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O
Orbitals
Miesięcznie
 
A monthly podcast about the molecules that move us, produced by the American Chemical Society.
 
NEWEST UPDATE as of April 2018: Love Science Elements? We’ve got a special treat for all of you loyal fans, because we’re transforming the podcast into something new and very exciting. So stay tuned for more details!
 
Chemical & Engineering News Webinars are thought provoking hour long presentations that support C&EN's mission to provide news and analysis of the chemistry enterprise in a timely, accurate, and balanced fashion. The webinars cover new developments in technology in the chemical, pharmaceutical, life science, and instrumentation industries.
 
A science podcast from Chemical and Engineering News featuring fascinating, weird and otherwise interesting chemistry topics from the American Chemical Society's flagship news publication.
 
R
Reactions
Monthly
 
After several years and millions of views, the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, is bidding farewell to its popular YouTube series Bytesize Science. But you can’t keep a great chemistry video series down for long. We’re proud to announce Reactions, a new weekly video series about the chemistry all around us. For more Reactions videos, please check out our Youtube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/ACSReactions/featured
 
R
Reactions
Monthly
 
After several years and millions of views, the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, is bidding farewell to its popular YouTube series Bytesize Science. But you can’t keep a great chemistry video series down for long. We’re proud to announce Reactions, a new weekly video series about the chemistry all around us. For more Reactions videos, please check out our Youtube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/ACSReactions/featured
 
Periodic audiocasts from American Scientist, a publication of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Honor Society.
 
The Journal of Proteome Research integrates the fields of chemistry, mathematics, applied physics, biology, and medicine in order to better understand the function of proteins in biological systems.
 
P
Prized Science
Щомісяця
 
The American Chemical Society (ACS) gives more than 60 national awards to honor accomplishments in chemistry and service to chemistry. Prized Science strives to give people who may have no special scientific knowledge, the opportunity to watch, listen, and discover how the chemistry behind ACS’ awards transforms life for the better.
 
A
ACS Nano Podcast
Monthly
 
ACS Nano produces regular podcasts that feature interviews with contributors and editors.
 
Interviews with Scholars of Science, Technology, and Society about their New Books
 
Interviews with Scholars of America about their New Books
 
Interviews with Scholars of the American West about their New Books
 
J
JACS Beta Podcast
Harian+
 
This podcast contains all of the audio features that appear on the JACS Beta website (http://pubs.acs.org/JACSbeta).
 
There’s a reason the History Channel has produced hundreds of documentaries about Hitler but only a few about Dwight D. Eisenhower. Bad guys (and gals) are eternally fascinating. Behind the Bastards dives in past the Cliffs Notes of the worst humans in history and exposes the bizarre realities of their lives. Listeners will learn about the young adult novels that helped Hitler form his monstrous ideology, the founder of Blackwater’s insane quest to build his own Air Force, the bizarre lives ...
 
S
Stereo Chemistry
मासिक
 
Stereo Chemistry is C&EN's podcast that delivers chemistry's frontiers to your ears. C&EN is the news magazine of the American Chemical Society.
 
Taking inspiration from trees, scientists have developed a battery made from a sliver of wood coated with tin that shows promise for becoming a tiny, long-lasting, efficient and environmentally friendly energy source. Their report on the device — 1,000 times thinner than a sheet of paper — appears in the journal Nano Letters.
 
C
Congressional Dish
Monthly
 
Congressional Dish is a twice-monthly podcast that aims to draw attention to where the American people truly have power: Congress. From the perspective of a fed up taxpayer with no allegiance to any political party, Jennifer Briney will fill you in on the must-know information about what our representatives do AFTER the elections and how their actions can and will affect our day to day lives. Hosted by @JenBriney. Links to information sources available at www.congressionaldish.com
 
W
We're Alive
Monthly
 
Set 17 years after the main events of WE’RE ALIVE, GOLDRUSH is a recollection story that describes the efforts of the “soldiers” (Greg Muldoon, Anthony Robbins, Carl Thomas, and Samuel Puck) attempt a side mission to retrieve a suspected stash of gold bullion.Told from the perspective of an aging Gen. Puck, he confides this previously undisclosed tale to the only surviving relation of his former team, Alex Robbins, the son of Puck’s friend Anthony. Over the course of ten episodes, the show w ...
 
D
Dr. Rayna G.
Aylık
 
From the prolific author in multiple genres,. Connect the mind, body and spirit from a Native American perspective as we journey through holistic health, politics, family and relationships. Find us on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.
 
