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The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a weekly, hour-long interview program featuring artists, historians, authors, curators and conservators. Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic Sebastian Smee called The MAN Podcast “one of the great archives of the art of our time.” When the US chapter of the International Association of Art Critics gave host Tyler Green one of its inaugural awards for criticism in 2014, it included a special citation for The MAN Podcast.
 
Ever get museum fatigue? That overwhelmed feeling when you try to see everything? Then, join me to discover a better way to connect with art! This podcast takes you through the experience of looking at art for minutes, not seconds. And you’ll find out the history, mystery or controversy about the work or the artist!
 
From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
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Talk Art

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Talk Art

Russell Tovey and Robert Diament

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Actor Russell Tovey and gallerist Robert Diament host Talk Art, a podcast dedicated to the world of art featuring exclusive interviews with leading artists, curators & gallerists, and even occasionally their talented friends from other industries like acting, music and journalism. Listen in to explore the magic of art and why it connects us all in such fantastic ways. Follow the official Instagram @TalkArt for images of artworks discussed in each episode and to follow Russell and Robert's la ...
 
Making connections through conversation with the art, literature, and creative work that matters to us, and the people who make it. Hosted by writer and photographer Mike Sakasegawa, Keep the Channel Open is a series of in-depth and intimate conversations with artists, writers, and curators from across the creative spectrum.
 
The Sculptor's Funeral is the only podcast dedicated to figurative sculptors living and working today. Art history, tech talk, news, and interviews for the figurative sculptor working in the Western European tradition of figurative sculpture, along with a social media forum and listener mail/questions/comments make this podcast required listening for any sculptor who knows the Fine Arts aren't dead, they just smell a little funny.
 
Interviews and Inspiration From The World of Sculpture. Join, Lucy Branch, sculptural conservator and author, as she talks to sculptors whose work can be found in public spaces. They discuss their creative journeys, their artistic practice and their shared love for all things bronze. Find the show notes at www.sculpturevulture.co.uk and download your free novel.
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
Join artist Dan Jaboor, our intrepid host, as he explores the world of visual art: painting, photography, sculpture, and even the occasional weird performance art piece. Show notes and other additional content for each episode can be found at http://DanJaboor.com/podcast
 
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Museums n'That

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Museums n'That

Leeds Museums & Galleries

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Museums n'That is the podcast for anyone who thinks that museums are boring. Hosts Meg and Sara from Leeds Museums & Galleries get to the very heart of what makes museum people tick, by asking them the questions that you actually want to know. Does Bruce Springsteen have an archive? Do you ever try any of the old clothes on? What’s the greatest city in the world? Spoiler alert: it’s Leeds.
 
The Brillo Girls is our soapbox, filled with conversation about art, life, and everything that falls in-between. As artists ourselves, we love discussing anything that perks our interests and are endlessly fascinated about the creative processes different artists go through in establishing their own creative authenticity. Join us while we navigate and share their stories, celebrating the good, the bad and the ugly. Perhaps something you thought was ordinary is really extraordinary.
 
The purpose of this podcast is to provide a level of accessibility and art appreciation previously unavailable to all audiences, especially people with visual impairments. The episodes in this podcast include verbal description of many of the pieces in the Peconic Landing Sculpture Garden in Greenport, NY.
 
Christie's ArtCasts offer video and audio gallery talks by Christie's International Specialists about fine art, antiques, wine, jewelry and watches. Learn more about upcoming sales and notable past highlights worldwide. For more information about Christie's gallery talks and worldwide auctions visit Christie's on the Web at www.christies.com
 
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2 Close 2 the Sun

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2 Close 2 the Sun

Host - Elizabeth Sher. featuring gallery artists from Mercury 20 Gallery and outside curators, experts, influencers, collectors

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subtitle: Art Obsessions. A popup podcast from Mercury 20 Gallery in Oakland, CA's arts district. We are an artist run gallery for over 2 decades with 21 members from the Bay Area. Each podcast will feature a different topic with gallery artists and outside experts, curators and influencers.
 
