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Learn Turkish with Free Podcasts Whether you are student or a seasoned speaker, our lessons offer something for everyone. We incorporate culture and current issues into each episode to give the most informative, both linguistically and culturally, podcasts possible. For those of you with just the plane ride to prepare, check our survival phrase series at TurkishClass101.com. One of these phrases just might turn your trip into the best one ever!
 
This is a program for intermediate Turkish learners to practice listening skills. I talk about language learning tips, interesting things about Turkish culture etc. I use a simple language for students to understand what I say , and I speak slowly. This Podcast is fully in Turkish. You can check transcripts and translations of the episodes by visiting my website. my instagram: learnturkishwithturkishcoffee my wesite for transcripts:http://learnturkishwithturkishcoffee.com/en/my-podcast-trans ...
 
Learn Turkish with Free Podcasts Whether you are student or a seasoned speaker, our lessons offer something for everyone. We incorporate culture and current issues into each episode to give the most informative, both linguistically and culturally, podcasts possible. For those of you with just the plane ride to prepare, check our survival phrase series at TurkishClass101.com. One of these phrases just might turn your trip into the best one ever!
 
This podcast is all about the Turkish language and its culture. It's basically for those who really like to explore new things and those who like to learn different languages. This podcast has no age limit. New episodes will come out every Thursday. Instagram Id link: https://www.instagram.com/learnturkishwithng/ Email Id: nanditagulati14@gmail.com
 
You don’t need a PhD in linguistics to explore interesting, unique features of different languages. In this podcast, “Language Matters” by Diplomatic Language Services, we make language accessible to everyday people by discussing features which may not exist in other languages. For instance, unless you have studied a Slavic language, you may not be familiar with “verbs of motion”, but we can teach you! Join us each episode as we host experts to discuss how these unique features impact learni ...
 
Welcome to the Chenelle’s language learning journey podcast. Where host Chenelle patrice Hancock talks about the different tips and tricks of learning a language the visually impaired way. While also interviewing some of the most successful language learners, polyglots and experts within the field of language learning and language acquisition.. Cover art photo by https://www.rawpixel.com< Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chenelle-patrice-hancock/support
 
The Arab Spring: A History is a podcast seeking to explore just how the Arab Spring happened. If you've ever wondered just what has been happening in the Middle East for the last few years, this is the podcast for you. So, how are we going to do this? We're going to tell the story of the Middle East since 1900, and take it up to the present day. We'll look at a mixture of revolutions, social reform, political developments, global diplomacy and economic boom and bust across the region that at ...
 
The Protect Kids Online (PKO) Podcast is brought to you by the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force. This podcast is designed for parents, grandparents, guardians, or caregivers of children. Get information about the trends and updates on the latest apps, websites, and online activity of children 17 yrs and younger. Topics include: activities of the Wisconsin ICAC Task Force; App of the Week; tips & methods for combating online child exploitatio ...
 
The "Lapses" project, developed for the Pavilion of Turkey, consists of projects that demonstrate how the perception of "occurring events" can vary and lead to the differing narrations of history because of lapses in collective memory. The project has been realized through works by two artists: Banu Cennetoglu's "CATALOG" and Ahmet Ögüt's "Exploded City". Both projects reveal the possibility for diverse memory formations or diverse narratives, conceivable through lapses.??The project is acco ...
 
Back in the 17th century, the Habsburgs had a small summer palace on this site. However, this was destroyed during the second Turkish siege of Vienna in 1683. After the defeat of the Turks, Emperor Leopold I commissioned the Austrian Baroque architect Fischer von Erlach with the construction of a hunting lodge. Fifty years later Maria Theresa had Schönbrunn remodelled in the Rococo style by her court architect Nicolaus Pacassi. Here she spent the summer months together with the court househo ...
 
