show episodes
 
Crime is so commonplace that it takes something particularly shocking to be labelled the “crime of the century.” Even so, there are a lot of cases that have earned the distinction. In each episode of Crimes of the Centuries, award-winning journalist Amber Hunt will examine a case that’s lesser known today but was huge when it happened. The cases explored span the centuries and each left a mark. Some made history by changing laws. Others were so shocking they changed society.
 
We're just two broads who talk to dead people. We regularly feature guests and experts, and discuss trending and controversial topics in the spiritual community. We sometimes talk like a couple of drunken sailors, but we really do have the best of intentions and only want to educate, dispel rumors, and provide a space to explore spirit freely. Join the conversation LIVE every Wednesday night at 7pm EST on Facebook! Catch replays and exclusive After Hours episodes on YouTube. New podcast epis ...
 
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show series
 
In the summer of 1964, the first modern lottery was off to the races in New Hampshire. The “Sweeps,” as they were called, were a sensation of national interest, with lawmakers quarreling over the legality of the get-rich-quick horse race scheme and citizens from all over crossing state lines to get in on the action. The craze seemed optimistic, unt…
 
Film adaptations of true crimes have to strike a tricky balance between authenticity and drama. 1987’s Murder Ordained depicts the 1983 incidents within a small town in Kansas, where the mysterious deaths of a minister’s wife and a secretary’s husband converge. But upon its release, residents and journalists alike argued the movie left some accurac…
 
Singing his way through the 1950s and early 1960s, appealing to audiences across a segregated music industry, churning out hits of dreamy quality like “You Send Me” and inspirational fortitude like “A Change Is Gonna Come,” Sam Cooke was more than an artist. He lived – and died – a legend. So how did he end up shot in a Los Angeles motel in 1964? I…
 
Inside a modest cabin on the vast prairies of Kansas lived a family, or at least four individuals claiming to be one. The Benders were an odd bunch: grumpy Ma & Pa, mysteriously moody daughter Kate and John, who didn't even share their namesake. The 1870s were a stark time in the yet-to-be-settled, American West. Travelers on long journeys had slim…
 
Dr. Linda Hazzard was an extremely unorthodox physician, a so-called "fasting specialist" who believed food to be the cause of disease. After as many as a dozen people died under her care, her sensational trial would make headlines worldwide and expose the dangerously unregulated world of medical quackery. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast fro…
 
Selena Quintanilla was on the cusp of becoming a worldwide sensation. The Mexican American had already dominated Tejano music charts for years, but as the mid-1990s got under way, so too did her plans for an English-language album that many predicted would make her a superstar. The world was shocked when that all came to a horrifying end in March o…
 
The 1981 shooting death of Paul Witte, a father of two in Indiana, seemed to be an accident: Paul's 15-year-old son Eric said he'd tripped while holding the gun, fatally wounding his dad as he napped on the living room couch. The case was considered closed -- until a few years later when a second accident befell the Witte family. This time, police …
 
As Hollywood found its footing at the turn of the 20th century, so did a handsome young artist who'd soon be known around the world as Ramon Novarro. In his heyday, the Mexican-born actor was mentioned alongside leading men like Rudolph Valentino. But with the discovery of his battered body decades after his star had faded, Novarro became better kn…
 
In March of 1856, when a visibly intoxicated man of means boarded the Ohio Belle steamboat, the crew immediately worried that they were in for a bad trip. Still, they never could have predicted that the arrival of the man calling himself J.B. Jones would ultimately lead to two dead bodies and headlines in newspapers nationwide. "Crimes of the Centu…
 
Between 1967 and 1969, terror gripped two college towns in Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor, Michigan, as investigators discovered the mutilated corpses of seven young women and girls. The murderer -- called the Coed Killer by newspapers of the time -- seemed to be so brazen that he was taunting police by returning to crime scenes and leaving behind evidenc…
 
