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This free monthly podcast is offered by Clinical Chemistry. Clinical Chemistry is the leading forum for peer-reviewed, original research on innovative practices in today's clinical laboratory. In addition to being the most cited journal in the field, Clinical Chemistry has the highest Impact Factor (7.292 in 2019) among journals of clinical chemistry, clinical (or anatomic) pathology, analytical chemistry, and the subspecialties, such as transfusion medicine and clinical microbiology.
 
The audio magazine of WACKER shows the many exciting roles chemistry plays in everyday life. Each instalment will give you interesting insights into how chemistry ensures perfectly functioning products in all areas of life. Whether it is drugs, computers, cleaning agents, clothing or toys - WACKER products play a vital role almost everywhere. More: www.wacker.com/podcast
 
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#099 The ads are everywhere. Trying to convince us to buy something to prevent or undo the wrinkles and skin damage that comes with aging. But can those products really do anything for us? Is it even chemistry? Or is it all just a bunch of hooey? Let's find out. This episode is sponsored by JolieIsabel.com Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help kee…
 
Get your garlic and crucifix ready as we tackle Kathryn Harkup’s latest book Vampirology: The Science of Horror’s Most Famous Fiend. Harkup is a chemist and science communicator, and an expert at casting a scientific eye on cultural phenomena, literature and film. Her debut, A is for Arsenic – about the poisons in Agatha Christie’s works – featured…
 
Last year Distillations talked to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. In this episode we talk to Stéphane Bancel, CEO of Moderna, a biotech company that developed one of the three emergency-approved COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. The Moderna …
 
We were lucky enough to get a chance to participate in 908 devices webinar on aerosols and chat with our dear friend Dr. Mark Norman on the topic. We learned a lot. Thank you to our sponsor: 908 Devices, First Line Technology, Argon Electronics and First Call Environmental Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! O…
 
#098 Could histamine and antihistamines do more than just affect our allergies? Actually yes. Today we discuss new and recent research in the world of histamine, and believe us, there's some really cool stuff. This episode is sponsored by JolieIsabel.com Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
In the 1700s human dissection was a big taboo—people feared that it would leave their bodies mangled on Judgment Day, when God would raise the dead. As a result, government officials banned most dissections. This led to some unintended consequences, most notably a shortage of bodies for anatomists to dissect. To meet the heightened demand, a new pr…
 
Bonus Episode: Chemistry at Home 13 Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we crack Lifesaver mints in the dark. Trust us, it should raise your eyebrows. Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
We were lucky enough to get a chance to participate in 908 devices webinar on aerosols and chat with our dear friend Dr. Mark Norman on the topic. We learned a lot. Thank you to our sponsor: 908 Devices, First Line Technology, Argon Electronics and First Call Environmental Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! O…
 
Credits Host: Sam Kean Senior Producer: Mariel Carr Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez Audio Engineer: Jonathan Pfeffer Music: "Trois Gnossiennes 3," "Stately Shadows," "Darklit Carpet," "Vernouillet," and "Tossed" by Blue Dot Sessions. "Conjunto Sol del Peru," by Pockra (Vol. 2: Musica de los Andes Peruanos). "Conjunto Sol del Peru," by Wuaylias Tusy (…
 
More than 50 years of missions to Mars paint a clear picture of a cold, dry, desert planet. And at the same time, photographs, minerals, and other data tell scientists that Mars once had as much water as Earth, or even more. Why are the two planets so different today? In this episode of Stereo Chemistry, we talk to scientists about the latest resea…
 
Bonus Episode: Question and Response 20 In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about color changing markers, electron energy level analogies, forensics, grass, chocolate, and more! Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. Want to start your own podcast? Use Transistor and you'll …
 
Four great questions from the mailbag. Thank you to our sponsor: 908 Devices, First Line Technology, Argon Electronics and First Call Environmental Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! Our hazardous materials training manual is finally available on Amazon! Click here to get your copy. Don’t forget to rate, revi…
 
How an early 20th century doctor pitted one scourge (malaria) against another (syphilis). Credits Host: Sam Kean Senior Producer: Mariel Carr Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez Audio Engineer: Jonathan Pfeffer Music: “Delamine” by Blue Dot Sessions. ​​​​​​​All other music composed by Jonathan Pfeffer.
 
An often overlooked part of our containment is the size and shape of the containment pool we use. The shorter, wider pools put us at a tactical disadvantage. Here’s why. Thank you to our sponsor: 908 Devices, First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! Our hazardous material…
 
#095 Venus flytraps: The plants that have fascinated and freaked many of us out since we were kids. How do they do what they do? Most plants just kinda sit there and soak up water and sunlight, but not Venus flytraps. How do they sense flies? How do they trap them? How do they eat them? Oh also, is it chemistry? Let's find out. Like the show? Buy u…
 
How do you make a chemical-resistant beaker out of a material as fragile as glass? And how do you tell the temperature of a piece of steel without a thermometer? These are questions Anna Ploszajski tackles in her book Handmade: A Scientist’s Search for Meaning through Making. A materials scientist, engineer, science communicator and occasional stan…
 
