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Welcome to The Sara Avant Stover Podcast, a space to come home to your inner wisdom. Join Sara, bestselling author of The Way of the Happy Woman and The Book of SHE, and a teacher of women’s yoga, meditation, and spirituality, as she shares dharma talks and conversations about the feminine spiritual path. Born from Sara's own desire to hear dharma talks (which are what the Buddhist tradition calls wisdom teachings) through the distinct lens–and voice–of the Sacred Feminine, this podcast will ...
 
Zero Squared is a philosophy podcast from Zero Books. Zero publishes radical philosophy, aesthetics, film theory, experimental fiction, and anything else that smells faintly of the avant-garde. Our books aim not only to demonstrate how philosophical ideas are relevant to every day life, but also to change the terms of it. Douglas Lain is the host of this podcast and the publisher of Zero Books. He hosted the Diet Soap podcast out of this feed for five years. Zero Squared will continue the tr ...
 
A podcast about how to turn fears of getting started into being in love with the process and how to keep going. Providing easy exercises and activities that can be done in the moment or are small steps towards your bigger goal. Hosted by Christina Barsi, founder of Avant Haüs Media, a podcast production & consulting company that wants to help people create and find inspiration.
 
Emanating from KPFK 90.7 FM in Los Angeles, Head Room is a wide-open venue for exploratory rock and roll, be it psychedelic pioneers such as the Grateful Dead, vintage prog, contemporary jam-rock, new music from myriad experimental, improvisational, accidental, avant-freak, wyrd-folk, and psychedelic cabaret artists or any other aural anomalies emanating from the nethersphere. Special emphasis is given to interesting offbeat local acts currently making the scene in Los Angeles.
 
Music mixes by dj Panda Magic that span genres such as house, ambient, electronica, dub, lo fi, leftfield pop, chillout, vinyl/cassette obscurities, drone, avant-classical, trip hop, exotica, experimental, and maybe jazz? Expect brand new tracks mixed with 80s/90s relics. Selected older mixes from the archives (currently up on mixcloud) will be posted in between the new episodes. Full tracklists always available at https://pandamagicmixes.com/
 
The Palgary Almanac alternates with the Rambler's Almanac every Thursday morning. The Palgary Almanac Thoughtfully curated new music spanning the genres of experimental, avant-pop, electronic, folk, world, and hip-hop featuring interviews on the subjects of art, politics and community in Calgary, Alberta and beyond. Hosted by Peter Oliver. Facebook Twitter The Rambler's Almanac On the Rambler’s Almanac, not all those who wander are lost. Start off on the right foot and get your bearings with ...
 
This podcast features interviews with prominent musicians, analyses of great modern and contemporary works, and lectures / concerts by Samuel Andreyev. Samuel Andreyev is a composer, oboist and professor residing in Strasbourg, France.The material on this podcast is sometimes unique to this format, sometimes derived from Samuel Andreyev's public lectures and YouTube channel. Support the podcast: www.patreon.com/samuelandreyev or www.samuelandreyev.com/donate
 
Musician, actor, composer, trumpeter, AcidBenci, electronic liveact artist, electrojazzist experimental, avant-garde techno punk ... Usually set in thinking, not ready figures, songs. For me, music is more important than the birth of the process as it is recorded! We love generated by the improvisation and ambient atmospheric sounds, which is very specific to my music!
 
Embark on a late night journey into the most profound Kabbalistic secrets of the Torah. Follow along in the book as we climb from the highest peaks of Chassidic thought into the deepest canyons of the soul, in these avant garde teachings from the writings of Rabbi Schneir Zalman of Liadi on the weekly Torah portion.
 
A lot of good music starts in the garage, and then works its way into your ears. The mechanics here have been putting together a weekly mix tape for your ears, and car stereo, off and on for 25+ years. This show tries to help guide you to the quirky coolness that's always existed left of the dial, as we broadcast out of our garage, and into yours. Sponsored by the Chemistry Association of Canada: Responsible Care
 
Enticing, sometimes challenging, music from the vast underground for thirsty ears and enquiring minds: post-punk, instrumental, math rock, avant, jazz, electronic, indie, funk and global grooves. Kerry has been mashing up independent, non-commercial sounds that cross disciplines and decades since 1987. Sponsored by Community Natural Foods
 
Born an enterprising, forward-thinking and original "Avant-Garde" female, I believe in living a mission-inspired and purposeful life! I am passionate about inspiring women to live into their potential and elevate their confidence, especially visionary female leaders who are looking to scale up their business venture. My work is primarily with Founders, Leaders and professionals (6-figure+), and mission-inspired businesses or social enterprise groups, those who empower other women are especia ...
 
Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s short masterpiece about a ranting, slightly mad civil servant. The stylistic inventiveness, and the insights into the absurdities and weakness of humans seem so fresh and incisive today that if published now (a century and a half later) Notes would be considered an avant-garde post-modernist triumph. In some ways this is a heavy text, laden with conversational philosophizing; but the vividness of the narrator make it a wonderful read, and funny. (Review by Hugh McGuire)
 
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Today I have a really wonderful conversation to share with you. Spring Washam is a well-known meditation teacher, author, and visionary leader based in California and Peru. I first came across Spring this past summer, just after George Floyd’s murder when the Black Lives Matter movement really burst into the collective field. At that time I saw an …
 
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Ara Marjian, Professor of Italian and affiliate of the Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History at New York University about his newest book Against the Avant-Garde: Pier Paolo Pasolini, Contemporary Art, and Neocapitalism (University of Chicago Press, 2020). Paosolini, …
 
“What are chromosomes? And what does it mean to treat them as visual objects?” asks Soraya de Chadarevian in her new book, Heredity Under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome (University of Chicago Press, 2020). Considering this question as she follows the history of microscope-based practices in chromosomal research across…
 
First published by Simon & Schuster in 1993 and then by Continuum in 1998, Jim Mason’s An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature has become a classic. With a new Lantern edition expected in early 2021, the book explores, from an anthropological, sociocultural, and holistic perspective, how and why we have cut ourselves off from oth…
 
Dr. Victoria Phillips adeptly tells the story of Martha Graham's role as diplomat, arts innovator, and dancer. Her book Martha Graham's Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy (Oxford UP, 2019) is a look at the years that her company toured the world as an example of American democracy and freedom. Martha Graham's Cold War frames the story of Mar…
 
Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies (Liverpool UP, 2020) explores how a set of inter-related digital projects are transforming our vision of the Enlightenment. The featured projects are some of the best known, well-funded and longest established research initiatives in the emerging area of ‘di…
 
Writing to U.S. President Grover Cleveland in 1888, Oglala Lakota leaders Little Wound, Young Man Afraid of His Horses, and Red Cloud insisted upon a simple yet significant demand to allow western Indigenous nations to retain intertribal communication networks, stating that "we do not want the gates closed between us." These vast networks - and the…
 
For four decades, Lamont "Monty" Lindstrom has conducted research on the island of Tanna in the Pacific nation of Vanuatu. Considered by outsiders to be incredibly exotic, Tanna attracts tourists who come to see its active volcano, cargo cults, and customary practices. Lindstrom presents a different vision of Tanna in his new book, Tanna Times: Isl…
 
In Enduring Cancer: Life, Death, and Diagnosis in Delhi (Duke UP, 2020) Dwaipayan Banerjee explores the efforts of Delhi's urban poor to create a livable life with cancer as patients and families negotiate an overextended health system unequipped to respond to the disease. Owing to long wait times, most urban poor cancer patients do not receive a d…
 
In 1996 Argentina adopted genetically modified (GM) soybeans as a central part of its national development strategy. Today, Argentina is the third largest global grower and exporter of GM crops. Its soybeans—which have been modified to tolerate being sprayed with herbicides—now cover half of the country's arable land and represent a third of its to…
 
Aristotle, the co-called father of rhetoric, supposedly conceptualized his theory of persuasion as a means of bringing meaning to rest. But what if there’s another story, one in which forgotten tropes such as alloiosis turn rhetoric toward the flux and difference? On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (s/t) Drs. Jane Sutton and M…
 
Kind words are a creative force, a power that concurs in the building up of all that is good, and energy that showers blessings upon the world." —Lawrence G. Lovasik The power of words has changed my life many times but one of the most powerful ways in which I had to discover the way I used my OWN words was when I was asked to observe how I talk to…
 
