Best Etymology podcasts we could find (Updated May 2019)
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Lexicon Valley
Monthly+
 
Lexicon Valley is a show about language, from pet peeves, syntax, and etymology to neurolinguistics and the death of languages. Hosted by linguist John McWhorter.
 
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Lexitecture
Monthly+
 
A Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) talking about the words in the English language that fascinate them most at the moment, looking at their histories and origins and trying to piece together just how they got to where they are today. This is a podcast for anyone interested in etymology (the study of words and their origins/history). If you've ever found yourself happier after discovering some bizarre bit of trivia about a word that you hadn't even given a second thought to (such as how the w ...
 
Word Journeys is a podcast about etymology and the surprising stories behind the origins of English words. English is constantly evolving and the meanings of words are always shifting. In each episode, we take words united by a common theme and explore how they made their way into English and the historical circumstances which shaped their definitions. For more information or to contact us, visit www.wordjourneyspodcast.com. If you would like to contribute to the show and want to see the per ...
 
I am a dream activist, practitioner and teacher. I am the host of An Etymology of Dreaming - a podcast on digging into the roots of the language of dreams.
 
Have you ever wondered why it rains "cats and dogs" or why someone you like just told you to go "break a leg?" Check in weekly with your hosts Scott and Steve as they reveal the fascinating and sometimes bizarre origins of the words and phrases we use every day.
 
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The Endless Knot
Monthly
 
Aven & Mark discuss etymology, history, literature, language, and cocktails, and the sometimes surprising connections between them all.
 
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TURN OF PHRASES
Weekly
 
I explore the origins and histories of idioms, metaphors, old wives tales, superstitions, and more. Come along with me as I turn phrases inside out. #turningphrases #toppers #lendmeyourears #etymology
 
A fun weekly radio show about language seen through culture, history, and family. Co-hosts Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett talk with callers who have questions and stories about linguistics, old sayings, word histories, etymology, regional dialects, slang, new words, word play, word games, grammar, family expressions, books, literature, writing, and more. Your language questions: https://waywordradio.org/contact or words@waywordradio.org. Call toll-free *any* time in the U.S. and Canada at ...
 
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The Endless Knot
Monthly
 
Aven & Mark discuss etymology, history, literature, language, and cocktails, and the sometimes surprising connections between them all.
 
In this etymology dedicated podcast, Hosts Jordan Pease and Becky Hanley satirically discover the origin of overused phrases like "Lazy Susan" and "It ain't over till the fat lady sings."
 
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Words for Granted
Monthly
 
Words for Granted is a podcast that looks at how words change over time. Host Ray Belli uses language--more specifically, individual words--as a way of making connections among history, culture, religion, and society.
 
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Why Is That Podcast
Monthly+
 
The Why Is That Podcast is a podcast that explores the origins of today's common occurrences from word etymology to holiday traditions and everywhere in between.
 
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Words for Granted
Monthly
 
Words for Granted is a podcast that looks at how words change over time. Host Ray Belli uses language--more specifically, individual words--as a way of making connections among history, culture, religion, and society.
 
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Selfish Podcast
Monthly+
 
SELFish is an exploration of the self from the point of view of the host, Justin, aka Distractible Monk. This podcast will delve into topics ranging from spiritual exploration to personal growth, psychedelics to psychology, philosophy to etymology, and a bit of everything in between. Justin will discuss lectures of speakers (whether or not he agrees with them) such as Alan Watts, Terence McKenna, Marshall Mcluen, Timothy Leary, and contemporaries like Sam Harris, Vishen Lakhiani, etc.
 
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Word of the Day
Daily
 
The huge Amazon Alexa hit Word of the Day is now available as a podcast!Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.
 
This is the Torah Observant "Shomer Mitzvot" series. In Judaism, safeguarding and keeping the Torah is central to performing the will of HaShem. Indeed, as properly understood from HaShem’s point of view, the whole of Torah was given to bring its followers to the "goal" of acquiring the kind of faith in HaShem that leads to placing one’s trusting faithfulness in the One and only Son of HaShem, Yeshua HaMashiach. To this end, the Torah has prophesied about him since as early as the book of Ge ...
 