N
New Books in History
يوميا
 
Interviews with Historians about their New Books
 
Andy Lopez goes to work with vinegar, a bag of flour, garlic cloves, peppermint soap, and a bottle of Tabasco sauce. He may sound like a Cajun chef, but he’s actually one of the world’s most respected organic gardeners. He uses these items as pesticides. As time passes, more and more so-called safe chemicals are outlawed, he says, after society has been used as a guinea pig. That’s why Lopez promotes organic alternatives through books, tapes, lectures, and radio shows, and now through his we ...
 
E
Earthwise
Monthly
 
Every Earthwise programme features a discussion on conservation, environment or peace with justice. The interview might be with a local Cantabrian, with someone in a different part of the country, or a distinguished person from overseas.Broadcast on the first and third Monday evening at 9pm repeated the following Wednesday at 9:30am.The choice of topics varies considerably. Earthwise hopes that people who are especially interested in conservation will also find peace with justice issues inte ...
 
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In Episode 90, Robert is joined by Katy Stoll and Cody Johnston to discuss the war on clowns. FOOTNOTES: Apu Apustaja Clown faces fine for protesting neo-Nazi march Virginia Man Using Accordion-Playing Clowns To Get Revenge On White Supremacist Swedish neo-Nazis met by clown activists Clowns Attack KKK Rally in Charlotte, NC with Humor Clowns K ...…
 
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George's Community College, takes a very different approach. His unique book, Republic of Numbers: Un ...…
 
Theodore Dalrymple is a retired physician in Great Britain, who has written an account of his year’s-worth of reading the New England Journal of Medicine. In his new book False Positive: A Year of Error, Omission, and Political Correctness in the New England Journal of Medicine (Encounter Books, 2019), he recounts each week’s new edition of the ...…
 
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest to both American and World History; the history of the concept of midwestern history; and a ...…
 
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George's Community College, takes a very different approach. His unique book, Republic of Numbers: Un ...…
 
What makes a good missionary makes a good spy. Or so thought "Wild" Bill Donovan when he secretly recruited a team of religious activists for the Office of Strategic Services. They entered into a world of lies, deception, and murder, confident that their nefarious deeds would eventually help them expand the kingdom of God. In Double Crossed: Th ...…
 
Jolyon Baraka Thomas’s Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan (University of Chicago Press, 2019) challenges the commonsensical notion that the Japanese empire granted its subjects no religious freedom—that, despite the legal provision in the Meiji Constitution of 1890 affirming freedom of worship, “State Shinto” was the ...…
 
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest to both American and World History; the history of the concept of midwestern history; and a ...…
 
A shattering account of the crack cocaine years from award-winning American historian David Farber, Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed (Cambridge University Press, 2019) tells the story of the young men who bet their lives on the rewards of selling 'rock' cocaine, the people who gave themselves over to the crack pip ...…
 
Richard Bell is the author of Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home, published by Simon & Schuster in 2019. Stolen tells the true story of how five young Black boys were kidnapped from Philadelphia in 1825. Dr. Bell recounts the boys’ journey as they were forced to travel south into slavery. Those fami ...…
 
Histories and criticism of comics note that comic strips published in the Progressive Era were dynamic spaces in which anxieties about race, ethnicity, class, and gender were expressed, perpetuated, and alleviated. The proliferation of comic strip children—white and nonwhite, middle-class and lower class, male and female—suggests that childhood ...…
 
In Episode 89, Robert is joined by Eric Lampaert to discuss Bjorn Lomborg. FOOTNOTES: 1. Bjorn Lomborg’s lukewarmer misinformation about climate change and poverty 2. BJORN LOMBORG: PERFORMANCE ARTIST EXTRAORDINAIRE 3, Bjorn Lomborg Bibliography 4. Hot, It’s Not 5. On Bjorn Lomborg and extinction 6. The Skeptical Environmentalist: A Case Study ...…
 
While the mainstream discourses on global warming characterize it as an unprecedented catastrophe that unites the globe in a common challenge, Elizabeth DeLoughrey argues that this apparently cosmopolitan position is in truth a provincial one limited to privileged circles in the Global North. In Allegories of the Anthropocene (Duke University P ...…
 
