show episodes
 
Sometimes challenging, often disturbing, occasionally absurd, always timely: Criminal Injustice explores the most complex and urgent issues facing the U.S. criminal justice system in conversation with the field's most knowledgeable experts. Professor David Harris and guests take on everything from racial bias to use of force... from surveillance technology to mass incarceration... and from police abuse and misconduct to the astonishing, frequently hilarious misdeeds of "Lawyers Behaving Badl ...
 
Amplified Voices is a podcast that lifts the voices of people and families impacted by the criminal legal system. Hosts Jason and Amber speak with real people in real communities to help them step into the power of their lived experience. Together, they explore shared humanity and real solutions for positive change.
 
Let’s Talk Reform is brought to you by SJAIP, a collaborative initiative by a team of scientists working to elevate the discussion around social and mental health needs in the school-to-prison pipeline and United States criminal justice system. Every week we sit down with community champions, educators, and advocates working to change the system we see today. Tune in and join the conversation.
 
The Prison Post is a podcast interviewing leaders in the criminal justice reform, restorative justice, and social justice movements. In addition, we share the transformational stories of the currently and formerly incarcerated and highlight what CROP Organization is doing by reimagining reentry for returning citizens.
 
Each week, Rebekah Sebastian interviews fascinating people connected to true crime and criminal justice in unique ways. From veteran attorneys like Kirk Nurmi ( Jodi Arias) and David Rudolf ( Michael Peterson) to retired law enforcement officials. Cult experts and cult survivors, your favorite podcasters like Justin Evans ( Generation Why), Maggie Freleng (Unjust and Unsolved), and Katie + Kimberly. ( A Date with Dateline) From victims advocates to courageous survivors, together they explore ...
 
Podcast for the Criminal Justice Section of the American Bar Association. We'll talk current issues in criminal justice reform, policy and the Supreme Court. We'll discuss the work of the Criminal Justice Section including events, Task Forces, Standards, the ABA's ICC project and more. This is the Criminal Justice Section of the ABA’s podcast, and may not contain official ABA policy statements. For the ABA’s Code of Online Conduct visit here: https://www.americanbar.org/about_the_aba/codeofc ...
 
From the Oregon Center on Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice, this series shines a light on partnerships that are moving the dial, leading to better solutions and outcomes for people who may become involved with the justice system due to experiencing behavioral health, intellectual/developmental disabilities, or neurocognitive concerns. We talk with guests representing prominent voices from government, the judicial system, public safety, healthcare, and the broader community throughout m ...
 
Welcome to "Let's Talk Prevention!," a podcast of VASA (Voices Against Substance Abuse). VASA is a community coalition that researches and implements strategies related to substance use and misuse. It is a program of VOICE (Viable Options in Community Endeavors, Inc.), a nonprofit that teaches critical life skills to children and families. Each month, join VASA and expert guests as they discuss their knowledge, thoughts, and first-hand experiences. voiceinc.org ∙ vasa@voiceinc.org ∙ 254.741. ...
 
The show that take you straight into the trenches of justice! Where the: passion, players, and consequences are real. Each episode we examine current events happening in the system. From the battles in courtrooms to the streets demanding reform. We bring those stories here to you, THE MEMBERS OF THE JURY!... Because we aren't afraid to"Take it to The Box!"
 
Brought to you by Jill Wine-Banks and Victor Shi, the Intergenerational Politics Podcast tackles the issues facing our nation, asks the questions you want to be answered, and most importantly, engages all generations in politics. Jill Wine-Banks is the only woman to have served on the Watergate prosecution team, is an MSNBC Legal Analyst, and is the author of "The Watergate Girl: My Fight for Truth and Justice Against a Criminal President." Victor Shi is a freshman at UCLA, the youngest dele ...
 