Hey, everyone - for Labor Day, we're re-releasing this episode all about a workplace tragedy that helped spark new regulations in the US to protect workers. Enjoy the episode and we'll be back with a brand-new story next week! WE JUST RELEASED THE FULL WEEKEND SCHEDULE FOR OBSESSED FEST!! We'll have a fully searchable schedule available on Thursday…
 
The heartbreaking murder of a small-town Pennsylvania police chief seemed like an open-and-shut case in December of 1980. After all, whoever shot Gregory Adams appeared to have left a driver's license at the scene of the crime. But investigators soon learned that the case would prove to be much more challenging to close than they ever could have im…
 
Porter Rodgers and his family was as close as royalty as one could get in the small town of Searcy, Arkansas. He was a successful doctor working at a hospital that bore his name. But on Sept. 26, 1974, everything changed when a housekeeper found Mrs. Rodgers dead in the couple's posh home. The case that unfolded was one to be among the most sensati…
 
When a haggard Alfred Packer stumbled from the Colorado wilderness in 1874, he at first said he'd been abandoned by five traveling companions who'd left him to fend for himself. But his already-shaky story quickly changed once a search party uncovered the remains of five mutilated men. Packer -- sometimes referred to by the first name "Alferd" than…
 
To countless women, Amelia Dyer offered salvation: She was a supposedly married but barren woman who offered to adopt babies whose parents (usually unwed mothers) couldn't afford to raise them properly. Dyer promised to rear the "precious" babies as her own and even offered the biological mothers the chance to visit and stay part of the children's …
 
Animal Communicators Nicole and Courtney return to SSKK for a third time! Can pets communicate to us when they're ready to cross the Rainbow Bridge? Nicole and Courtney know that they can, and they're ready to help us do it. They also help validate just how deep the connection can be between humans and animals, and how special that connection truly…
 
Around the same time the first Hillside Stranglers victims were found near Los Angeles, a young man was arrested in Ohio in an unrelated string of robberies and sexual assaults that would have strange bearing over the California cases. Billy Milligan -- who ultimately would be diagnosed as having dissociative identity disorder manifesting in 24 dis…
 
Kristen and Kimmy discuss Kimmy's first experience as a reader at ParaConn CT! We talk about some of the basics of convention and psychic fair survival, as well as the role of tarot cards and crystals while attending a convention or a fair as a medium and/or psychic reader. Grab your cup, and let's discuss! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor…
 
After Kenneth Bianchi was arrested in early 1979 on suspicion he was responsible for the so-called Hillside Stranglings near Los Angeles, he made an outrageous claim: He did kill 10 women in LA and another two in Washington state, he said, but not as Bianchi. He was a split personality and had killed them as his alter-ego, Steve. Not only that, he …
 
What did Hollywood get right about their interpretations of ghosts on-screen? What did Hollywood get wrong? Psychic Mediums Kristen & Kimmy will be discussing blockbuster movies and award-winning TV shows that got it right, and those that got it wrong. From the TV show "American Horror Story" to the movie "Ghost", let's discuss! --- This episode is…
 
The first body discovered on a California hillside in late 1977 didn't make much news, but as the body count kept growing, so did the headlines -- and the sense of panic. The slayings, soon dubbed by the media as the work of the "Hillside Strangler," had Los Angeles-area women on edge day and night. It wouldn't be until a pair of similar murders oc…
 
Is it really so important to ground yourself before engaging in any spiritual work? Why is there such a heavy emphasis on being grounded? What does it feel like when you are actually grounded and balanced? Why is it so important to be energetically balanced when working with Spirit, and what does that look and feel like? Is it possible for spiritua…
 
When news spread that a high-profile comedian was killed in a murder-suicide in 1998, the response was disbelief: Phil Hartman wasn't just famous for being funny. He was even better known for being a good-hearted guy. The shocking story behind the deaths of Hartman and his wife, Brynn, not only made international headlines, but it shook the enterta…
 