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Word for Word
Monthly
 
Australian English has many fascinating stories, interesting etymologies, and wonderfully weird slang. The language is constantly evolving as the world around us changes; new words are created, meanings change, and other things get left behind. In Word for Word, we explore the surprising histories behind everyday words and phrases, go behind-the-scenes with the dictionary editors, and meet some of Australia's most interesting word-lovers, from Scrabble champions to hip-hop artists. Join us a ...
 
An etymology enthusiast and linguistics/language nerd. If you like what you hear, support me here at www.patreon.com/etymology?ty=h
 
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Ologies
Weekly
 
Volcanoes. Trees. Drunk butterflies. Mars missions. Slug sex. Death. Beauty standards. Anxiety busters. Beer science. Bee drama. Take away a pocket full of science knowledge and charming, bizarre stories about what fuels these professional -ologists' obsessions. Humorist and science correspondent Alie Ward asks smart people stupid questions and the answers might change your life.
 
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On Words
Daily+
 
John Ciardi first appeared on NPR in the very early days -- he contributed reviews, arts news and etymologies. Starting in 1979, he had a regular segment on Morning Edition, wishing the listeners "Good words to you." This column is a revival of that series on the etymology of words and phrases.
 
“Call me Ishmael” is one of the most famous opening lines in American literature. With these words, opens one of the strangest and most gripping stories ever written about the sea and sea-faring. Moby Dick by Herman Melville is today considered one of the greatest novels written in America but paradoxically, it was a miserable failure when it first made its debut in 1851. Entitled Moby Dick or The Whale the book finally got its due after the author's death and is now regarded as a classic po ...
 
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Reformed Forum
Rare
 
Reformed Theological Resources
 
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Man of Starch Podcast
Monthly+
 
Man of Starch podcast featuring Bryan Starchman. Your source for the polite musings of a real life High School English teacher and drama coach from beautiful Mariposa, California. Podsafe music, a round up of the top news stories in Education and how they will affect you, a review of what Man of Starch has been reading, watching, and listening to, highlights from this week in history, a calendar of events for all those Central Valley Kids complaining that there is Nothing To Do In This Town, ...
 
This is the Torah Observant "Shomer Mitzvot" series. In Judaism, safeguarding and keeping the Torah is central to performing the will of HaShem. Indeed, as properly understood from HaShem’s point of view, the whole of Torah was given to bring its followers to the "goal" of acquiring the kind of faith in HaShem that leads to placing one’s trusting faithfulness in the One and only Son of HaShem, Yeshua HaMashiach. To this end, the Torah has prophesied about him since as early as the book of Ge ...
 
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Insect Minute
Monthly
 
Insect Minute is a collaboration between the N.C. State Insect Museum and WKNC 88.1 FM to highlight interesting aspects in the field of etymology.
 
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FMB
Monthly+
 
Polite girls with potty mouths.
 
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But Daddy Why
Rare
 
Each week Pat and Eric answer a couple questions so you don't get stumped when your kid says "But Daddy Why..."
 
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Let's Talk Talk
Monthly+
 
Anything language goes! Let’s Talk Talk is a Pop-linguistics based discussion podcast where the goal is easy consumption of language topics in a fun way for folks who aren’t language scientists.
 
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Reformed Forum
Rare
 
Reformed Theological Resources
 
The etymology of the word “soul” traces back to mean, “coming from or belonging to the sacred”. The root of the word “sophia” translates best to the word “wisdom” in english (referring to Sophacles, generally considered the father of Wisdom in most Western Civilations.) Soulosophy is a wisdom about that which comes from or goes towards “The Sacred” (whatever that may mean to each invidivual). Download. Uplift. ™️ Hosted by, Poet Ali, best known for his international lectures, his Ted Talks, ...
 
