show episodes
 
The Porty Podcast is a community project, highlighting events in and around Edinburgh's seaside - Portobello! It's a very active area with sailing, rowing and kayaking on the Forth, a vibrant artistic community and a strong sense of identity which makes it slightly separate from the other parts of Edinburgh. Image credit Nicola Dunlop
 
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a weekly, hour-long interview program featuring artists, historians, authors, curators and conservators. Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic Sebastian Smee called The MAN Podcast “one of the great archives of the art of our time.” When the US chapter of the International Association of Art Critics gave host Tyler Green one of its inaugural awards for criticism in 2014, it included a special citation for The MAN Podcast.
 
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show series
 
Episode No. 563 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Aleesa Pitchamarn Alexander and artist Katherine Bradford. Alexander is the curator of "The Faces of Ruth Asawa," a new permanent installation at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University featuring Asawa's Untitled (LC.012, Wall of Masks). Wall of Masks is made up of ceramic face …
 
Episode No. 562 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sarah Chasse and Karen Kramer, and artist Jason Garcia (Okuu Pin). Chasse and Kramer are the co-curators of a new installation of the Peabody Essex Museum's Native American and American collections titled "On This Ground: Being and Belonging in America." The installation joins two se…
 
Episode No. 561 features author Helen Langdon and curator Erin Garcia. Langdon is the author of "Salvator Rosa: Paint and Performance," a new biography of the Renaissance painter and actor. The book explains Rosa's thirst for fame, his philosophical pursuits and how they melded with his painting, his acting career, and the ways in which his desire …
 
Episode No. 560 features artist Kiyan Williams and historian Paul M. Farber. The Hammer Museum is presenting "Hammer Projects: Kiyan Williams", the artist's first solo museum presentation, through August 28. The show features Williams' 2022 installation Between Starshine and Clay, a work that features earth taken from sites that are familial or tha…
 
Hello, this is Eric LeMay, a host on New Books in Literature, a channel on the New Books Network. Today I interview Kathleen Rooney about her new collection of poems, Where Are the Snows (Texas Review Press, 2022). The book takes its title from the famous refrain of François Villon's 15th Century poem "Ballad of the Ladies of Times Past." Like that…
 
Episode No. 559 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Esteban Cabeza de Baca and Jess T. Dugan. The Momentary in Bentonville, Ark. is presenting "Esteban Cabeza de Baca: Let Earth Breathe" through September 25. Across the exhibition, Cabeza de Baca deconstructs the colonial European-American landscape tradition by re-considering painting…
 
Patti Smith arrived in New York City at the end of the Age of Aquarius in search of work and purpose. What she found—what she fostered—was a cultural revolution. Through her poetry, her songs, her unapologetic vocal power, and her very presence as a woman fronting a rock band, she kicked open a door that countless others walked through. No other mu…
 
Episode No. 558 features author Hugh Eakin and artist Jordan Weber. Eakin is the author of "Picasso's War: How Modern Art Came to America," which tells a story of how New York City slowly, eventually, came to embrace both European modernism and the art of Pablo Picasso. Eakin's history begins with John Quinn, a white-shoe attorney with a yen for pr…
 
Today’s guests are Dennis Austin Britton and Kimberly Anne Coles who have co-edited a special issue of Spenser Studies in 2021, on “Spenser and Race.” Dennis is Associate Professor of English at the University of British Columbia; his previous book Becoming Christian: Race, Reformation, and Early Modern English Romance, was published through Fordha…
 
Episode No. 557 features artist Meghann Riepenhoff and curator Michelle White. Meghann Riepenhoff is included in "Watershed," an exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art that considers the interconnected histories, present lives, and imagined futures of the Great Lakes region. "Watershed" features work by 15 artists, six of whom were …
 
Anna Liebmann is a basketweaver who lives and works in her studio by the sea. She started weaving in her late twenties and is now a member of the Scottish Basketmakers’ Circle. Hazel met her and recorded this episode while Anna wove, talking about growing willow, teaching in lockdown and what 'zone' you're in while weaving. You can find out more ab…
 
Episode No. 556 is a holiday clips episode featuring artist Maya Dunietz. The Bemis Center Contemporary Arts in Omaha is presenting "Maya Dunietz: Root of Two," a 13,000-square-foot exhibition that foregrounds the physicality of sound via a series of installations. The exhibition was curated by Rachel Adams and will remain on view through September…
 
Mark Kyungsoo Bias speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem “Adoption Day,” which appears in The Common’s new spring issue. Mark talks about the inspiration and process behind the poem, which looks at issues like memory, immigration, and racism in post-9/11 America, all through the lens of a family experience. Mark also discusses his …
 