Help us welcome back very special guest, Kamran Pasha, for another great episode!! Kamran was last on the show for S01E24: Interdimensional Beings. Kristen & Kimmy plan to pick Kamran's big, beautiful brain to get more in-depth information about different dimensions, as well as the purposes those dimensions serve in the various religions that Kamra…
 
Kristen & Kimmy already covered religious ideals of the afterlife, so they'll continue the discussion from last week's episode and dive into what it means to truly find your own path and live your truth, regardless of what others have to say about it. This topic could swing wildly in either direction, so be prepared for anything to happen. Is there…
 
On Easter Sunday 1937, Ethel Gedeon discovered her sister Veronica and mother Mary murdered in their New York City apartment alongside a third victim, a man who was residing in the apartment as a boarder. As police began to investigate the crime, Veronica's career as a popular artist's model led to a manhunt for one suspect whose bizarre path to th…
 
Do religion and religious beliefs carry over to the other side after someone passes? Does a biblical heaven exist for those who are/were true believers in God? Is there a "right" or "wrong" religion? Which teachers and leaders hold "The Ultimate Truth" for those seeking to be closer to a higher power or find a greater purpose? Is organized religion…
 
When the county coroner arrived at Sam Sheppard's house in July of 1954, the pathologist was certain the case was open-and-shut: Sheppard, a headlines-courting doctor and serial philanderer, clearly had murdered his 31-year-old wife, Marilyn. Sheppard faced not one but two trials of the century in a case that reached the U.S. Supreme Court and cont…
 
When three members of the Newman family were discovered slain in 1987, residents of Anchorage, Alaska, flew into a panic. Though murders weren't rare there, the slayings were brutal and the potential suspect list uncomfortably long. The case marked the first time that an FBI profiler was allowed to testify to help explain how law enforcers narrowed…
 
The Great Depression sparked a desperation in people that led to an epidemic of kidnappings nationwide, including the 1937 abduction of Arthur Fried, a married father of one whose father owned a sand-and-gravel company. As crime writer Sarah Weinman helps explain, Fried's unusual case ultimately led to the state of New York executing two men for th…
 
In last week's episode, we covered a lot of the signs that you may be an Empath, and a few ways to help Empaths cope with the feelings that they absorb. We also give you an opportunity to feel into Kristen & Kimmy to feel what emotions you pick up on form us! We dig a little deeper into what it truly is to be an Empath, and include more ways you ca…
 
We're taking a break for the holiday, so we wanted to feature an episode from our first season you may not have heard yet. We'll be back with a new episode next week! As actress Rebecca Schaeffer rushed around her apartment to ready for the biggest audition of her career, a disturbed young man was pacing the street below, armed with a gun. Schaeffe…
 
Do you feel other people's emotions? And not in the way that most people do... Do you legitimately take on other people's emotions as if they're your own, and feel exactly what they're feeling, as if you were going through the same situation, and not understand why? If your answer is yes, what do you do from here? How do you process other people's …
 
You've probably heard of the controversial Reid interrogation technique designed to extract confessions from suspects, but did you know that the case that put that technique on the map actually elicited a wrongful confession? Rabia Chaudry, co-host of the true crime podcast Undisclosed, helps tell the story of Darrel Parker's 1956 conviction in the…
 
For this episode, we were joined by special guests Julie Adreani and her husband John, as well as Kristen's husband, Mark! Kimmy put on her "Oprah hat" and interviewed the couples LIVE to find out the intimate details, good and bad, of what its like to be married to a psychic medium. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to mak…
 
With the issue of slavery dividing America in the early 1800s, Patty Cannon told neighbors curious about the Black people they spotted secreted across her property that she was helping them escape into freedom. In reality, she was leader of a gang that kidnapped free Black people -- often children -- from the streets, forged ownership papers and so…
 
Being a member of the spiritual community, whether a psychic, medium, sensitive, or empath, poses its own unique set of potential issues when it comes to creating and maintaining relationships. Kristen & Kimmy will be discussing what some of those issues have been for them, and they also want to know how your spiritual journey has affected your rel…
 