In this far-ranging and erudite exploration of the South Asian past, Sumit Guha discusses the shaping of social and historical memory in world-historical context. He presents memory as the result of both remembering and forgetting and of the preservation, recovery, and decay of records. By describing how these processes work through sociopolitical …
 
For centuries Southeast Asia has enjoyed a relatively pleasant relationship with China, its massive neighbor to the north. While Chinese merchants and laborers were common throughout the region, with exception of a 1,000-year occupation of northern Vietnam, China has rarely attempted to exercise control over Southeast Asia. However, in the past two…
 
Ellen Lamont's new book The Mating Game: How Gender Still Shapes How We Date (University of California Press, 2020) offers an in-depth analysis of how gender shapes dating practices. Despite enormous changes in patterns of dating and courtship in twenty-first-century America, contemporary understandings of romance and intimacy remain firmly rooted …
 
The Emergence of the Gulf States: Studies in Modern History (Bloomsbury, 2016) offers an overview of the history of Saudi Arabia and the five Persian/Arabian Gulf states that emerged from British rule between 1961 and 1971--including Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. The book synthesized the works of many academics, all ex…
 
Common morality has been the touchstone of medical ethics since the publication of Beauchamp and Childress's Principles of Biomedical Ethics in 1979. Rosamond Rhodes challenges this dominant view by presenting an original and novel account of the ethics of medicine, one deeply rooted in the actual experience of medical professionals. She argues tha…
 
In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country's most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they…
 
King of Britain for sixty years and the last king of what would become the United States, George III inspired both hatred and loyalty and is now best known for two reasons: as a villainous tyrant for America's Founding Fathers, and for his madness, both of which have been portrayed on stage and screen. In George III: Madness and Majesty (Penguin, 2…
 
Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology (Oxford University Press, 2020) focuses on the emerging scientific discipline of astrobiology, exploring many of the humanistic issues this multidisciplinary field is generating. Despite there being myriad scientific questions that astrobiologists have only begun to address, this is not a purely scientif…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
Michael Mascarenhas's book Lessons in Environmental Justice: From Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter and Idle No More (Sage, 2020) provides an entry point to the field by bringing together the works of individuals who are creating a new and vibrant wave of environmental justice scholarship. methodology, and activism. The 18 essays in this collectio…
 
The politics of identity have played center stage in many political debates in the last few years, and is often seen somewhat pejoratively as an epiphenomenal manifestation of the dynamics of capitalism. Some scholars, however, see this as a reductive mistake, not just for any attempt to organize against capitalism, but also as part of a mistaken u…
 
This Pop the Left podcast features Derick Varn, and Douglas Lain as they continue their conversation about the writings of Christopher Lasch and specifically examine his essay "Is Revolution Obsolete?" from his book A World of Nations. The ideas of Harold Cruse will also be examined as we try to wrangle out just what contemporary socialists can gai…
 
In this episode Derick talks about data misuse, using advanced technology regardless of the consequence, and sends a message to the people of Portland. He breaks down the Facebook data misuse of Cambridge Analytica (1:55), being cornered in by social media platforms that have monopolized on our dependency to their technology (3:14), social media sh…
 
This is my resting “no” face. It’s here! The final minisode of season four (and frankly, probably, all?) of Secret Feminist Agenda! Ending this podcast series, in its current form at least, is a way of saying no to one thing so that other things will be possible. So join me for one last exploration of the feminist power of refusal. Also: links! You…
 
This is my resting “no” face. It’s here! The final minisode of season four (and frankly, probably, all?) of Secret Feminist Agenda! Ending this podcast series, in its current form at least, is a way of saying no to one thing so that other things will be possible. So join me for one last exploration of the feminist power of refusal. Also: links! You…
 
It is often assumed that creative people are prone to psychological instability, and that this explains apparent associations between cultural production and mental health problems. In their detailed study of recording and performing artists in the British music industry, Sally Anne Gross and George Musgrave turn this view on its head. By listening…
 
“Awareness of the EU's undeniable past and present importance can - and has - led to complacency and hubris. There is nothing inevitable about European integration". So writes Mark Gilbert in European Integration: A Political History (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020), a compact, narrative history of the European Communities and the European Union pitc…
 