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Capilano Radio
Monthly
 
 
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Fandom Post Radio
Monthly+
 
Join the staff writers and reviewers of Fandom Post as we as discuss any and everything that the world of manga and anime has to offer!
 
A Terrible Thing in the Form of a Literary Torpedo which is Launched for HILARIOUS PURPOSES ONLY Inaccurate in Every Particular Containing Copious Etymological Derivations and Other Useless Things by Noah Lott (an ex-relative of Noah Webster)(Summary from book's cover page)
 
The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads. Most of the Upanishads were kept secret for centuries, only passed on to others orally in the form of Shloka (a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh ...
 
Nonconsequential conversations, with love
 
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Look It Up
Rare
 
If you've ever wondered whether animals could be ambidextrous, or what happens when you put a gun in a refrigerator, or what Presidents of the United States do after their terms end, this podcast will relieve you of the effort of having to look it up yourself. Look It Up is a podcast for the indiscriminately curious. Establish contact by email at thelookituppodcast@gmail.com.
 
Curious Podcast Show finds out the story behind what you are curious about. Staci Matthews gets the answers to questions that most of us are too embarrassed, shy or proud to ask. What are you curious about?
 
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More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
In this episode, we explore the magic of the figures who come in our dreams. Who are they? Why are they there? Why do people I know (like my ex) come in my dreams?By Sue Scavo.
 
Opprobrium is a noun that means public disgrace. Our word of the day comes directly from Latin. It combines the prefix ‘O-B,’ meaning ‘against’ with probrum (PRO broom) which means ‘disgraceful act.’ Public officials who get caught taking bribes get no symphony from me. I say let them spend the rest of their careers in opprobrium. Send in a voi ...…
 
Nettlesome is an adjective that means irritable or difficult. A plant called the nettle has jagged leaves covered with stinging hairs. And this irritable plant naturally gave birth to our word of the day which means irritable. The old meaning of nettlesome was ‘to beat or sting someone with nettles,’ but more recently the word is used in a figu ...…
 
We spoke to Carly Silver, an editor and a writer on ancient history and horse racing, about how she connects the past to contemporary issues, the intriguing stories in curse tablets in Roman Britain, murder mysteries set in the ancient world, romance novels, breeding programs for American Thoroughbreds, and more! Carly’s website Carly’s article ...…
 
We spoke to Carly Silver, an editor and a writer on ancient history and horse racing, about how she connects the past to contemporary issues, the intriguing stories in curse tablets in Roman Britain, murder mysteries set in the ancient world, romance novels, breeding programs for American Thoroughbreds, and more! Carly’s website Carly’s article ...…
 
Nascent is an adjective that means just coming into existence. In Latin, the word Nasci (NAAH shee) means to be born. This, of course, was the birthplace of our word of the day. In chemistry the word nascent means ‘freshly generated.’ But in everyday use, it usually refers to something new that has signs of potential. Years ago our company inve ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Fecund is an adjective that means highly fertile. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word for fertile, fecudus (fee KOON doos). Fecund may be used in a medical sense to refer to a pregnant woman, in a botanical sense, to refer to a fecund garden, or, in a figurative sense, as in: Kelly’s fecund mind ever ceases to astonish me. We never kn ...…
 
Announcement: BILL NYE HAS A PODCAST. And Alie's his first guest. Bill Nye’s on a mission to change the world, one phone call at a time and yer ol’ Dadward VonPodcast is first in the chair helping field questions. Yes she is freaking out about this and yes you should listen. In “Science Rules!," he tackles the curliest questions on just about a ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Labile is an adjective that means easily altered or unstable. Labile originates from the Latin word labi (LAH bee) which means ‘fall’ or ‘slip.’ This is why in chemistry our word of the day is often used to mean ‘easily broken down’ or ‘displaced.’ In everyday use, labile may refer to a person’s health or their emotions, as in: It’s been a roug ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
The letter R has a habit of intruding on spoken English. How come? Join Slate Plus! Members get bonus segments, exclusive member-only podcasts, and more. Sign up for a free trial today at www.slate.com/podcastsplus. Twitter: @lexiconvalley Facebook: facebook.com/LexiconValley Email: lexiconvalley@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visi ...…
 
