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Best War Studies podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best War Studies podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Overwatch, an Institute for the Study of War podcast, goes beyond the news headlines to give listeners analysis and commentary on issues related to U.S. national security and American foreign policy. The episodes feature discussions with experts and practitioners to explore what challenges and opportunities lie ahead for the U.S.
 
The School of Security Studies harnesses the depth and breadth of expertise across War Studies and Defence Studies to produce world-leading research and teaching on issues of global security that develops new empirical knowledge, employs innovative theory, and addresses vital policy issues. The podcasts highlight the School's research and teaching activities as well as cover events the department organises for its students and the public. DISCLAIMER: Any information, statements or opinions c ...
 
Cold Call distills Harvard Business School's legendary case studies into podcast form. Hosted by Brian Kenny, the podcast airs every two weeks and features Harvard Business School faculty discussing cases they've written and the lessons they impart.
 
Our mission is to create a platform for all serious students to easily study the entire Tanach (Torah, Nevi’im and Ketuvim) in a comprehensible fashion. We seek to generate an experience that allows our members to become intimately familiar with the text, framework, and storyline of the Tanach. Our emergent objectives are to increase knowledge of our ancestral Jewish history, to strengthen our sense of awe and love of God, and reinforce our personal and national Jewish identity.
 
Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. ...
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
CNN's chief Washington correspondent, Jake Tapper, hosts this hourlong weekday afternoon program, which mixes Tapper's interests with headlines from around the country and the world, headlines that span politics, money, sports and popular culture. "The Lead" also concentrates on bringing stories that aren't found on front pages -- buried leads -- to the forefront.
 
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In a time of contentious debate over Confederate monuments, Nicole Maurantonio (Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Communication studies and American Studies at the University of Richmond) provides an intriguing look into how revisionist ideas of the Confederacy have seeped into mainstream culture. Based in Richmond, the former capital of the Conf…
 
What brought about an end to the Cold War has long been a subject of speculation and mythology. One prominent argument is that the United States simply bankrupted the Soviet Union, outspending the Soviets on the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, or "Star Wars"). Renowned Soviet and Russian scholar, Professor Archie Brown in his latest work rejects…
 
In this episode, Jana Byars talks to Josh Cerretti, Associate Professor of History and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Western Washington University about his new book, Abuses of the Erotic: Militarizing Sexuality in the Post-Cold War United States (University of Nebraska Press, 2020). In Cerretti’s own words, “In Abuses of the Erotic, I ar…
 
This fascinating book by Richard Carswell looks at how the fall of France in the Second World War has been recorded by historians and remembered within French society. The Fall of France in the Second World War: History and Memory (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) argues that explanations of the 'debacle' have usually revolved around the four main themes …
 
Many people outside China, and indeed many urbanites living in the country, rarely think about its vast rural areas. Yet today’s People’s Republic in many ways owes existence to the countryside where, seven and more decades ago, a rural revolution brought the new state into people’s lives, and new people under the state’s stewardship. Brian DeMare’…
 
Fourth of July celebrations in many parts of the United States were muted this year, overshadowed by a virus spreading with alarming speed. The national death toll from COVID-19 has surpassed 130,000, and hospitals in the South and West particularly are struggling to keep up with the demand for urgent care. Still, some Americans oppose shutdowns an…
 
In our news wrap Monday, a federal judge has ordered the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline pending an environmental review. The decision represents a major victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. Also, Chicago suffered one of its bloodiest holiday weekends, with 17 people shot and killed -- including a 7-year-old girl and a 14-year-old boy.…
 
For months, it's been clear that the pandemic is taking a disproportionate toll on people of color. Now, new data quantifies the disparities, showing that African American and Latinx people are nearly three times as likely to contract COVID-19 as white Americans and twice as likely to die from it. Amna Nawaz talks to Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo of …
 
32 states increase in cases, 14 states steady, only 4 declining; At least ten states seeing record level of hospitalizations; Americans pack beaches, parties as infections surge in U.S.; Cuomo: New York shouldn’t get “cocky” & invite curve to go up; Austin mayor: 2 weeks away from hospital beds running out; Hospitalizations in Miami-Dade county up …
 