A true crime podcast. A tale of hidden evidence, unintended consequences and a wrongful conviction. Season One of Aggravating Circumstances tells the story of Destry Cord McKinney a musician, studio producer, combat medic and father. This is a continuing story so be sure to start with episode one. Season Two is the stabbing of Elisha Baxter, Season Three is The Conspiracy to Convict Tommy Hall. See more at https://aggravatingcircumstances.com/
 
NACDL’s State Criminal Justice Network (SCJN), has initiated a conference call series entitled National Advocacy Calls on Developing Legislation (NACDL). The teleconferences generally feature an expert on an issue area and are designed to inform criminal defense lawyers and advocates across the country on a variety of criminal justice issues. Key to the calls is informing participants of any legislation or litigation pending that seeks progressive reform on the issue, and serves as a call to ...
 
Plead the Fifth is a platform for attorneys to talk about the jurisprudence of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. In each episode, we pick several newly issued cases from the docket, and we invite experienced appellate attorneys to discuss the significance of those cases. Our discussions focus on issues that relate to civil rights and the criminal justice reform.
 
Originally this podcast focused exclusively on topics surrounding Spirituality. With recent events and the turmoil concerning the murder of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis Police Department along with the murders of countless others, a major paradigm shift is underway within our society. This show will expand its programming to include topics that highlight our desire to eradicate inequality, systemic racism, and to gain greater accountability from our elected leaders and the la ...
 
Merrittocracy is a show about how to make America a better place. Interviewing scholars, politicians, artists, and activists, Keri Leigh Merritt gets to the heart of what this country needs to join the ranks of other developed nations. From criminal justice reform and affordable housing to job guarantees and multicultural organizing, Merrittocracy helps lay the groundwork for a more prosperous future for every American.
 
The Warrant is an initiative of the Centre for Criminal Justice Reform and Capacity Building (C3) at the Research Society of International Law, Pakistan (RSIL), an independent, non-partisan think tank based in Pakistan. C3 amalgamates RSIL’s capacities in research and analysis, policy formulation, legislative drafting, governance and administrative strengthening, statistical analysis, technological innovation, and capacity building to provide contextualized evidence-based solutions to crimin ...
 
Justice in America, hosted by Josie Duffy Rice and Clint Smith, is a podcast for everyone interested in criminal justice reform— from those new to the system to experts who want to know more. Each episode we cover a new criminal justice issue. We explain how it works and look at its impact on people, particularly poor people and people of color. We’ll also interview activists, practitioners, experts, journalists, organizers, and others, to learn. By the end of the episode, you’ll walk away w ...
 
After being convicted as an adult at the age of 16 and having served 15 years in prison, life has been one hell of a ride! Learn about my personal transformation and how I went from a gang member to a now Criminal Justice Reform advocate and camp counselor. Follow me as we jump into cultural topics and discuss political issues that affect our communities. Don’t miss out join the conversation!
 
Welcome to NACDL's podcast series, "The Criminal Docket," hosted by Ivan J. Dominguez, NACDL's senior director of public affairs & communications. NACDL is the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and is well-known to many as "Liberty's Last Champion." Each episode of "The Criminal Docket" explores important items on the criminal justice agenda, in-depth, with top leaders in the legal practice, public policy, journalism, academia, and others whose lives intersect with the crimina ...
 
The criminal justice system in the United States of America incarcerates more people than any other country in the world. Join ex-Probation Officer and abolitionist student, Jordan Perry, every month for interviews of various criminal justice reform advocates and previously incarcerated individuals to discuss how the criminal justice system is going through transformative change in New York State. Mini-episodes will also break down the injustices of the criminal justice system that advocates ...
 
