show episodes
 
SERious EPI is a podcast hosted by Hailey Banack and Matt Fox where leading epidemiology researchers are interviewed on cutting edge and novel methods. Interviews focus on why these methods are so important, what problems they solve, and how they are currently being used.
 
Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
How can we make our families, communities, and our world a little bit better during the COVID-19 crisis, and beyond? That’s the question we’re asking on Better Off, a new podcast from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In each episode of Better Off, host Anna Fisher-Pinkert will introduce you to the people who are hunting down solutions to current public health challenges, and innovating to solve public health problems that we haven’t even imagined yet.
 
Throughout my training and practice as a physician I have come to one very disappointing conclusion: Western medicine isn’t helping people lead better lives. Now that I’ve realized this, I’ve become obsessed with understanding what makes us healthy or ill. I want to live the best life I can and I want to be able to share this knowledge with others so that they can do the same. This podcast is the result of my relentless search to understand the roots of chronic disease. If you want to know h ...
 
This podcast might not actually kill you, but it covers so many things that can. Each episode tackles a different disease, from its history, to its biology, and finally, how scared you need to be. Ecologists and epidemiologists Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke make infectious diseases acceptable fodder for dinner party conversation and provide the perfect cocktail recipe to match
 
The Model Health Show is a fun, entertaining, and enlightening look at health and fitness. No subject is off limits here! World-renown author and nutritionist Shawn Stevenson breaks down complex health issues and makes them easy to understand and overcome. Whether it's weight loss, chronic fatigue, heart disease, diet, exercise, sex, hormones, sleep problems, or countless other health topics, the insights you get here will help you transform your health and live your best life ever.
 
CTSI Discovery Radio is a unique facet of the Clinical & Translation Science Institute (CTSI) of Southeast Wisconsin. Each 30-minute monthly show informs and educates listeners about translational research relative to current health topics, clinical studies and advancements in biomedical research leading to better outcomes. CTSI Discovery Radio is hosted and produced by award-winning veteran radio personality Bryan Belmer. Visit the CTSI website at https://ctsi.mcw.edu
 
If you want to learn how data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning are being used to change our world for the better, you’ve subscribed to the right podcast. We talk to entrepreneurs and experts about their experiences employing new technology—their approach, their successes, their failures, and the outcomes of their work. We make these difficult concepts accessible to a wide audience.
 
In CoronaNomics, we talk to the world’s top economic thinkers about how to tackle the economic impact of coronavirus. Presented by Ben Chu (Economics Editor of The Independent) with Lizzy Burden (Economics Reporter at the Daily Telegraph). An Econ Films production.
 
The Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. (CBIC) is a voluntary autonomous multidisciplinary board that provides direction for and administers the certification process for professionals in infection control and applied epidemiology. The mission of CBIC is to provide pathways to assess and maintain infection prevention competency.
 
Nature Boy is a general science show hosted by four PhD graduate students studying plant biology at UC Riverside. Join Michael, Marschal, Jon, and Jess the first Sunday of each month as research from varied fields is discussed, made digestible, and often criticized. An irreverent look at the often over revered field of scientific research.
 
The Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health is a truly international journal that encompasses all aspects of epidemiology and public health. It publishes original research, opinions and materials concerned with the study and improvement of communities worldwide.* The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care ...
 
The Royal Statistical Society (RSS) is one of the world's most distinguished and renowned statistical societies. It is a learned society for statistics, a professional body for statisticians and a charity which promotes statistics, data and evidence for the public good. It was founded in 1834 as the Statistical Society of London and became the Royal Statistical Society by Royal Charter in 1887. Today the Society has more than 10,000 members around the world, of whom many are professionally q ...
 
SCALE HBV is an audio podcast program developed from a live syposium conducted this year on how to better screen, counsel and link patients with HBV to care. SCALE HBV is presented by the Tufts University School of Medicine. After listening to each podcast please go to www.scalehbv.org to claim credit. This program is supported by an independent grant from Gilead Sciences Medical Affairs
 
We would like to introduce 'Stories in Public Health', a podcast for new and aspiring public health professionals. Join as we travel around Sydney interviewing the people in public health that we most look up to! Download our podcast and: • Be inspired by public health professionals who are leaders in their fields • Learn about how they got to where they are, and what motivates them to work in public health. • Stay up-to-date with the latest public health practice from the real world and hav ...
 
RED MED is a platform for healthcare professionals (HCPs) working in or aspiring to join Rescue, Expedition & Disaster Response teams., along with HCPs working in the wilderness, humanitarian or tactical spheres. On this podcast we share information, ideas and experiences, course information and connect likeminded members of the RED MED community Hosted by: Chris Gibson FAWM (Flight Paramedic, Director of SOS Medical Services, Author of Rescue, Expedition & Disaster Medicine).
 