With the U.S. economy in shambles due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, Latina workers have suffered the worst job losses, with 19 percent reporting being unemployed in May. Latinx Americans are also among the groups most likely to contract COVID-19 -- and to die from it. We spoke to several Latina women, including two undocumented immigrants, abo…
 
Weather forecasters say the current tropical storm season is likely to be more active than normal, with as many as six major hurricanes. But planning for these disasters is more complex this year. The coronavirus pandemic has made it harder to stock up on emergency supplies and will almost certainly complicate evacuation efforts. John Yang reports.…
 
Recent headlines out of Hong Kong have focused on politics, with the imposition of a controversial new national security law from Beijing. But on the public health front, Hong Kong has been a coronavirus success story, suffering much less infection and death than was expected considering the semi-autonomous city's high population density and proxim…
 
NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump's inflammatory rhetoric on race and American history, what polls say about how effective he is on these issues and why he's not talking more about the coronavirus pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - …
 
In Britain, pubs reopened over July 4th weekend after nearly three months of coronavirus lockdowns. Patrons expressed their desire to get out and socialize after the long period of isolation, and business owners took special precautions to prepare. But many revelers ignored appeals for social distancing, and police had to disperse drunken crowds. S…
 
Mike Smith co-founded the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt in 1987. Now living through his second pandemic, Smith is finding ways to help out amid COVID-19 -- and to inspire others to do the same. He shares his Brief But Spectacular take on turning grief into action. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
I was joinded by Dr Charlotte Riley, a feminist historian of 20th century Britain. Whilst lecturing on the Labour Party, decolonization, and overseas aid and development programmes, Charlotte has been an important voice in the debate surrounding the role of public statues. How do statues enhance or subvert our understanding of the past? Can we ever…
 
In her nuanced case study of postemanciaption Virginia, Nicole Myers Turner, (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University) challenges assumptions regarding the intersection between black religion and politics in this “signal moment of political and cultural transformation in the African-American experience.” Using traditional archiv…
 
Historians of Latin America have long appreciated the central role of mining and metallurgy in the region. The Spanish Empire in particular was created for and founded upon the mining and coining of silver ore from its colonies. Our knowledge about this vital industry, however, remains invariably tethered to the elite sources and perspectives that …
 
Television informs our perceptions and expectations of leaders and offers a guide to understanding how we, as organizational actors, should communicate, act, and relate. Join NBN host Lee Pierce (s/t) and editor/contributor Dr. Creshema Murray as they discuss Leadership Through the Lens: Interrogating Production, Presentation, and Power (Rowman and…
 
In her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Hope M. Harrison examines the history and meaning of the Berlin Wall, Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, this book profiles key memory activists who have fought to commemorate the h…
 
The "guard is tired." With that simple phrase, the newly installed Bolshevik regime in Russia dismissed the duly elected Constituent Assembly in January 1918. And, one might say, so started Russia's century-long interference in elections and electoral outcomes. In his new book Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Inter…
 
In her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Hope M. Harrison examines the history and meaning of the Berlin Wall, Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, this book profiles key memory activists who have fought to commemorate the h…
 
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice—a case that altered the fates of all ex-Nazis. Before World Wa…
 
The "guard is tired." With that simple phrase, the newly installed Bolshevik regime in Russia dismissed the duly elected Constituent Assembly in January 1918. And, one might say, so started Russia's century-long interference in elections and electoral outcomes. In his new book Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Inter…
 
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice—a case that altered the fates of all ex-Nazis. Before World Wa…
 
In her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Hope M. Harrison examines the history and meaning of the Berlin Wall, Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, this book profiles key memory activists who have fought to commemorate the h…
 
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the notorious Butcher of Latvia to justice—a case that altered the fates of all ex-Nazis. Before World Wa…
 
Historians of Latin America have long appreciated the central role of mining and metallurgy in the region. The Spanish Empire in particular was created for and founded upon the mining and coining of silver ore from its colonies. Our knowledge about this vital industry, however, remains invariably tethered to the elite sources and perspectives that …
 