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show series
 
For most of our time on this planet, vermin were considered humanity's common inheritance. Fleas, lice, bedbugs, and rats were universal scourges, as pervasive as hunger or cold, at home in both palaces and hovels. But with the spread of microscopic close-ups of these creatures, the beginnings of sanitary standards, and the rising belief that clean…
 
Wonder how America's individual inventors persisted alongside corporate R&D labs as an important source of inventions beginning at the turn of the early twentieth century? American Independent Inventors in an Era of Corporate R&D (MIT Press, 2021) by Eric S. Hintz presents a candid look into the history behind the phenomenon. During the nineteenth …
 
At the heart of human intelligence rests a fundamental puzzle: How are we incredibly smart and stupid at the same time? No existing machine can match the power and flexibility of human perception, language, and reasoning. Yet, we routinely commit errors that reveal the failures of our thought processes. What Makes Us Smart: The Computational Logic …
 
With a focus on the court diversion of disabled people, Disability, Criminal Justice and Law: Reconsidering Court Diversion (Routledge 2020) undertakes a theoretical and empirical examination of how law is complicit in debilitating disabled people. In our post-institutionalisation era, diversion of disabled people from the court process is often as…
 
Today I talked to Beth Alvarado about her new novel Jillian in the Borderlands (Black Lawrence Press, 2020) We first meet Jillian Guzmán when she is nine. She’s mute, has a big imagination, and communicates through her drawings. She and her mother, Angie O’Malley live in the borderlands of Arizona and Mexico. Jillian can see ghosts – in the first s…
 
Listen to this interview of Jonathan Zimmerman, Professor of History of Education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education and author of The Amateur Hour: A History of College Teaching in America (Johns Hopkins UP, 2020). We talk about yesterday today. Jonathan Zimmerman : "Look, I don't think anyone questions that some of the…
 
Washington, DC is known as the birthplace of hardcore punk. The raw, innovative, new sound coming out of the nation’s capital in the late 1970s is examined in Shayna Maskell’s Politics as Sound: The Washington, DC, Hardcore Scene, 1978-1983 (U Illinois Press, 2021). Maskell examines the DC hardcore scene between 1978 and 1983, focusing on the bands…
 
Oaxaca, in the view of the Mexican federal government, was in need of serious reform at midcentury. Reports detailing issues of land ownership, language education, and poverty prompted the Institutio Nacional Indigenista (INI) to pursue a number of reforms to integrate Oaxaca and its people into the nation. But where federal policy met local practi…
 
Though trained as a medical doctor, chemist Harvey Wiley spent most of his professional life advocating for "pure food"—food free of both adulterants and preservatives. A strong proponent of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, still the basis of food safety legislation in the United States, Wiley gained fame for what became known as the Poison Squa…
 
With a focus on the court diversion of disabled people, Disability, Criminal Justice and Law: Reconsidering Court Diversion (Routledge 2020) undertakes a theoretical and empirical examination of how law is complicit in debilitating disabled people. In our post-institutionalisation era, diversion of disabled people from the court process is often as…
 
Why do newborns show a preference for a face (or something that resembles a face) over a nonface-like object? Why do baby chicks prefer a moving object to an inanimate one? Neither baby human nor baby chick has had time to learn to like faces or movement. In Born Knowing: Imprinting and the Origins of Knowledge (MIT Press, 2021), neuroscientist Gio…
 
The Malleability of Memory is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Elizabeth Loftus, a world-renowned expert on human memory and Distinguished Professor of Psychological Science; Criminology, Law, and Society; Cognitive Science and Law at UC Irvine. This extensive conversation covers her ground-breaking work on the mis…
 
Our universe might appear chaotic, but deep down it's simply a myriad of rules working independently to create patterns of action, force, and consequence. In Ten Patterns That Explain the Universe (MIT Press, 2021), Brian Clegg explores the phenomena that make up the very fabric of our world by examining ten essential sequenced systems. From diagra…
 
Kyokutei Bakin's Nansō Satomi hakkenden is one of the monuments of Japanese literature. This multigenerational samurai saga was one of the most popular and influential books of the nineteenth century and has been adapted many times into film, television, fiction, and comics. An Ill-Considered Jest, the first part of Hakkenden, tells the story of th…
 