In India, the practice of jugaad—finding workarounds or hacks to solve problems—emerged out of subaltern strategies of negotiating poverty, discrimination, and violence but is now celebrated in management literature as a disruptive innovation. In Jugaad Time: The Ecologies of Everyday Hacking in India (Duke UP, 2019) Amit S. Rai explores how jugaad…
 
How was the relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim communities theologically and spatially imagined in the premodern world? How did religious hierarchies map onto notions of place and spatial distinction and hierarchies? In her dazzling new book Minding their Place: Space and Religious Hierarchy in Ibn al-Qayyim’s Aḥkām ahl al-Dhimma (Brill, 20…
 
Zhuangzi and the Becoming of Nothingness (SUNY Press, 2018) offers a radical rereading of the Daoist classic Zhuangzi by bringing to light the role of nothingness in grounding the cosmological and metaphysical aspects of its thought. Through a careful analysis of the text and its appended commentaries, David Chai reveals not only how nothingness ph…
 
When are borders justified? Who has a right to control them? Where should they be drawn? Today people think of borders as an island's shores. Just as beaches delimit a castaway's realm, so borders define the edges of a territory, occupied by a unified people, to whom the land legitimately belongs. Hence a territory is legitimate only if it belongs …
 
Behind the braided wigs, buckskins, and excess bronzer that typified the mid-century "filmic Indian" lies a far richer, deeper history of Indigenous labor, survival, and agency. This history takes center stage in historian Liza Black's new book, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960 (University of Nebraska Press, 2020), which looks…
 
Behind the braided wigs, buckskins, and excess bronzer that typified the mid-century "filmic Indian" lies a far richer, deeper history of Indigenous labor, survival, and agency. This history takes center stage in historian Liza Black's new book, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960 (University of Nebraska Press, 2020), which looks…
 
Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation (Basic Books, 2016) that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident …
 
How did public demand shape education in the 20th century? In The Crisis of the Meritocracy: Britain’s Transition to Mass Education since the Second World War (Oxford UP, 2020), Peter Mandler, Professor of Modern Cultural History at the University of Cambridge, charts the history of schools, colleges, and universities. The book charts the tension b…
 
Listen to this interview of Shyam Sharma, author of Writing Support for International Graduate Students: Enhancing Transition and Success (Routledge, 2020). We talk about international students and rhetoric, international students and confidence, international students and community-based programming, and vision. Interviewer : "Could you give an ex…
 
Singapore’s history has generally been represented through a linear, upward trajectory “from Third World to the First,” in the words of the postcolonial state’s founding father Lee Kuan Yew. In his book Singapore: A Modern History (Bloomsbury, 2020), Michael D. Barr synthesizes a story that complicates this progress narrative and critiques the foun…
 
Playlist: silver mt. zion - god bless our dead marines adrian young and ali shaheed - conexâo do make say think - frederica beabadoobee - horen sarrison stripmall - christina's world betty davis - they say i'm different the sonics - shot down brad mehidau & mark guilliana - taming the dragon Clowder ov Death - casual stroll kashi bashi - this must …
 
Johan von Sydow, director of TINY TIM: KING FOR A DAY, joins the show to discuss his documentary, the weird persona of Tiny Tim, and the strange vulnerability behind the falsetto voice. See TINY TIM: KING FOR A DAY as part of the CUFF.Docs film festival. Rambler's Almanac Ep 42: Migrant workers in Calgary and across Alberta, a biography of Tiny Tim…
 
“Imagine you live in a freewheeling city like New York or London – one of the world’s leading financial, educational, and cultural centres. Then imagine that one of the world’s most infamous authoritarian regimes makes direct control over your city, introducing secret police, warrant less surveillance and searches, massive repression and the arrest…
 
In the Failures of Ethics: Confronting the Holocaust, Genocide and Other Mass Atrocities (Oxford University Press, 2018), John K. Roth concentrates on the multiple shortfalls and shortcomings of thought, decision, and action that tempt and incite humans to inflict incalculable harm upon other humans. Absent the overriding of moral sensibilities, if…
 
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