nagorno-Karabakh War, recent elections in Armenia, Turkey’s expanding influence, and how Ankara will continue to spar with Russia despite being…
 
Robbie Martin brings on prolific foreign policy journalist/writer Dave DeCamp of Antiwar.com again to talk about the increasing hysteria and fear Americans are exhibiting over China and how there is seemingly bipartisan support in DC and among the public for an aggressive stance against China. Dave and Robbie then move on to the different camps of …
 
Please join Kathy Warden as she discusses technological advancements in the aerospace and defense industry and her perspective as a CEO in the national security arena.The CEO Speaker Series is a unique forum for leading global CEOs to share their insights on issues at the center of commerce and foreign policy, and to discuss the changing role of bu…
 
President Joe Biden recently made his first trip to Europe. Between meetings with G-7 leaders and a bilateral meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin, he attended his first NATO summit. Those events offer an opportunity to assess issues of European security, and specifically the current state of NATO. To do so, John Amble is joined in this ep…
 
For over 70 years, the United States and Pakistan have navigated a challenging yet productive security relationship. While it has not always been smooth sailing, Pakistan has been and remains a critical strategic partner in a turbulent region for the United States. What is the nature of the US-Pakistan relation, how can this strategic partnership b…
 
Joining us today is Melissa Chen: a journalist, the New York editor for Spectator USA, and the managing director of Ideas Beyond Borders. Melissa is passionate about free speech and has a lot to say about China's current suppression of speech and content online and elsewhere, plus why it's a mistake to dismiss China's growing influence over our cul…
 
Silicon chips are in almost all electronics, and access to them can make or break a country’s economic future. Their production relies on complex supply chains, and during the pandemic, the world learned just how fragile these supply chains are. Many countries, including the United States and China, are investing billions of dollars to develop the …
 
John Calvin in Context (Cambridge UP, 2019) offers a comprehensive overview of Calvin's world. Including essays from social, cultural, feminist, and intellectual historians, each specially commissioned for this volume, the book considers the various early modern contexts in which Calvin worked and wrote. It captures his concerns for Northern humani…
 
World War II endures in the popular imagination as a heroic struggle between good and evil, with villainous Hitler driving its events. But Hitler was not in power when the conflict erupted in Asia—and he was certainly dead before it ended. His armies did not fight in multiple theaters, his empire did not span the Eurasian continent, and he did not …
 
World War II endures in the popular imagination as a heroic struggle between good and evil, with villainous Hitler driving its events. But Hitler was not in power when the conflict erupted in Asia—and he was certainly dead before it ended. His armies did not fight in multiple theaters, his empire did not span the Eurasian continent, and he did not …
 
World War II endures in the popular imagination as a heroic struggle between good and evil, with villainous Hitler driving its events. But Hitler was not in power when the conflict erupted in Asia—and he was certainly dead before it ended. His armies did not fight in multiple theaters, his empire did not span the Eurasian continent, and he did not …
 
Tommy and Ben discuss the results of the presidential election in Iran, regional elections in France and why Justin Bieber went to visit the French president, the impact of the Putin-Biden summit, Bitcoin use in El Salvador, the latest from Afghanistan and Hong Kong, and rumors about a Chinese spy. Then Tommy talks to Congresswoman Norma Torres abo…
 
Guest: Jeremy Kuzmarov. We talk about Jeremy’s new article in Covert Action Magazine, titled How Organized Crime Infiltrated American Business After WW II and Corrupted National Politics from Truman to Trump. In it, he talks about a book by Jonathan Marshall, titled Dark Quadrant: Organized Crime, Big Business, and the Corruption of American Democr…
 
DR Congo President Félix Tshisekedi last month traveled to the country's mining heartland in Upper Katanga to personally tell everyone that he's had enough of business as usual and that he plans to renegotiate unfair foreign mining contracts. While he didn't call out the Chinese by name, everyone knew that's precisely who was referring to given tha…
 
A conversation with one of the foremost chroniclers of American life. Author Lawrence Wright discussed his new book, The Plague Year, which tells the story of Covid-19 on a global and an intimate scale, illuminating the medical, economic, political and social ramifications of the pandemic. Lowy Institute Executive Director Michael Fullilove intervi…
 
Season 5: Inside The Box W/ BoxhoundRadio Episode 15: Shoot Your Shot, But Watch Your Mouth We live in a world now, where you can’t do anything right. Anything you do can be used against you. Let’s talk about it more. Tune in and share with a friend! Boxhound Social Media: Instagram: @boxhoundlifestyle Twitter: @boxhound_ Tiktok: @boxhoundlifestyle…
 
Adam Julian, director of international student and scholar services at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and 2021 chair of the international student and scholar regulatory practice committee at NAFSA, discusses visa challenges for foreign students and international student enrollment with the return to in-person learning this fall.…
 
After its yearslong bombing campaign, Saudi Arabia is now desperate to get out of Yemen, and ready to talk peace. This signals a potential breakthrough in the long-simmering conflict in Yemen that has led to mass humanitarian concerns, as key ports to deliver aid have been blocked during the conflict. Related: Labeling the Houthis as ‘terrorists’ m…
 
For many, America’s Cold War victory validated the country’s self-image as a “shining city upon the hill,” whose democratic ideals were worthy of emulation. More than thirty years later, as authoritarianism and ultranationalism surge around the world, it is worth asking whether a dark undercurrent of America’s international conduct is somehow respo…
 
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