A Piece of Work is everything you want to know about modern and contemporary art but were afraid to ask. Hosted by Broad City’s Abbi Jacobson, this 10-episode series explores everything from Pop Art to performance in lively conversations with curators, artists and Abbi’s friends, including Hannibal Buress, Tavi Gevinson, RuPaul and Questlove. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, On the Media, Nancy and ...
 
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show series
 
Ancient sculptures at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts are getting a new look. After years of reimagining how to present the great Greek, Roman and Byzantine art, the museum has found ways to draw threads from thousands of years ago to today, using technology to deepen visitor engagement. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston reports for ou…
 
Kezia Dugdale was the leader of the Scottish Labour party from 2015 to 2017, taking on the job at a tough time following a near-wipeout defeat at Westminster. She served as an MSP for the Lothian region until 2019, and now runs the John Smith Centre for Public Service at the University of Glasgow. On the podcast, Kezia talks about her rapid rise th…
 
As Art Basel returns to Florida for the 20th anniversary of its Miami Beach art fair, Aimee Dawson, the acting digital editor at The Art Newspaper, talks to Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor, about the sales, news and talking points at the event that has become most synonymous with art-world excess. Meanwhile, after Arts Council England annou…
 
In our news wrap Thursday, a bill to prevent a railroad strike is headed to President Biden after it passed the Senate, but Senators rejected a separate measure to grant seven days of paid sick leave to workers, the Supreme Court will rule if the Biden administration's plan for student debt forgiveness is constitutional and more cities in China loo…
 
Former Vice President Mike Pence has said he's considering running for president in 2024, but he's been notably quiet about the events of January 6, saving his take for his newly released book, "So Help Me God." Pence sat down with Judy Woodruff to talk about the book, his last conversation with former President Trump and why he supported legal cha…
 
Georgia's runoff election for a U.S. Senate seat has broken records for the most people voting early on a single day. In total, more than one million people have already cast their ballots in the race between incumbent Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican challenger Herschel Walker. Laura Barrón-López has been on the campaign trail wit…
 
The U.S. military says the leader of ISIS was killed last month by anti-regime forces in Syria's southwest. It is Syria's northern border with NATO member Turkey that has the U.S. concerned about new violence. The Turkish military has been attacking Syrian Kurds, the U.S.'s partner in fighting ISIS. Nick Schifrin spoke with the Kurd's commander and…
 
The rise in homelessness is a source of major tension around the country, including in New York City, which has a larger homeless population than any other city in the U.S. This week, Mayor Eric Adams announced a new policy to try to curb the trend, but as William Brangham reports, it has also drawn criticism. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https:/…
 
Student reporters in Los Angeles recently found themselves in a difficult position. They were at odds with the administration at their magnet school, which specializes in journalism, over a report in the student-run newspaper. Autry Rozendal of our PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs has the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org…
 
Episode No. 578 features curators Diana Tuite and Allegra Pesenti. Tuite is the curator of "Bob Thompson: This House Is Mine," a retrospective of Thompson's brief but hugely productive career. It is at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles through January 8, 2023. The Hammer's presentation was coordinated by Erin Christovale with Vanessa Arizmendi. An o…
 
This week: In his cover piece Douglas Murray writes that museums are turning against their own collections. He is joined by the historian Robert Tombs to discuss whether a culture of self-flagellation is harming British museums (00:56). Also this week: For the magazine The Spectator’s assistant editor Cindy Yu writes that the tune is changing in Ch…
 
Nick Doyle is an artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He holds an MFA in sculpture from Hunter College and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Doyle attended the Skowhegan school of painting and sculpture in 2014. From 2014­–2017 Doyle was a resident of the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s workspace program. Solo exhibitions …
 
In our news wrap Wednesday, House Democrats elected New York Representative Hakeem Jeffries as their new leader making him the first Black lawmaker to head a major political party in Congress, the Islamic State group says its latest leader has died in a battle and President Biden pledged $135 million to relocate Native American villages affected by…
 
Congress moved swiftly to head off a nationwide railroad strike. The U.S. House of Representatives voted to impose a compromise settlement on freight railroads and a dozen labor unions and approved more paid sick leave for rail workers. The measures now head to the Senate. Lisa Desjardins reports on some of the key issues in the dispute. PBS NewsHo…
 
