show episodes
 
Ever wonder why you can practice for hours, sound great in the practice room, and still be frustratingly hit or miss on stage? Join performance psychologist and Juilliard alumnus/faculty Noa Kageyama, and explore research-based “practice hacks” for beating anxiety, practicing more effectively, and playing up to your full abilities when it matters most.
 
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show series
 
In this 2013 interview pulled from the archives, Juilliard viola faculty member Toby Appel shares insights on practicing, teaching, and some of the things he's been grateful for over the course of his career. NOTE: This was recorded way back before I had the sort of gear that's necessary for this sort of thing, so the audio quality isn't great, and…
 
Learning how to manage our emotional health and recharge our batteries is an important part of cultivating mental toughness and resilience. "Awe walks" could be a simple, quick, research-based strategy to try that might be a useful strategy to add to your toolbox. Stressed, Anxious, and Feeling a Little Burned Out? Here’s How an “Awe Walk” Could He…
 
Bob Fisher has set 25 Guinness world records in free throw shooting - all after the age of 50. How did he become so good at shooting free throws? He once said that "anyone could do what I do if they knew what I know." And in this episode, he shares some of the key learning principles that he believes helped him achieve this enviable level of skill.…
 
2020 has been an unusually stressful year for most. So when it comes to maximizing well-being, and being in as good a place mentally, physically, and emotionally, as we can be, is it more important that we set goals and stick to the path? Or that we take the time to relax and look for positive moments during each day (even if they're tiny and trivi…
 
Ever find yourself playing more cautiously and tentatively under pressure, and wondering how to loosen up, trust yourself, and play more freely like your teacher keeps encouraging you to do? It seems that self-efficacy is an important ingredient in risk-taking, and in today's episode, I'll describe a simple exercise that can help with building some…
 
If you had a choice between starting with your most challenging tasks and progressing towards the easier ones or starting with your easiest tasks and progressing towards the most challenging ones, what would you choose? And which one do you think would lead to greater confidence and self-efficacy? A recent study suggests that if your goal is to bui…
 
Conventional wisdom suggests that when we're learning a difficult passage, we should start slow, and gradually work it up to tempo with a metronome. But what if I told you that there's a more efficient and effective way to get a difficult passage up to tempo? And that this slow-to-fast process can actually lead to bad habits that we later have to w…
 
We've all been told that having phones nearby while studying or practicing can be a distraction and degrade the quality of our practicing/studying. But what about engaging in social media before we practice? Does what we do in the 30 minutes or so before practicing also matter? And if so, why?
 
We've all heard stories about famous musicians who had a drink (or two) before performing to calm their nerves. But does this really make things better - or does it actually make things worse? A recent study provides some clues. What Does the Research Say About Having a Couple Drinks Before Performing?…
 
It's been said that being in a quartet is like being in a marriage. And like any relationship, there's bound to be conflict from time to time. Research suggests that how we respond to these conflicts may have a significant impact on our relationship satisfaction, not to mention our mood afterwards. So might there be a few things we can apply from t…
 
Logic would suggest that when choosing a teacher or mentor, we would select people based more on their expertise and advising experience than anything else. But is this what we actually do? A recent study suggests that we may actually be more influenced by flattery and positive comments about our abilities than we'd like to think... Is This Really …
 
Almost every musician has either had a memory slip or worried about having one at some point in their lives. So how important is it really to play from memory? Is it just one of those things we do for show, or is there real value in memorizing? Pianist Stephen Hough weighs in on this question, and as you can imagine, the answer is rather complex an…
 
I think we all assume that negative self-talk is bad, but the research is actually somewhat mixed. As in, there are some studies in which negative self-talk is associated with the same or better performance. How could that be? Well, a recent study suggests that the answer may lie in how we respond to this inner critic. And there might be a simple t…
 
Have you ever tried to experiment with random (aka interleaved) practice, but quit, because you weren't sure if you were doing it right? Or worried that you were letting bad habits stay in your hands, because you were moving on to other things too quickly? Clarinetist Christine Carter is back to answer many of the most common questions people encou…
 
Ever send an email to someone, and get a little bummed out (or annoyed) when you never hear back? Research suggests that the way we close our emails can have more of an impact than we realize - and in some pretty surprising and unexpected ways that go beyond whether we get a response or not. An Email Hack That Could Increase the Likelihood of Getti…
 
Like many other musicians, perhaps you've recorded your weekly lessons in the past. Or had a parent who recorded them. But given how much time it takes to listen back, how useful is this really? Met timpanist Jason Haaheim explains why he believes recording and transcribing your lessons is essential, and why this can significantly increase the effe…
 
Ever wonder why some people seem to always be coming up with effective and creative ways to overcome challenges, and some folks get stuck kind of going in circles even though they're putting in a ton of effort and energy? Research suggests that there may be a particular "strategic mindset" (and a few questions) that lends itself to thinking about p…
 
Ever find yourself struggling with motivation and difficulty following through? Whether it's practicing or exercising, research suggests that asking a friend or acquaintance for advice could lead to more success than simply trying to think up strategies to try on our own, without it coming from a friend. Having Difficulty Motivating Yourself to Pra…
 
If you've been trying to convince yourself (or your students) to do more self-recording, here's a study that illustrates why this is such a useful practice tool. And also suggests that we might not be quite as good at simultaneously performing and critiquing as we'd like to think. Evidence That You're Probably Not Great at Performing and Critiquing…
 
Violinist and educator Christian Howes drops by to chat about learning how to improvise, how to overcome overwhelm, connect and collaborate more effectively with a diverse range of other musicians, and hopefully become a better friend to ourselves through it all. Christian Howes: On Overcoming Improvisation Anxiety, Making Technical Practice More C…
 
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