Accretion a noun that means the process of gradual growth. The Latin word for grow is accidere (ah CHEE dare ay), which, over time gradually grew into our word of the day. Accretion is often used to describe a natural process of growth that you may see in a lawn or a body of water. But it may also be used to describe something like a city’s gro ...…
 
Mushrooms! Psilocybin! Humungous fungus! Black mold! Foraging! The incredibly charming and warm Dr. Tom Volk, world-renown mushroom expert, welcomes Alie into his office to dive deep into the underground world of fungal enthusiasts and touch on pathogens and medicinal therapies. Dr. Volk himself is a heart transplant patient, and shares how his ...…
 
In this episode, the guys discuss the classic TV and movie trope of "Slobs vs. Snobs," but first spend some time talking about how to describe the glory of David Coverdale and Whitesnake to a millennial from the "Goldfish Generation." Listen in to the odd-couple of podcasting as Steve shames Scott for eating "off-brand" pop-tarts over ten years ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
To read this answer on eBible.com, follow this link: https://ebible.com/answers/22757?ori=492502By Torah Teacher Ariel ben-Lyman HaNaviy.
 
How do actors bring Shakespeare's lines to life so that modern audiences immediately understand the text? One way is to emphasize the names of people and places at certain points. That technique is called billboarding. And: Anyone for an alphabet game? A pangram is a sentence that uses EVERY letter of the alphabet at least once. There's the one ...…
 
How do actors bring Shakespeare's lines to life so that modern audiences immediately understand the text? One way is to emphasize the names of people and places at certain points. That technique is called billboarding. And: Anyone for an alphabet game? A pangram is a sentence that uses EVERY letter of the alphabet at least once. There's the one ...…
 
Salutations Toppers, and thank you for lending me your ears! Episode 99 topics: That’s the way the cookie crumbles; Hand in the cookie jar; Cookie cutter; Smart/tough/sharp cookie You can check out my website, turnofphrases.com to send topic suggestions, find links to my social media, see the attributions for the show music, get information on ...…
 
Hibernal is an adjective that means pertaining to winter. The Latin word for winter is hibernum (HE burn um) which, over time, has evolved into words like hibernate and our word of the day hibernal, which refers to anything related to winter. As I kid I loved winter. My favorite things included such hibernal activities as skiing, sledding and m ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Librate is an adjective that means to poise or remained balanced. The Latin word for poise or balance is libramen (lee BRAHM en) where our word of the day comes from. It may be used in a scientific sense to refer, for example, to molecule holding in place by oscillating. Or it may be used in a more every day sense to simply mean ‘balance.’ It’s ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Vivify is a verb that means to enliven or bring to life. Vivus (VEE voos) the Latin word for life has, appropriately, given life to many common words in English. There’s vivid, vital, vitamin, vivacious and, of course, our word of the day, vivify. It’s usually applied metaphorically to refer to something made to seem alive. Mrs. Brailey was suc ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Pawky is an adjective that means showing a sardonic wit. The word pawk comes from Scottish and Northern English and refers to a trick. A pawky person could be considered snide or sardonic. Those pawkly little barbs of yours may get you laughs in the classroom. But they could also get you sent to the principal’s office. Send in a voice message:h ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Rebarbative is an adjective that means causing annoyance or irritation. The Latin word for beard is barba (BAR buh) which may seem like an odd origin for a word that means ‘causing annoyance or irritation,’ until you consider the journey that our word of the day has taken over the years. Rebarbative is derived from the phrase ‘standing beard to ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Betide is a verb that means to take place. Our word of the day comes from Middle English and although its meaning — ‘to happen’ or ‘take place’ — is fairly simple, it’s probably best used in a context that suits its old school origin. The Duke was wary of the upcoming battle. With the fate of his soldiers unclear, he wasn’t sure what would beti ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
Toaaaaads! Friend or foe? Dive into a toad hollow with bufologist and charming human Priya Nanjappa, who is a wealth of knowledge and a font of affection for toads. Which toads are the biggest, the most poisonous, the history of the cane toad, toad licking, orgies with pythons, mating calls, evolution, wart film flam, witch myths , toad abodes ...…
 