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show series
 
The Korean War is now America's seminal war. It was the first war conducted with the new United Nations, the first war fought against the Chinese Communists, and the first modern war the US didn't win. Louis Nelson designed the mural wall at the Korean Veterans Memorial on the Mall in Washington DC. His just published memoir, Mosaic: War Monument M…
 
In The Healing Otherness Handbook: Overcome the Trauma of Identity-Based Bullying and Find Power in Your Difference (New Harbinger, 2021), Stacee Reicherzer—a nationally known transgender psychotherapist and expert on trauma, otherness, and self-sabotage—shares her own personal story of childhood bullying, and how it inspired her to help others hea…
 
Before Winston Churchill made history, he made news. To a great extent, the news made him too. If it was his own efforts that made him a hero, it was the media that made him a celebrity - and it has been considerably responsible for perpetuating his memory and shaping his reputation in the years since his death. Discussing this topic and much more …
 
Today I interview Dinty W. Moore and Zoë Bossiere, the editors of the new anthology The Best of Brevity: Twenty Groundbreaking Years of Flash Nonfiction (Rose Metal Press, 2020). The anthology brings together the best of Brevity Magazine, which publishes works of literary nonfiction that are less than 750 words. So how do you write about, say, the …
 
Doron Taussig invites us to question the American Dream. Did you earn what you have? Did everyone else? The American Dream is built on the idea that Americans end up, in our working lives, roughly where we deserve to be based on our efforts and abilities—in other words, the United States is supposed to be a meritocracy. When Americans think and tal…
 
In Impossible Stories: On the Space and Time of Black Destructive Creation (Ohio State UP, 2021), John Murillo offers bold new readings of recent and canonical Black creative works within an Afro-pessimistic framework to excavate how time, space, and blackness intersect—or, rather, crash. Building on Michelle Wright’s ideas about dislocation from t…
 
The Business of Architecture: Your Guide to a Financially Successful Firm (Routledge, 2017) is the essential guide to understanding the critical fundamentals to succeed as an architect. Written by successful architects for architects everywhere, this book shows the architecture industry from a corporate business perspective, refining the approach t…
 
There has been a resurgent global interest in the origins and formation of authoritarian regimes as many states around the world drift away from liberal democracy. Indonesia’s experiences with such an authoritarian turn in the 1950s and 1960s offers many lessons from history. In Authoritarian Modernization in Indonesia’s Early Independence Period (…
 
Simon Critchley's Tragedy, the Greeks, and Us (Vintage, 2020) does not offer a comprehensive theory of tragedy. Instead, it takes issue with the bland simplifications that philosophers have offered in place of a robust engagement with tragedies, plural. Critchley examines Nietzche's wishful speculation on the origin of tragedy, Aristotle's dry and …
 
Genocide is not only a problem of mass death, but also of how, as a relatively new idea and law, it organizes and distorts thinking about civilian destruction. Taking the normative perspective of civilian immunity from military attack, A. Dirk Moses argues that the implicit hierarchy of international criminal law, atop which sits genocide as the 'c…
 
In today’s episode, we speak with Ayesha Chaudhry about her new book, The Colour of God (Oneworld Publications, 2021). The book describes Chaudhry’s personal, spiritual, and professional journey as she navigates her life as a South Asian immigrant Muslim girl raised in Canada. Rich in its analysis of its major themes – such as patriarchy, religion,…
 
The Portrait is a story full of ambiguity and suspense, one that works on many different levels and holds the reader’s attention until the very last page. Recently published to great acclaim, the book will soon become a Sky TV mini-series. In what she called a 'beautiful' conversation with Duncan McCargo, Ilaria Bernadini explains, inter alia: why …
 
Cristina Beltrán has written a thoughtful and interrogating analysis of the concept of citizenship, particularly in the United States, and how the history of the United States as a country has shaped an understanding of who gets to be “belong” as a member of this society. The book, Cruelty as Citizenship: How Migrant Suffering Sustains White Democr…
 
Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at dr.danamalone@gmail.com or cgessler@…
 
Australia has always been multilingual. Yet English language sources have dominated political and popular discourses over the last few centuries, overshadowing the significant contribution made by other languages and cultures in shaping Australian history and identity. Professor Adrian Vickers spoke to Dr Natali Pearson about his work as part of an…
 
In her new book From Rabbit Ears to the Rabbit Hole: A Life with Television (University of Mississippi Press, 2021) TV scholar and fan Kathleen Collins reflects on how her life as a consumer of television has intersected with the cultural and technological evolution of the medium itself. In a narrative bridging television studies, memoir, and comic…
 
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