Episode No. 555 features artist Robert Adams. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, is presenting "American Silence: The Photographs of Robert Adams" through October 2. The exhibition, a career survey, includes about 175 pictures Adams made between 1965 and 2015. It is accompanied by a catalogue published by the NGA and Aperture. Indiebound and …
 
Episode No. 554 features artists Andrea Bowers and Suzanne Lacy. The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles is presenting a retrospective of Bowers' work. The exhibition reveals how Bowers has combined her artistic practice with activism. Both focus on structural inequities, elevating and celebrating the work of activists trying to create a more just nation an…
 
This afternoon, the people of Portobello (and beyond) will be welcomed to Bellfield for the first Community Forum to hear about what’s going on at the Town Hall. It’s the first chance since 2019 that local people will be able to see the plans for the building and to discuss the plans for its possible future. Work on making the building suitable for…
 
Episode No. 553 features artist Hayv Kahraman and conservator and author Susan Lake. Hayv Kahraman is included in "Women Painting Women" at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The exhibition features 46 female artists who choose women as subject matter in their works. It was curated by Andrea Karnes and is on view through September 25. The exhibit…
 
A new bar/restaurant will very soon be opening on the High Street. Called Porty Vault, it will be moving into what used to be the Skylark. It’s a major expansion by Vault City Brewing which already is based in Portobello – its brewery is located in the A1 Industrial Estate, just off the Harry Lauder road. But the company is funding this in a slight…
 
Episode No. 552 is a summer clips episode featuring artist Marilyn Minter. Minter is included in "Women Painting Women," which is at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth through September 25. It features 46 female artists who choose women as subject matter in their works. It was curated by Andrea Karnes. This conversation was taped in 2015 on the oc…
 
Episode No. 551 is a holiday clips episode featuring artist Allison Janae Hamilton. Allison Janae Hamilton is included in “A Movement in Every Direction: Legacies of the Great Migration” at the Mississippi Museum of Art in Jackson. The exhibition, which was curated by Ryan N. Dennis and Jessica Bell Brown, features newly commissioned work from 12 B…
 
Walt Whitman knew a great deal about democracy that we don’t. Most of that knowledge is concentrated in one stunning poem, Song of Myself. In Song of Ourselves: Walt Whitman and the Fight for Democracy (Harvard UP, 2021), esteemed cultural and literary thinker Mark Edmundson offers a bold reading of the 1855 poem, included here in its entirety. He …
 
Episode No. 550 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore and curator Edith Devaney. Gilmore is the author of "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination," which was just published by the University of North Carolina Press. The book examines how Bearden's address of his native South -- he was born…
 
Since the original airing of this episode in June 2021, Roger Reeves' second book Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. was published by W.W. Norton, and the paperback edition of David Ferry's translation of The Aeneid was published by the University of Chicago Press. The underworld, that repository of the Shades of the Dead, gets a lot of traffic …
 
This intricate, yearning work from award-winning poet Alison Calder asks us to think about the way we perceive and the ways in which we seek to know ourselves and others. In Synaptic (University of Regina Press, 2022) each section explores key themes in science, neurology, and perception. The first, Connectomics, riffs on scientific language to wor…
 
Nearly 1.5m people in the UK have macular disease. Every day, some 300 more are diagnosed. At the moment, not enough is known about why the condition occurs and, as yet, there is no cure. It affects people of all ages though mostly affecting those over the age of 55. The Macular Society was set up to support people who suffer from this condition, m…
 
The collapse of the Soviet Union forced Russia to engage in a process of nation building. This involved a reassessment of the past, both historical and cultural, and how it should be remembered. The publication of previously barely known underground and émigré literary works presented an opportunity to reappraise "official" Soviet literature and re…
 
Drawing inspiration from the life of Harriet Tubman, Cynthia Parker-Ohene's poetic narratives follow a historical arc of consciousness of Black folks: mislaid in potters' fields and catalogued with other misbegotten souls, now unsettled as the unknown Black denominator. Who loved them? Who turned them away? Who dismembered their souls? In death, th…
 
Episode No. 549 features artists Aubrey Levinthal and Doron Langberg. Levinthal and Langberg are included in "A Place for Me: Figurative Painting Now" at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The exhibition, which was curated by Ruth Erickson, spotlights painters who are particularly interested in depicting what is near and dear to them, inclu…
 