Ambrosial is an adjective that means fragrant or pleasant taste. Our word of the day comes from Greek mythology, where it meant ‘worthy of the gods.’ But it’s just fine to use ambrosial in a more mundane way, such as: the ambrosial scent of my new workplace was a lovely surprise. After all those years of working in sanitation disposal, I wasn’t ...…
 
This episode starts with Scott's revelation that he hasn't seen any of the Avengers movies and Steve taking a hard stance on not revealing his preferred theater seats, before Scott turns negative and starts discussing two of his most hated phrases. Listen now to hear the roots of the awful phrases, "Cool Beans" and "Awesome Sauce," and find out ...…
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
In this episode, Ryan is all all you get, mulling over the connection (?) between vice presidents, advice and moral blameworthiness with "vicious". Lexitecture is a podcast about words. In each (normal) episode, a Canadian (Ryan) and a Scot (Amy) each present their current favourite word and talk about its origins, current use, and try to puzzl ...…
 
Salutations Toppers, and thank you for lending me your ears! Episode 98 topics: Etymology of theatre; All the world’s a stage; To be in the limelight You can check out my website, turnofphrases.com to send topic suggestions, find links to my social media, see the attributions for the show music, get information on how to support the podcast, an ...…
 
Amorist is a noun that means someone who writes about love. Speakers of Spanish and Italian may be familiar with the words amor (ah MORE) and amore (ah MORE ay) that mean ‘love.’ They both have their roots in the Latin word amor (ah MORE). By adding the suffix “I-S-T’ we get a word that refers to someone who specializes in ‘love.’ This may refe ...…
 
Restaurant jargon, military slang, and modern Greek turns of phrase. Some restaurants now advertise that they sell "clean" sandwiches. But that doesn't mean they're condiment-free or the lettuce got an extra rinse. In the food industry, the word "clean" is taking on a whole new meaning. Plus, a Marine veteran wonders about a phrase he heard oft ...…
 
Restaurant jargon, military slang, and modern Greek turns of phrase. Some restaurants now advertise that they sell "clean" sandwiches. But that doesn't mean they're condiment-free or the lettuce got an extra rinse. In the food industry, the word "clean" is taking on a whole new meaning. Plus, a Marine veteran wonders about a phrase he heard oft ...…
 
Restaurant jargon, military slang, and modern Greek turns of phrase. Some restaurants now advertise that they sell "clean" sandwiches. But that doesn't mean they're condiment-free or the lettuce got an extra rinse. In the food industry, the word "clean" is taking on a whole new meaning. Plus, a Marine veteran wonders about a phrase he heard oft ...…
 
To read this answer on eBible.com, follow this link: https://ebible.com/answers/22110
 
To read this answer on eBible.com, follow this link: https://ebible.com/answers/22110By Torah Teacher Ariel ben-Lyman HaNaviy.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Herman Melville.
 
"OK" is both the most spoken and written word in the entire world. It's such a fundamental part of modern communication that it's hard to imagine the world without it, yet in spite of its ubiquity and compact versatility, "OK" is under two hundred years old. Today's episode tells the story of the word's origins in 19th century America. If the l ...…
 
"OK" is both the most spoken and written word in the entire world. It's such a fundamental part of modern communication that it's hard to imagine the world without it, yet in spite of its ubiquity and compact versatility, "OK" is under two hundred years old. Today's episode tells the story of the word's origins in 19th century America. If the l ...…
 
Asperse is a verb that means to criticize or attack the character of someone. The Latin word aspergere (a SPARE ghere ay) means ‘to sprinkle’ or ‘to splatter.’ This may seem like an odd origin for a word that means ‘to attack someone’s character,’ but it may help to think of aspersing someone as splattering criticism on their reputation. For ex ...…
 
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