As businesses reopen and cases across several states in the U.S. and across the world surge, experts worry that "superspreaders," a small percentage of infected people are transmitting the virus to a much larger percent, could be fueling the pandemic. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Ben Lopman, an epidemiology professor at Emory University's Rollins S…
 
Suspected cases of drug overdoses soared between March and May, according to data from medical teams,hospitals and the police. According to a Washington Post report, the isolation and economic upheaval caused by the pandemic are fueling this hidden epidemic. Heather Long who co-wrote that story joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss. PBS NewsHour is sup…
 
President Trump's campaign will focus on claiming Trump is all that stands between America and the 'un-American left wing forces' trying to destroy the country's cultural heritage, and paint Joe Biden as too weak to stop it, according to Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield, who spoke with Hari Sreenivasan about the 2020 election. PBS NewsHour is …
 
Alex Larman has struck gold. He discovered one of the rarest and most precious things in the history world: an unknown source which shines a bright new light on its subject. He uncovered brand new documents relating to an assassination attempt on Edward VIII in July 1936, by George McMahon. Alex took me through the documents he found and the story …
 
In a fiery speech, President Trump railed against "angry mobs" that were trying to "tear down statues" at a rally at Mt. Rushmore on Friday. Despite warnings, there were few facemasks and little social distancing at the event, which saw protests by Native Americans on roads leading up to the site. Chase Iron Eyes, Special Adviser to the Oglala Siou…
 
Advocates in Chicago are calling a plan by the city's police to deploy 1200 additional officers over the July Fourth holiday weekend to arrest teenagers found on so-called "drug corners" unconstitutional, saying it contradicts police reform measures. Sheila Bedi, an attorney representing a coalition of community organizers and a Clinical professor …
 
The Divan Orchestra founded by an Israeli and a Palestinian as a humanist project for friendship and dialogue is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. Today, its young members are both Israeli and Arab. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent David Tereshchuk reports on the collaboration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/news…
 
The global health crisis caused by COVID-19 has affected nearly every aspect of American society and government. The pandemic has forced changes to individual lifestyles as well as the highest levels of policymaking. In this episode of Overwatch, ISW National Security Fellow Jennifer Cafarella discusses the challenges, threats, and opportunities th…
 
Guessing is a weird thing. For millennia, it could have meant the difference between life and death. Now it's not as vital, but we still do it every day, whether behind the wheel of a car, or judging what another person might be feeling. In this classic episode, learn everything we know about the brain and how it manages this odd, very human act. L…
 
In our news wrap Friday, a trial is underway in Istanbul for 20 Saudis charged in the October 2018 slaying of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. None of the accused were in court, as Saudi Arabia rejected demands for their extradition. Also, Ethiopia's prime minister called out protesters for refusing to end a week of violent unrest followi…
 
As the Fourth of July approaches, coronavirus cases are rising across the country, with businesses and public spaces again closing down as a result. Where does the U.S. stand in terms of managing this public health crisis? Judy Woodruff talks to top elected officials of two major metropolitan areas: Judge Lina Hidalgo of Harris County, Texas, and M…
 
The reverberations from China's new national security law, which restricts freedom of speech in Hong Kong, continue. Nathan Law is a prominent pro-democracy activist who fled Hong Kong after the crackdown. He joins Nick Schifrin to discuss what protesters on the ground need from the international community, whether he has hope for Hong Kong's futur…
 
Facebook is under increasing pressure to regulate and remove extremist and hateful content from its platform. Several major corporations have pledged to stop buying ads on the social media site during July unless the company acts. With advertising comprising 98 percent of Facebook's revenue, its share value has already dropped. But will the boycott…
 
A decades-old controversy over the name of the Washington, D.C., football team has reached a tipping point. After years of public outcry condemning the name as a racial slur aimed at Native Americans, the organization is finally considering a change. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to Washington Post columnist Kevin Blackistone, who is producing a doc…
 
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