In this episode Kimon and Richard discuss the role of ego among entrepreneurs: how while self confidence is necessary and positive, entrepreneurs who put themselves and their own personality at the centre of everything often hold the company back. They discuss the impact of ego in sales, where entrepreneurs must be able to face and embrace rejectio…
 
How can farmers adapt to climate changes? How can regenerative farmers have livelihoods that nourish themselves and their communities? How can we break free of the commodity mindset and rethink the US food system? Bob Quinn’s remarkable memoir of his decades living and working on a Montana farm offers unique insights into all of these pressing ques…
 
What is your conscience? Is it, as Peter Cajka asks in this provocative book, “A small, still voice? A cricket perched on your shoulder? An angel and devil who compete for your attention?” Going back at least to the thirteenth century, Catholics viewed their personal conscience as a powerful and meaningful guide to align their conduct with worldly …
 
Despite Britain's entering the 20th century as the dominant world power, its public discourses were imbued with cultural pessimism and rising social anxiety. Samuel Foster is a Visiting Academic at the University of East Anglia. His first monograph, Yugoslavia in the British Imagination: Peace, War and Peasants before Tito (Bloomsbury, 2021), explo…
 
In her phenomenal new book God’s Property: Islam, Charity, and the Modern State (U California Press, 2021), Nada Moumtaz charts the historical continuities and disjunctures as well contemporary paradoxes shadowing the intellectual and sociological career of waqf or Islamic charity/endowment in modern Lebanon. Nimbly moving between layered textual a…
 
With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osb…
 
What is the purpose of education? Folks outside the field are likely to think of a relatively clear or concrete answer—learning, citizenship, preparation for life, which for the vast majority encompasses work and skills. Upon probing, however, most are likely to realize that these explanations are deceptively simple. Learning what, how, and accordi…
 
What is the purpose of education? Folks outside the field are likely to think of a relatively clear or concrete answer—learning, citizenship, preparation for life, which for the vast majority encompasses work and skills. Upon probing, however, most are likely to realize that these explanations are deceptively simple. Learning what, how, and accordi…
 
In her phenomenal new book God’s Property: Islam, Charity, and the Modern State (U California Press, 2021), Nada Moumtaz charts the historical continuities and disjunctures as well contemporary paradoxes shadowing the intellectual and sociological career of waqf or Islamic charity/endowment in modern Lebanon. Nimbly moving between layered textual a…
 
The Problems of Physics, Reconsidered is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Physics Nobel Laureate Tony Leggett. The basis of this conversation is Tony Leggett’s book The Problems of Physics and further explores the insightful plain-speaking itemization that he developed of the physics landscape according to four bas…
 
In a world that demands faith in progress and growth, Limbo (Fitzcarraldo, 2019) is a companion for the stuck, the isolated, delayed, stranded and those in the dark. Fusing memoir with a meditation on creative block and a cultural history of limbo, Dan Fox considers the role that fallow periods and states of inbetween play in art and life. Limbo is…
 
As algorithms become ever more significant to and embedded in our everyday lives, ever more accessible introductions to them are needed. While several excellent technical and critical treatments have emerged in recent years, i had not come across a book for the general public that would provide a deep sense for the intuitions and motivations behind…
 
The Tashkent-born Russian-American literary critic, editor, essayist, and journalist Vladislav Davidzon has been covering post-Soviet Ukraine for the past ten years, a tumultuous time for that country and the surrounding world. The 2014 “Revolution of Dignity” heralded a tremendous transformation of Ukrainian politics and society that has continued…
 
Erin Y. Huang’s Urban Horror: Neoliberal Post-Socialism and the Limits of Visibility (Duke UP, 2020) is an expansive and ambitious book that explores the affective territory of “neoliberal post-socialist China” as it manifests in contemporary Chinese (language) cinema. Pushing beyond the geographic boundaries of the PRC and the confines of art cine…
 