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examin ...…
 
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examin ...…
 
The rules of the Atlas are established forcing the soldiers to weigh what is truly valuable in their world. Life underground has a multitude of benefits, but the costs run deep as the dwellers beneath the eartch come clean about their struggles. A simple game between friends tests the strength of their bonds. Set 17 years after the main events ...…
 
Who has the right to have rights? Motivated by Hannah Arendt’s famous reflections on the question of statelessness the book tells a non-linear global story of the emergence and transformations of human rights in the age of nation-states. In his new book A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States (Princeton ...…
 
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examin ...…
 
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examin ...…
 
“There are only two ways to live your life,” said Albert Einstein, “One is as though nothing is a miracle; the other is as though everything is a miracle.” Oren Harman clearly agrees with Einstein’s sentiments. In Evolutions: Fifteen Myths That Explain Our World (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), Harman takes scientific facts, as we know them t ...…
 
Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be a researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. In his new book, Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine (Harry N. Abrams, ...…
 
Tehama Lopez Bunyasi and Candis Watts Smith have written an accessible and important book about the #BlackLivesMatter social movement and broader considerations of, essentially, how we got to where we are, in the United States, in regard to race and racism. They also go on to suggest and encourage readers and citizens to move towards a more equ ...…
 
Wonderfully concise and very readable, A Brief History of Spain (Robinson, 2019), is perfect for travelers as well as the discerning reader. Professor of History at Exeter University Jeremy Black’s book is a ‘must read’. This is an extraordinary tale of Spain, from early tribalism and Roman rule to the Moorish conquest in the 8th century, Spain ...…
 
Neoliberalism is one of those fuzzy words that can mean something different to everyone. Wendy Brown is one of the world’s leading scholars on neoliberalism and argue that a generation of neoliberal worldview among political, business, and intellectual leaders led to the populism we’re seeing throughout the world today. But is it mutually exclu ...…
 
Tehama Lopez Bunyasi and Candis Watts Smith have written an accessible and important book about the #BlackLivesMatter social movement and broader considerations of, essentially, how we got to where we are, in the United States, in regard to race and racism. They also go on to suggest and encourage readers and citizens to move towards a more equ ...…
 
Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be a researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. In his new book, Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine (Harry N. Abrams, ...…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Rafia Zafar about her 2019 book Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning, from the University of Georgia Press. It’s part of the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People and Place series. The book contains 7 chapters, covering the earliest formally-published Africa ...…
 
Maria Nugent talks about Aboriginal Australians first encounter with Captain Cook at Botany Bay, a violent meeting has come to represent the origin story of Australia’s colonization by Europeans. The encounter itself has been symbolized by a bark shield – said to have been used by indigenous Australians defending themselves against gunfire from ...…
 
How can the history of rubber be used as a way to understand the history of 20th-century Vietnam? In this episode of New Books in History, Michael G. Vann talks about Rubber and the Making of Vietnam: An Ecological History, 1897-1975 (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), with Michitake Aso, an Associate Professor of history at SUNY Albany ...…
 
Strange Trips isn’t only the title of Dr. Lucas Richert’s new book; it’s also a good description of the journey substances take from the black market to the doctor’s black bag—and, sometimes, back to the black market again. In Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs (McGill-Queens UP, 2019), Richert investigates the myths, ...…
 
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Rafia Zafar about her 2019 book Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning, from the University of Georgia Press. It’s part of the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People and Place series. The book contains 7 chapters, covering the earliest formally-published Africa ...…
 
Strange Trips isn’t only the title of Dr. Lucas Richert’s new book; it’s also a good description of the journey substances take from the black market to the doctor’s black bag—and, sometimes, back to the black market again. In Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs (McGill-Queens UP, 2019), Richert investigates the myths, ...…
 
How can the history of rubber be used as a way to understand the history of 20th-century Vietnam? In this episode of New Books in History, Michael G. Vann talks about Rubber and the Making of Vietnam: An Ecological History, 1897-1975 (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), with Michitake Aso, an Associate Professor of history at SUNY Albany ...…
 
Strange Trips isn’t only the title of Dr. Lucas Richert’s new book; it’s also a good description of the journey substances take from the black market to the doctor’s black bag—and, sometimes, back to the black market again. In Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs (McGill-Queens UP, 2019), Richert investigates the myths, ...…
 
In Part Two, Robert is joined again by Jamie Loftus to continue discussing Ragnar Redbeard. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisersBy iHeartRadio.
 