For just a few short weeks a year, when the veil is thin and the moon is full, it is said that the disembodied souls of two podcasters can be heard. Arising from their graves to haunt the airwaves, dissecting the most beloved and despised Halloween specials of yore. Make haste dear listeners, for as the cold winds of winter blow away the mystical secrets of the season, so too must our hosts return to their mortal rest. That is, until next year...
 
What happens when a global pandemic and unprecedented socioeconomic injustice meets real people? In this new series brought to you by Contakt World -- hosts Justin Beck, Catherine Delcin, and Deepti Pahwa talk with top researchers and trusted experts to tackle issues that matter to people and the communities globally. Issues like public health, vaccines, social and racial justice, health equity, equality, fragility, fear-mongering, insecurity, community-based care and a whole lot more than j ...
 
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show series
 
By nearly any metric, Black and brown Americans are disproportionately policed, arrested, convicted, and incarcerated compared to white Americans. One in 3 Black boys born in America in 2001 can expect to go to prison in their lifetime. Furthermore, Black Americans are more likely to be physically injured and killed at the hands of the police—a rea…
 
You’re about to meet Imani Ransby, with the United South and Eastern Tribes, Tribal Epidemiology Center. The United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) is just one of 12 partner Tribal Epidemiology Centers. Imani started working at USET in January 2020 as a Staff Epidemiologist in the Tribal Health and Program Support department. On this episode, you’l…
 
Dr. Anthony Cannella, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the USF Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, reviews Non-tuberculosis Mycobacteria, with a focus on Mycobacterium abscessus spp. Dr. Cannella begins his presentation by reviewing the microbiology and epidemiology of M. abscessus and their spectrum of disease. He then tr…
 
Typhoid fever is a food- and water-borne infectious disease that was insidious and omnipresent in Victorian Britain. It was one of the most prolific diseases of the Industrial Revolution. There was a palpable public anxiety about the disease in the Victorian era, no doubt fueled by media coverage of major outbreaks across the nation, but also becau…
 
In 1935, the writer Baburao Patel writes the following about Bombay’s film industry: “In India, with financing conditions still precarious, the professional film distributor thrives. . . . He comes with a fortune made in share and cotton gambling, advances money to the producer at a killing rate of interest plus a big slice of royalty and recovers …
 
Lori Cox Han and Caroline Heldman, both scholars of gender and politics as well as scholars of the American Presidency, have assembled a wide array of essays[*] to revisit the question about whether “we” are ready for the first female president of the United States, and what the path might look like to arrive at that glass-ceiling shattering event.…
 
Would your dog eat you if you died? What are face mites? Why do clowns creep us out? In this illuminating collection of grisly true science stories, journalist Erika Engelhaupt, the writer of National Geographic’s highly acclaimed Gory Details blog, shares the answers to these questions and many more. Gory Details: Adventures from the Dark Side of …
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
Today I talked to Candacy Taylor about her book Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America (Abrams Press, 2020). Taylor is an award-winning author, photographer and cultural documentarian. She’s been a fellow at Harvard University under the direction of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and her projects have been funded by org…
 
Maybe the People Would Be the Times (Verse Chorus Press, 2020) could be described as a memoir in essay form. Collecting pieces from the past two decades, this book covers Luc Sante's childhood as an immigrant from Belgium, his engagement with the downtown arts scene that gave rise to punk, and the eventual downfall of a version of New York that may…
 
As a Thai-Australian woman artist, Phaptawan Suwannakudt has long battled prejudice and discrimination relating to her gender. This disappointment with society’s dictates features at the heart of Phaptawan’s artistic practice. Spanning more than four decades, Phaptawan’s rich body of work includes paintings, sculptures and installations, informed b…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
In 1935, the writer Baburao Patel writes the following about Bombay’s film industry: “In India, with financing conditions still precarious, the professional film distributor thrives. . . . He comes with a fortune made in share and cotton gambling, advances money to the producer at a killing rate of interest plus a big slice of royalty and recovers …
 
Dispute over land and kingdom may lie at the heart of this story of war between cousins the Pandavas and the Kouravas but the Mahabharata is about conflicts of dharma. These conflicts are immense and various, singular and commonplace. Throughout the epic, characters face them with no clear indications of what is right and what is wrong; there are n…
 
Today I talked to Candacy Taylor about her book Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America (Abrams Press, 2020). Taylor is an award-winning author, photographer and cultural documentarian. She’s been a fellow at Harvard University under the direction of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and her projects have been funded by org…
 
Would your dog eat you if you died? What are face mites? Why do clowns creep us out? In this illuminating collection of grisly true science stories, journalist Erika Engelhaupt, the writer of National Geographic’s highly acclaimed Gory Details blog, shares the answers to these questions and many more. Gory Details: Adventures from the Dark Side of …
 