The 2020 census shows that in at least one moment in time, the number of incarcerated people was lower than 10 years ago. But how can we make decarceration more than a trend? How can we make it a destination? Today we're reading There Are Fewer People Behind Bars Now Than There Were 10 Years Ago. Will It Last? Learn more about our new prison divers…
 
It’s true that for the first time in 20 years, there is no US military presence in Afghanistan. But Sahar Khan suggests that the war is not really over. Throughout this episode they discuss what happened in Afghanistan over the last 2 decades and why the United States kept troops on the ground there longer than anticipated. See acast.com/privacy fo…
 
Computational models of urbanism—smart cities that use data-driven planning and algorithmic administration—promise to deliver new urban efficiencies and conveniences. Yet these models limit our understanding of what we can know about a city. A City Is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences (Princeton UP, 2021) reveals how cities encompass myriad…
 
Once a powerful figure who reversed the disintegration of China and steered the country to Allied victory in World War II, Chiang Kai-shek fled into exile following his 1949 defeat in the Chinese civil war. As attention pivoted to Mao Zedong’s communist experiment, Chiang was relegated to the dustbin of history. In Chiang Kai-shek’s Politics of Sha…
 
In Domestic Contradictions: Race and Gendered Citizenship from Reconstruction to Welfare Reform (Duke UP, 2021), Priya Kandaswamy analyzes how race, class, gender, and sexuality shaped welfare practices in the United States alongside the conflicting demands that this system imposed upon Black women. She turns to an often-neglected moment in welfare…
 
Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book…
 
Computational models of urbanism—smart cities that use data-driven planning and algorithmic administration—promise to deliver new urban efficiencies and conveniences. Yet these models limit our understanding of what we can know about a city. A City Is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences (Princeton UP, 2021) reveals how cities encompass myriad…
 
FASCISM...FRANCE. Two words/ideas that scholars have spent much time and energy debating in relationship to one another. Chris Millington's A History of Fascism in France: From the First World War to the National Front (Bloomsbury, 2019) is a work of synthesis that also draws on the author's own research for key examples and evidence to support its…
 
Over the past seventy years, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM, has evolved from a virtually unknown and little-used pamphlet to an imposing and comprehensive compendium of mental disorder. Its nearly 300 conditions have become the touchstones for the diagnoses that patients receive, students are taught, researchers …
 
Mark Baker is an American journalist and travel writer. In the 1980s, he lived in Vienna and reported on the former Eastern bloc for Business International and The Economist Group. In 1991, he moved to Prague, where he worked as an editor for The Prague Post and co-founded The Globe Bookstore & Coffeehouse. He’s written 30 travel guidebooks for pub…
 
In Domestic Contradictions: Race and Gendered Citizenship from Reconstruction to Welfare Reform (Duke UP, 2021), Priya Kandaswamy analyzes how race, class, gender, and sexuality shaped welfare practices in the United States alongside the conflicting demands that this system imposed upon Black women. She turns to an often-neglected moment in welfare…
 
Celeste Mohammed speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her story “Home,” which appears in The Common’s spring issue. In this conversation, Celeste talks about her novel-in-stories, Pleasantview, and why it was important to her to write a book that shows all the complexities and difficulties of island life, with characters who break out of t…
 
In 1937, Shaykh Ibrahim Niasse, travelling to Mecca to make his first hajj, encountered Egyptian scholars who couldn’t fathom that Niasse’s erudition was a product of his fully Senegalese education. For those learned Egyptians of the 1930s and, Kane argues, modern-day Europhone academics, Islamic erudition among Black Africans remains a major blind…
 
In his painstakingly researched and splendid new book Sculpting the Self: Islam, Selfhood, and Human Flourishing (U Michigan Press, 2021), Muhammad Faruque charts and examines the multiplicity of ways in which the self and its moral flourishing have been discussed, debated, and examined in the Muslim intellectual tradition. The remarkable aspect of…
 
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