The ivory-billed woodpecker is sometimes called the Lord God bird, a nickname it earned because that’s what people cried out the first time they ever saw one: “Lord God, what a bird.” Even though the last confirmed sighting was in the 1930s, birders have been claiming they have seen the Lord God bird throughout the years, turning it into a myth. Th…
 
A recent event was shared on Social Media and immediate discussion began on the event on wide ranging this like PPE selection, objectives, nuance on regulatory interpretations and more. We take the post, along with many comments and discuss them at length. Thank you to our sponsor: First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at …
 
We got a chance to sit down with someone we had a ton of fun chatting with about some exciting new simulation products to make Radiation/Chemical training even better. Take a moment to listen to this and expand your horizons. Learn how Argon simulators enable the world's leading CBRN/HazMat instructors to deliver safe, cost-effective CBRN training …
 
If Ted Talks were around in the early 1990s, Horace Fletcher would have given his fair share of them. Fletcher was a health reformer who thought people didn’t chew their food nearly enough. He believed that most swallowed food way too quickly. This had all sorts of detrimental health consequences, he said, including nasty bowel movements.​​ So he o…
 
A tucked away secret in the vault of the Haz Mat Guys. We get a chance to bring out this topic hoping that we can give you some insight as to the psychology of Hazmat Thank you to our sponsor: First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! Our hazardous materials training manua…
 
#093 - Chocolate Part 3 of 3 Now it's time to dive into one of chocolate's biggest mysteries. Which, depending on where you live, has been something you've wondered for a long time, or you've never even known it was a mystery. Why is chocolate different in the United States? Is it on purpose? If so why? Is there a benefit? Is it because companies i…
 
Shakespeare had a go at at the longest word in the English language with “honorific-abilitude-in-i-tat-i-bus.” If you play the game of stacking suffixes and prefixes together, you can get “antidisestablishmentarianism,” one letter longer for a total of 28 letters. But the longest word by far appeared in 1964 in Chemical Abstracts, a dictionary-like…
 
Bonus Episode: Chemistry at Home 12 Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we combine chocolate and gum. Yep, you read that right. And yes, it's a little gross. Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podc…
 
We take a trip into one of those “You Don’t even know you don’t know” situations. This is a drill you can put on the table at the station and look like an ALL-STAR! Thank you to our sponsor: First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! Our hazardous materials training manual …
 
We might like to think that science is purely objective, driven only by scientific principles and free of social disturbances — but this couldn’t be further from the truth. In this episode, we read Chanda Prescod-Weinstein’s debut The Disordered Cosmos, a book exposing how racism and sexism persist across all scientific disciplines. Part introducti…
 
#092 - Chocolate Part 2 of 3 You know how when you were a kid, you'd sometimes find some old, forgotten halloween chocolate? But the chocolate would look a little white, and if you risked eating it, it would taste weird? Well we're not ashamed to say we've experienced this even as adults, but this time we're taking a close look at this strange myst…
 
Toxic elements like lead, arsenic, mercury, and cadmium in food are not a new problem. But when they show up in pureed vegetables and other foods intended for babies, alarm bells go off. That’s what happened in recent months following a bombshell congressional report that found neurotoxic metals in baby food from multiple manufacturers. In this epi…
 
The debut of the female birth control pill in 1960 was revolutionary. The combination of progesterone and estrogen allowed women to control their reproductive lives much more easily and effectively. But the pill had many unpleasant and even dangerous side effects. In fact, some doctors argue that it wouldn’t win government approval today. So why ha…
 
Bonus Episode: Question and Response 19 In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about leaves, labs you can do at home, electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions, pancakes, easter candy, and more! Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. Want to start your own podcast? Use Tran…
 
We explore AI to design our show, and it goes pretty well. Emerging technology gives us the riff points. Let’s see where this goes. Thank you to our sponsor: First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at THMG e-University here. Courses being added weekly! Our hazardous materials training manual is finally available on Amazon! C…
 
#091 - Chocolate Part 1 of 3 Well you've probably never heard of chocolate, and you've almost certainly never eaten it. But if you had you might wonder, what the heck is this? How do they make it? And why does it taste so gosh darn good? Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
From the Disappearing Spoon, our new podcast! Radium was once the trendiest element in the world. It glowed alluringly in the dark and was hailed it as a medical panacea. It was also the basis of Marie Curie’s research—for which she won her second Nobel Prize in 1911. But by 1920 radium was scarce and its cost was eye-popping: one hundred thousand …
 
How do we breach the topic of a dialog between Hazmat and I/C before the event happens that stresses the system to the point of failure? We begin a journey that discusses some ideas for both supervisors and grunts to engage in to open a door and more. Thank you to our sponsor: First Line Technology and Argon Electronics Register and enroll at THMG …
 
#090 It's of the most puzzling (and heartbreaking) mysteries. Why does cilantro taste so good to some of us, but taste so bad to others of us? Is it in our heads? Or is there a chemical explanation for it? If so, what is it? And can it be fixed? Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
From our new podcast, the Disappearing Spoon: The so-called “Peking Man” fossils are some of the first ancient human remains discovered in mainland Asia. So when they disappeared during World War II, it was called one of the worst disasters in the history of archaeology. Now some archeologists claim to have tracked them down. The only problem is th…
 
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