COVID's prevalence in the U.S. is much lower than it was during the past two winters, but it is hardly behind us. The U.S. is on pace to lose more than 150,000 Americans during this third year of the pandemic. The Biden administration is concerned and is trying to encourage the use of the booster. White House COVID Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish J…
 
The Federal Reserve has raised interest rates six times this year and Fed Chair Jay Powell suggested that a seventh hike, albeit a smaller one, is on the way next month. But some Democrats and economists worry the Fed hit the brakes too hard. Rakeen Mabud, Chief Economist and Managing Director of Policy and Research at The Groundwork Collaborative,…
 
LGBTQ people are incarcerated at a rate three times higher than the general population. But when they are released from prison, experts say many reentry programs fail to meet their unique needs. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports for our series, Searching for Justice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Imagine living in a world where music is not only heard but also seen. Where words have flavors, and colors have a smell. That is a reality for some people with the rare neurological condition synesthesia, and some artists are using it to expand their creative limits. Michelle San Miguel of Rhode Island PBS reports for our arts and culture series, …
 
Imagine living in a world where music is not only heard but also seen. Where words have flavors, and colors have a smell. That is a reality for some people with the rare neurological condition synesthesia, and some artists are using it to expand their creative limits. Michelle San Miguel of Rhode Island PBS reports for our arts and culture series, …
 
My guest on this week's Book Club podcast is Rupert Shortt, whose stimulating new book The Hardest Problem addresses one of the oldest difficulties in theology: "the problem of evil". Is this something the religious and the secular can even talk meaningfully about? What's the great challenge Dostoevsky throws up? And what did Augustine get right th…
 
See pictures and read more on materiallyspeaking.com In this, the second of our Venice series, Mike Axinn and I met Austrian born shoemaker Gabriele Gmeiner who makes high quality made-to-measure shoes in her workshop at Campiello del Sol. She speaks of her craft, her journey from Austria and why she chose Venice. As we turned into Gabriele’s court…
 
Giulio Romano's "Room of the Giants" in the Palazzo Te is one of the most dramatic and unique pictorial cycles in history. Depicting the fall of the Titans to the Olympian gods, the colossal-scale figures, rounded corners, and illusionistic architecture create a veritable sense of virtual reality. It is a painting cycle with no beginning or end, wh…
 
It’s fair to say that the tobacco industry is one of the most controversial ones out there, with the phrase ‘Big Tobacco’ almost a meme, a shorthand for unscrupulous business practices. No wonder then that tobacco companies are trying to remake themselves, companies like Philip Morris International. PMI has a history dating back to the 1840s, and y…
 
Back from the Thanksgiving holiday, the Democratic-controlled Congress is up against a ticking clock. There are now just five weeks until Republicans take over the majority in the House of Representatives. There's a long list of priorities lawmakers are trying to pass before the end of the year. Congressional Correspondent Lisa Desjardins reports. …
 
A federal jury convicted the founder of the Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, of seditious conspiracy in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Mary McCord, director of the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection, monitored the trial in Washington and joined Judy Woodruff to discuss the verdict. PBS NewsHour is supported by - ht…
 
In our news wrap Tuesday, universities in Beijing and other Chinese cities sent students home after weekend protests against COVID restrictions and the country's leaders, a new Pentagon report estimates China is rapidly building its nuclear arsenal and closing the gap with the U.S. and the city of Houston, Texas lifted a boil-water notice for more …
 
The Supreme Court is weighing border security and the extent to which states can challenge federal policy. Texas and Louisiana are contesting the Biden administration's guidelines on who should be prioritized for deportation. Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal and Theresa Cardinal Brown of the Bipartisan Policy Center joined John Yang to disc…
 
Arizona has been a hotbed for election denialism since 2020, and misinformation is now disrupting what is typically a routine election procedure. One of the state's 15 counties failed to meet Monday's deadline to certify this year's midterm election results and Kari Lake, who lost the election for governor, filed a lawsuit against Maricopa County. …
 
The mpox virus spread globally earlier this year, bringing fears of another pandemic. Many western countries fought off the outbreak with treatments and vaccines. But in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the virus remains endemic, as it has for decades. Special correspondent Benedict Moran and video journalist Jorgen Samso report. PBS NewsHour …
 
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