show episodes
 
Each week, a guest makes a series of recommendations of things which they think should be better known. Our recommendations include interesting people, places, objects, stories, experiences and ideas which our guest feels haven't had the exposure that they deserve.
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show series
 
During Prohibition, the cocktails are downright criminal. This episode was hosted by Leandra Griffith with guest (and usual host) Caroline Crampton. If you are interested in seeing more content from Leandra, you can find her on YouTube and Instagram. Caroline's new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more …
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During Prohibition, the cocktails are downright criminal. This episode was hosted by Leandra Griffith with guest (and usual host) Caroline Crampton. If you are interested in seeing more content from Leandra, you can find her on YouTube and Instagram. My new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get …
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Katherine Bucknell discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Katherine Bucknell edited all four volumes of Christopher Isherwood's Diaries , a volume of letters between Christopher Isherwood and his partner Don Bachardy (The Animals), and W.H. Auden's Juvenilia: Poems 1922-1928. Co-editor of Auden Studies, a founder of The W. H. …
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This is the Shedunnit Book Club companion episode for July 2024, in which we are reading The Wheel Spins by Ethel Lina White. There are no major spoilers in this primer, but if you'd rather read the book with no knowledge of its plot or structure at all, I'd recommend listening only once you've finished reading. I’ll see you in the Shedunnit forum …
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Tom Newton Dunn is a presenter, political commentator and writer. He first made his name as an award-winning defence correspondent covering the Iraq and Afghan wars. He went on to be Political Editor of The Sun for 11 years, leading coverage of four general election campaigns and the Brexit referendum, and interviewed seven British Prime Ministers …
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CriminOlly joins Caroline to read this classic of American hardboiled crime fiction. No major plot spoilers until you hear Caroline say we are "entering the spoiler zone", at 26:30. After that, expect full spoilers. A full list of titles in the Penguin series can be found at penguinfirsteditions.com. Olly's YouTube channel can be found at youtube.c…
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Today, we're joined by Will Clark, host and creator of Grey History: The French Revolution. He and Gavin discuss their favorite works of art from the French Revolution. Show notes available at www.artofcrimepodcast.com. If you'd like to support the show and gain access to exclusive bonus episodes, please consider becoming a patron at www.patreon.co…
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CriminOlly joins Caroline to read this classic of American hardboiled crime fiction. Olly's YouTube channel can be found at youtube.com/@CriminOllyBlog. Caroline's new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get your copy, visit her website carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglass. No major plot spoilers…
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Alex Edmans discusses with Ivan six things which should be less well known. Alex’s new book is May Contain Lies, about misinformation, and so, in a reversal of the usual format, he discusses six ideas and beliefs which have been overexposed. Alex Edmans is Professor of Finance at London Business School. Alex has a PhD from MIT as a Fulbright Schola…
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There’s something sinister in the stacks. Thanks to my guest Harriet Evans, aka Harriet F. Townson, who is the author of D is for Death. My new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get your copy, visit my website carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglass. Join the Shedunnit Book Club for two extra Shed…
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In this bonus episode, Caroline continues her conversation with Harriet Evans from the Murder in the Library episode (don't worry, no repeat content here, just new stuff!). Topics include: Harriet's journey from writing commercial fiction to writing crime fiction, Harriet's obsession with butterflies, and our dream casting for a new Gaudy Night TV …
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There’s something sinister in the stacks. Thanks to my guest Harriet Evans, aka Harriet F. Townson, who is the author of D is for Death. My new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get your copy, visit my website carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglass. Mentioned in this episode: — The Body in the Li…
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Jonn Elledge is a New Statesman columnist, and a contributor to the Big Issue, the Guardian, the Evening Standard, and a number of other newspapers. He was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman, where he created and ran its urbanism-focused CityMetric site, and spent six happy years writing about cities, maps and borders and hosting t…
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In 1823, John Thurtell murdered the gambler William Weare while the two were riding in a horse-drawn gig. Cashing in on public fascination with the case, the Surrey Theatre staged The Gamblers, a play that recreated the murder and incorporated the actual horse-drawn gig in which the crime took place. The Gamblers became one of the most explosive me…