The Porty Community Cargo Bike has arrived in town. It’s one of the many projects which come under the banner of Porty Community Energy – there will be more about those later. When she’s not producing episodes of The Porty podcast, Hazel Darwin-Clements works as Project Manager with the local community interest organisation, helping to turn interes…
 
In this episode, co-translators Suhyun J. Ahn and Archana Madhavan discuss their Korean-to-English translation of Glory Hole by Kim Hyun (Seagull Books, 2022). Released as part of The Pride List from Seagull Books, Glory Hole is a fantastical collection of queer poems that are uncomfortable, bodily, fluid-filled, and delightfully puzzling to read. …
 
Episode No. 548 features curators Ann Temkin and Stephanie Weissberg. Along with Dorthe Aagesen, Temkin is the co-curate of "Matisse: The Red Studio," an exhibition that investigates Matisse's making of his famed 1911 The Red Studio. The exhibition, which is at the Museum of Modern Art, New York through September 10, features each of the surviving …
 
Rajiv Mohabir is a dazzling poet of linguistics crossovers, who works in English, Bhojpuri, Hindi and more. He is as prolific as he is polyglot (three books in 2021!) and has undertaken a remarkable array of projects includes the prizewinning resurrection of a forgotten century-old memoir about mass involuntary migration. He joined John and first-t…
 
In Czesław Miłosz’s Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cambridge professor Stanley Bill offers a profoundly original, fine-grained, and rich interpretation of the poetic œuvre of Nobel laureate Czesław Miłosz. The book presents Miłosz’s poetic philosophy of the body as an original defense of religi…
 
The first poem in Sean Singers’ new collection of poetry, Today in the Taxi, published by Tupelo Press, begins with, “Today in the taxi, I brought a man from midtown to someplace in Astoria near the airport.” From that ordinary beginning, the poems explore the many features of New York City--its people, its streets, its highways, and its neighborho…
 
Episode No. 547 features artists Leslie Hewitt and Cornell Watson. Hewitt is included in "A Movement in Every Direction: Legacies of the Great Migration" at the Mississippi Museum of Art in Jackson. The exhibition, which was curated by Ryan N. Dennis and Jessica Bell Brown, features newly commissioned work from 12 Black artists that addresses the G…
 
This episode is unusual in that it is simply a matter of record. On Tuesday the 26th of April '22, Portobello Community Council invited all of the candidates to take part in an online hustings. All of the questions had been submitted in advance by members of the Portobello and Craigmillar ward. Six the candidates accepted the invitation. They were:…
 
Hazel has made a documentary capturing her personal perspective on the early months of setting up the Porty Community Fridge. She reflects on creating a project that mustn't rely on just one individual to keep it going. The Porty Community Fridge is open every Saturday from 10.30-11.30 at the Baptist Church on the High Street. They are a subgroup o…
 
Romeo Oriogun speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem “The Sea Dreams of Us,” which appears in The Common’s fall issue. In this conversation, Romeo talks about his life as a poet in exile from Nigeria, and how that experience of exile appears in his poetry. He also discusses his writing process, the themes he often returns to in his …
 
Episode No. 546 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Natalie Dupêcher and Laura de Becker. Along with Anne Umland and Nina Zimmer, Dupêcher is the co-curator of "Meret Oppenheim: My Exhibition," a retrospective that spans the Swiss artists' 1930s work in Paris, her engagements with surrealism, and her broad post-war synthesis of nouvea…
 
Farzana Doctor is a Toronto-based author, activist and a psychotherapist. She has written four critically acclaimed novels. Her latest, Seven, which Ms. Magazine described as “fully feminist and ambitiously bold”, was chosen for multiple 2020 Best Book lists and shortlisted for the Trillium and Evergreen Awards. Her poetry collection, You Still Loo…
 
This episode is part of a series of recordings I do with artists and scholars from Israel and Palestine. To allow people from the conflict to make their voices heard. Today I interview Sigal Naor Perelman, who is a literary scholar, editor, founder, and co-director of the Derech Ruach organization to promote the humanities in Israel. Sigal has publ…
 
Portobello has a vibrant arts scene. From painting to photography, silverware to ceramics, design to dance, music, theatre and film, there is so much going on. For many budding artists however, the challenge is not in the creation but finding the audience. The annual Art Walk is a magical experience - but what of the rest of the year? Getting into …
 
In A Vertical Art: On Poetry (Princeton UP, 2022), acclaimed poet Simon Armitage takes a refreshingly common-sense approach to an art form that can easily lend itself to grand statements and hollow gestures. Questioning both the facile and obscure ends of the poetry spectrum, he offers sparkling new insights about poetry and an array of favorite po…
 
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