Pharmacist-turned lawyer-turned bootlegger George Remus had been making headlines for years as one of the richest men in America thanks to his illegal booze-selling operation during the start of Prohibition. Come 1927, however, his legacy was threatened with another title: cold-blooded killer. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsesse…
 
This is a topic that Kimmy can’t wait to dive into. She's been wanting to discuss this topic for years, now. How can someone be an ex-psychic? What does life look like as someone who was "previously gifted," but chooses to ignore their abilities? Special thanks to our amazing, SURPRISE guest Jamie from Wild Souls Healing for joining the discussion …
 
Defense lawyer George Remus started to notice a new kind of client in 1919 and 1920: the bootlegger. He also noticed that those bootleggers always paid handsomely in cash. Remus, who had a background in pharmaceuticals, decided he wanted in, and within a year, he owned 35% of America's alcohol. The federal government moved quickly to shut down this…
 
What's the difference between "traditional," "contemporary," and "progressive" psychics and mediums? How can you tell the difference when you're looking to hire a psychic or medium? How do you decide which one is right for you? For the professional psychic medium, which category do you fall into? Come hang out and discuss with us LIVE! We might eve…
 
One of the biggest crimes of the 20th century was the type of heist we usually associate with the 1800s: a train robbery. In August 1963, at least 16 people managed to steal more than $7 million from a train in England. And some of them actually got away with it. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten c…
 
This show has a bone to pick true crime podcasts. Where are all the women’s perspectives? The detectives, the witnesses, the movers and shakers of any case are not always dudes. So let’s widen our framework, shall we? On Let The Women Do The Work, join host Gillian Pensavalle as she follows the stories of ten dynamic, inspiring, badass women in tru…
 
WE'RE BAAACK!! Join us as we discuss where in the world we've been for the last 6 months. SO MUCH has happened since we last hosted a show! As a thank-you to our fans for being so patient with us and hanging out in our Beyond Sensing Spirit Facebook group (you can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/beyondsskk), we'll be doing some galler…
 
When the body of a beautiful and well-dressed woman was discovered in 1877 outside of Jefferson, Texas, residents recognized her immediately -- even though they didn't know her real name. She'd been christened through gossip as "Diamond Bessie" thanks to the jewels she wore, and she'd come to town with a mysterious man who'd promptly disappeared. "…
 
It's because of revisionist history that Paul John Knowles might be better known to some listeners at the Casanova Killer, but don't be fooled: This serial killer deserves no romanticization. Knowles went on a murder spree in 1974 that's been tied to the deaths of at least 20 people -- and he apparently did it just to get famous. "Crimes of the Cen…
 
Hey, fam!! Season 2 of the Obsessed Network Original Podcast "Strange & Unexplained With Daisy Eagan" launches today! In case you aren't familiar, “Strange & Unexplained” is a podcast about all the things that make us wonder. Each week host Daisy Eagan tells the tale of something strange–sometimes it’s paranormal like a haunting or alien encounter,…
 
After her niece Ruth died in her care, Mary McKnight -- herself a grieving mother -- worried that the shock would kill her sister-in-law, so she gave her something to calm her nerves. But Gertrude died within the hour, and her husband, John, within two weeks. What could have caused the three mysterious deaths in 1903 Michigan? "Crimes of the Centur…
 
A young woman named Carrie Buck was not only deemed too unfit to raise her daughter in 1927, but the U.S. Supreme Court declared she was too stupid to procreate, period. And that decision, sparked by the so-called eugenics movement, paved the way for hundreds of thousands of people to be sterilized through the 1970s. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a …
 
Almshouses in the 19th and early 20th centuries were meant to help society's most vulnerable, but in the 1880s, one in Tewksbury, Massachusetts was accused of such shocking treatment that the governor ordered a months-long investigation that dominated headlines nationwide. Among the claims: that the skin of patients who died was tanned and turned i…
 
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