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Henry Oliver discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Henry Oliver is a writer, speaker, and brand consultant. He writes regularly for outlets like the New Statesman, The Critic, and UnHerd. He writes the popular Substack The Common Reader, which was recently mentioned in the Atlantic. His book Second Act is about late bloomers.…
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This is the Shedunnit Book Club companion episode for June 2024, in which we are reading Tokyo Express by Seichō Matsumoto. There are no major spoilers in this primer, but if you'd rather read the book with no knowledge of its plot or structure at all, I'd recommend listening only once you've finished reading. I’ll see you in the Shedunnit forum fo…
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Jamaica Kincaid discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Jamaica Kincaid was born in St. John’s, Antigua. Her books include At the Borrom of the River; Annie John; Lucy; The Autobiography of My Mother; My Brother; Mr Potter; and See Now Then. She teaches at Harvard University and lives in Vermont. Her new book is an Encylopedia …
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The great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas had a passion for detective stories. This episode is hosted by Guy Cuthbertson. His guest is John Goodby, a Professor of Arts and Culture at Sheffield Hallam University, and an expert on Dylan Thomas. He edited The Collected Poems of Dylan Thomas and has co-authored a biography of Thomas. He is also a poet, transla…
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A surprising number of crime stories from the Golden Age of Detective Fiction take place in wax museums. Today, we're joined by Caroline Crampton, host and creator of Shedunnit, a podcast that unravels the mysteries behind classic detective stories, to talk about why the wax museum has fueled the imagination of so many crime writers. Link to "Waxwo…
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The great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas had a passion for detective stories. John Goodby is Professor of Arts and Culture at Sheffield Hallam University, and an expert on Dylan Thomas. He edited The Collected Poems of Dylan Thomas and has co-authored a biography of Thomas. He is also a poet, translator and arts organiser. You can hear more of Guy and Joh…
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In this bonus episode, Guy and John Goodby continue their conversation from the Dylan's Whodunnits episode, covering the other poets of the 1930s and their connections to detective fiction — in particular W.H. Auden and Cecil Day Lewis (aka Nicholas Blake). Listen using the player above or in your own app via your private podcast feed (setup instru…
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Caroline Eden returns to discuss with Ivan six things which should be better known. Caroline Eden is a writer and book critic contributing to the Financial Times, Guardian andthe Times Literary Supplement. Her new book is Cold Kitchen: A Year of Culinary Journeys. Her earlier books include Samarkand, Black Sea and Red Sands, winner of the prestigio…
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This is the Shedunnit Book Club companion episode for May 2024, in which we are reading Black Plumes by Margery Allingham. There are no major spoilers in this primer, but if you'd rather read the book with no knowledge of its plot or structure at all, I'd recommend listening only once you've finished reading. I’ll see you in the Shedunnit forum for…
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Why didn’t the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh write more detective fiction? My new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get your copy, visit my website carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglass. Join the Shedunnit Book Club for two extra Shedunnit episodes a month plus access to the monthly reading discuss…
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Why didn’t the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh write more detective fiction? My new book, A Body Made of Glass: A History of Hypochondria, is out now. To find out more and get your copy, visit my website carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglass. Mentioned in this episode: — When We Were Very Young by AA Milne — Winnie-the-Pooh by AA Milne — The House At Po…
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Caroline Crampton discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Caroline Crampton is the author of The Way to the Sea: The Forgotten Histories of the Thames Estuary (Granta, 2019). Her award-winning podcast, Shedunnit, is distributed by BBC Sounds. Her journalism has appeared in the New Statesman, The Times and the Guardian. An exper…
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Beaumarchais’s madcap comedy, The Marriage of Figaro, smashed box-office records when it opened in Paris in 1784. The following year, a team of real-life con artists drew inspiration from a crucial scene in the play as they planned—and pulled off—the swindle of the century. Show notes and full transcripts available at www.artofcrimepodcast.com. If …
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Kathryn Hughes discusses with Ivan six things which should be better known. Kathryn Hughes is the critically acclaimed author of The Victorian Governess, The Short Life and Long Times of Mrs Beeton, which was longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, and the hugely acclaimed George Eliot: The Last Victorian, which won the James Tait Black Memorial P…
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Caroline Crampton is joined by writer Moira Redmond to talk about the Chalet School books by Elinor M. Brent-Dyer. This is a crossover episode from another podcast series Caroline is making at the moment, A Body Made of Glass. If you head to carolinecrampton.com/abodymadeofglasspodcast, you listen to more conversations that explore the intersection…
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