"On Christmas Eve, 1911, John Wanamaker stood in the middle of his elaborately decorated department store building in Philadelphia as shoppers milled around him picking up last minute Christmas presents. On that night, as for years to come, the store was filled with the sound of Christmas carols sung by thousands of shoppers, accompanied by the ...…
 
In October 1902, the reservoir of the first Aswan Dam filled, and Egypt's relationship with the Nile River forever changed. Flooding villages of historical northern Nubia and filling the irrigation canals that flowed from the river, the perennial Nile not only reshaped agriculture and the environment, but also Egypt's colonial economy and forms ...…
 
The United States Supreme Court operates to resolve disputes among lower courts and the other branches of government, allowing elected officials, citizens, and businesses to act without legal uncertainty. Yet a Court that prioritizes resolving many disputes sometimes will produce contradictory opinions or fail to provide a rationale for its dec ...…
 
"On Christmas Eve, 1911, John Wanamaker stood in the middle of his elaborately decorated department store building in Philadelphia as shoppers milled around him picking up last minute Christmas presents. On that night, as for years to come, the store was filled with the sound of Christmas carols sung by thousands of shoppers, accompanied by the ...…
 
In October 1902, the reservoir of the first Aswan Dam filled, and Egypt's relationship with the Nile River forever changed. Flooding villages of historical northern Nubia and filling the irrigation canals that flowed from the river, the perennial Nile not only reshaped agriculture and the environment, but also Egypt's colonial economy and forms ...…
 
A "thank you" bonus episode featuring information on a congressional resignation, a long list of future congressional quitters, dizzy spells, and a disappearing airline. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute a lump sum or set up a monthly contribution via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for eac ...…
 
Building on nearly two decades of scholarship about sectarianism and communal relations in the Modern Middle East, Ussama Makdisi’s latest book, Age of Coexistence: The Ecumenical Frame and the Making of the Modern Arab World(University of California Press, 2019) dispels the myth that the Middle East is inherently or inescapably sectarian and c ...…
 
Military history is thought by some to be a valuable field of study to both professional soldiers and civilians. It is indeed one of the most popular fields in the genre of history. And yet many academics tend to look down upon the field as fundamentally unserious and not therefore meriting attention by academic based historians. Historian Jere ...…
 
Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres' new book Black British Migrants in Cuba: Race, Labor, and Empire in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean, 1898–1948 (Cambridge University Press, 2018) invites readers to enter the world of empire and labor migration in all its complexity. Giovannetti-Torres focuses on the workers and their interactions with British colon ...…
 
On April 8, 1865, after four years of civil war, General Robert E. Lee wrote to General Ulysses S. Grant asking for peace. Peace was beyond his authority to negotiate, Grant replied, but surrender terms he would discuss. As Gregory P. Downs, Professor of History at the University of California, Davis, reveals in this gripping history of post–Ci ...…
 
Why Don′t Women Rule the World?: Understanding Women′s Civic and Political Choices (Sage, 2019) is a comprehensive and useful addition to the established literature on women and politics. This book, authored by four political scientists with a diversity of training and expertise, delves into a broad and extensive overview of the issues that hav ...…
 
Was ancient India ruled by politics or religion? In The History of the Arthaśāstra: Sovereignty and Sacred Law in Ancient India (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Mark McClish explores the Arthaśāstra (ancient India’s foundational treatise on statecraft and governance) to problematize the common scholarly idea that politics in ancient India wa ...…
 
On April 8, 1865, after four years of civil war, General Robert E. Lee wrote to General Ulysses S. Grant asking for peace. Peace was beyond his authority to negotiate, Grant replied, but surrender terms he would discuss. As Gregory P. Downs, Professor of History at the University of California, Davis, reveals in this gripping history of post–Ci ...…
 
In the 1960s the drug thalidomide caused over 10,000 babies across the globe to be born with deformed limbs. Scientist Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey blocked its production in the US, saving countless lives. But since then thalidomide has been approved by the FDA. Why? Today we tackle how thalidomide's chemistry caused a pharmaceutical disaster and ...…
 
In episode 88, Robert is joined by Jamie Loftus to discuss Ragnar Redbeard, the socialist turned Proto-Nazi who inspired a mass shooting. FOOTNOTES: 1. Festival shooter Santino Legan wore tactical gear, sunglasses and a ballcap. He 'seemed confident in his use of the gun.' 2. Desmond, Arthur (1859–1926) 3. Ragnar Redbeard’s Might Is Right or th ...…
 
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