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Shrikes

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Manage episode 362702806 series 2801482
Content provided by Ivan Phillipsen. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Ivan Phillipsen or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

This is Episode 75. It’s all about shrikes—birds in the family Laniidae.
These are true songbirds—members of the avian suborder Passeri within the order Passeriformes—even though they act (and sort of look like) tiny falcons or hawks.
Shrikes are sit and wait predators. They typically sit upright on an exposed, conspicuous perch and then wait for something tasty to come along. Some small animal, like a Vesper Sparrow, a rodent, lizard, grasshopper, and so on.
Shrikes are such cool birds that they have many fans among ornithologists. In fact, there’s a subdiscipline of ornithology called shrikeology. For real. And those who study these fascinating birds are known as shrikeologists.
So for today, at least, let’s all be honorary shrikeologists. Let’s get down to the nitty-gritty details of shrike biology.
Errors and Updates

  • I said that Germans call the Great Gray Shrike "Nine Murder." Several of my German listeners emailed and kindly corrected me. The species they call Nine Murder is the Red-backed Shrike.

Links of Interest

~~ Leave me a review using Podchaser ~~

Link to this episode on the Science of Birds website
Birds of a Feather Talk Together
A podcast all about birds. Two bird experts, John Bates and Shannon Hackett, educate...
Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Support the Show.

  continue reading

96 episodes

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Shrikes

The Science of Birds

191 subscribers

published

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Manage episode 362702806 series 2801482
Content provided by Ivan Phillipsen. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Ivan Phillipsen or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

This is Episode 75. It’s all about shrikes—birds in the family Laniidae.
These are true songbirds—members of the avian suborder Passeri within the order Passeriformes—even though they act (and sort of look like) tiny falcons or hawks.
Shrikes are sit and wait predators. They typically sit upright on an exposed, conspicuous perch and then wait for something tasty to come along. Some small animal, like a Vesper Sparrow, a rodent, lizard, grasshopper, and so on.
Shrikes are such cool birds that they have many fans among ornithologists. In fact, there’s a subdiscipline of ornithology called shrikeology. For real. And those who study these fascinating birds are known as shrikeologists.
So for today, at least, let’s all be honorary shrikeologists. Let’s get down to the nitty-gritty details of shrike biology.
Errors and Updates

  • I said that Germans call the Great Gray Shrike "Nine Murder." Several of my German listeners emailed and kindly corrected me. The species they call Nine Murder is the Red-backed Shrike.

Links of Interest

~~ Leave me a review using Podchaser ~~

Link to this episode on the Science of Birds website
Birds of a Feather Talk Together
A podcast all about birds. Two bird experts, John Bates and Shannon Hackett, educate...
Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Support the Show.

  continue reading

96 episodes

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