Kaitland Byrd’s new book Real Southern Barbecue: Constructing Authenticity in Southern Food Culture (Lexington Press, 2019) examines an archive of oral histories collected by the Southern Foodways Alliance featuring the voices of barbecue pit masters and restaurant owners from the South. Byrd argues that barbecue as a cultural product has a unique …
 
Humans have found many ways to divide and stratify—by skin color, ancestry, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, health status, body type or size, and so on. The list is so long that it’s hard to imagine it getting longer, and yet debut author Chris Panatier has found a way. In The Phlebotomist (Angry Robot, 2020)t, society is di…
 
This Sunday Community Access presents a special Get the Facts on the Vax program on all CT iHeartRadio stations. We'll tackle questions, comments, and concerns about getting vaccinated for covid-19: •The expanded roll-out of age groups •Racial disparities and trepidation of getting vaccinated •Concern of meeting the need for vaccines •Educators get…
 
We stand at an uncertain moment in the pandemic. Vaccinations are plugging along. Infections and deaths are plummeting from their stratospheric winter peaks. But at the same time, new, more contagious viral variants have come to our shores. Minnesota’s best-known epidemiologist told MPR News last week that he fears the variants will send case numbe…
 
The technology that is helping us combat COVID-19 is also poised to help us tackle tough infectious and non-infectious diseases. Immunologist Sarah Fortune explains how these vaccines work, and how the mRNA platform could transform the prevention and treatment of deadly diseases. In this episode of "Better Off," Harvard Chan School immunologist Sar…
 
Based on a viral article, the gripping medical mystery story of Ron Davis, a world-class Stanford geneticist who has put his career on the line to find the cure for chronic fatigue syndrome, the disease killing his son. For the past six years, Whitney Dafoe has been confined to a bedroom in the back of his parents' home, unable to walk, to eat, to …
 
Chelsea Szendi Schieder’s Co-Ed Revolution: The Female Student in the Japanese New Left and Naoko Koda’s The United States and the Japanese Student Movement, 1948-1973: Managing a Free World provide new insights into the postwar Japanese student movement. Koda, a scholar of diplomatic history and international relations, situates student activism w…
 
Suyoung Son’s book Writing for Print: Publishing and the Making of Textual Authority in Late Imperial China (Harvard UP, 2018) examines the widespread practice of self-publishing by writers in late imperial China, focusing on the relationships between manuscript tradition and print convention, peer patronage and popular fame, and gift exchange and …
 
Listen to this interview of Shyam Sharma, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at Stony Brook University. We talk about how mutually appreciative attitudes advance Writing in the Disciplines, about how other languages matter to writing in English, and about how US Presidents have changed the wa…
 
Chelsea Szendi Schieder’s Co-Ed Revolution: The Female Student in the Japanese New Left and Naoko Koda’s The United States and the Japanese Student Movement, 1948-1973: Managing a Free World provide new insights into the postwar Japanese student movement. Koda, a scholar of diplomatic history and international relations, situates student activism w…
 
Founded in 1935 by a young publisher disillusioned with the class prejudices of the interwar publishing trade, Penguin Books set out to make good books available to all. The 'Penguin Specials', a series of current affairs books authored by leading intellectuals and politicians, embodied its democratising mission. Published over fifty years and ofte…
 
With over 100 million followers, Buddhism in the People's Republic of China now fosters the largest community in the world of individuals who self-identify as Buddhists. Although Buddhism was harshly persecuted during the Cultural Revolution under the leadership of Mao Zedong, Buddhist communities around the country were able to revive their tradit…
 
Founded in 1935 by a young publisher disillusioned with the class prejudices of the interwar publishing trade, Penguin Books set out to make good books available to all. The 'Penguin Specials', a series of current affairs books authored by leading intellectuals and politicians, embodied its democratising mission. Published over fifty years and ofte…
 
Based on a viral article, the gripping medical mystery story of Ron Davis, a world-class Stanford geneticist who has put his career on the line to find the cure for chronic fatigue syndrome, the disease killing his son. For the past six years, Whitney Dafoe has been confined to a bedroom in the back of his parents' home, unable to walk, to eat, to …
 
The remarkable life of history's first foreign-born samurai and his astonishing journey from Northern Africa to the heights of Japanese society. When Yasuke arrived in Japan in the late 1500s, he had already traveled much of the known world. Kidnapped as a child, and trained into a boy soldier in India, he had ended up an indentured servant and bod…
 
When John Foster Dulles died in 1959, he was given the largest American state funeral since Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s in 1945. President Eisenhower called Dulles—his longtime secretary of state—“one of the truly great men of our time,” and a few years later the new commercial airport outside Washington, DC, was christened the Dulles International…
 
With over 100 million followers, Buddhism in the People's Republic of China now fosters the largest community in the world of individuals who self-identify as Buddhists. Although Buddhism was harshly persecuted during the Cultural Revolution under the leadership of Mao Zedong, Buddhist communities around the country were able to revive their tradit…
 
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