show episodes
 
In a time of populist politics with the rise of Trump and Brexit and disruptions to old media, this new La Trobe University podcast series explores themes of crisis in communication. In this six part series we look at problems for democracies around leadership and language, political polarisation, populism, resistance and silence of minority groups. We begin with a special lecture from New York political scientist Professor Stanley Feldman from Stony Brook University talking about the rise o ...
 
Anthropologists study human culture and society. They ask “what it is to be human?”. Anthropologists answer this question by analysing diverse societies to find out what all humans have in common. To undertake this study, anthropologists have a ‘kit’ full of conceptual tools. Join the Audible Anthropologist (aka La Trobe University’s Nicholas Herriman) as we describe some of these tools and put them to use.
 
In this subject students are introduced to China. The lectures are tied together by several common themes, including China’s incredible geographic, ethnic and cultural diversity, it’s dual exceptionalist and wounded nationalism, and the Deng Xiaoping-era social bargain between the Communist Party and the Chinese people based on improving living standards in exchange for acquiescence to one-party rule.
 
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Australian Environmental History

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Australian Environmental History

Professor Richard Broome and Professor Katie Holmes

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Just two centuries after European settlement, the human impact on the land, massive species extinction, and climate change, pose serious threats to the continent's fragile ecology. Students will consider Australia's early geological history; Indigenous land use; the competing ideas of land and land use among early settlers; and how various forms of land use shaped, and changed the environment.
 
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The Ottoman Empire

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The Ottoman Empire

Assoc Professor Adrian Jones

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The Ottoman empire began modestly in the late fourteenth century and soon grew to become a formidable world power, lasting for centuries until its decline and collapse in 1923. This subject will examine the cultural, architectural and political history of the Ottoman Empire from, spanning its history from the fourteenth century to the First World War.
 
The Roman World introduces students to the society, literature and art of ancient Rome, through a study of its major historical and literary figures, such as Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Virgil and Ovid. We shall look at Rome’s place in the ancient Mediterranean world, and its connections with ancient Greece and other cultures, such as Egypt and Gaul. Through almost constant warfare, Rome accumulated an enormous Mediterranean empire, and this subject will investigate how this shaped Roman ...
 
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Ancient Greece: Myth, Art, War

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Ancient Greece: Myth, Art, War

Professor Chris Mackie and Dr Gillian Shepherd

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In this subject students are introduced to the diversity of the ancient Greek achievement, which has exercised a fundamental and continuing influence upon later European literature and culture. The subject commences with a detailed treatment of Homer's Iliad and the myth of the Trojan war. This is one of the dominant myths in the Greek tradition and is narrated in some detail in epic poetry, in drama, and in art and architecture. We explore how myths are 'read' in their historical context, e ...
 
The aim of this subject is to identify the constraints and opportunities that will affect the ability of sports to survive in an increasingly competitive, global marketplace. Particular emphasis will be placed on examinations of both North American and European professional sports, as well as indigenous games, such as Australian Rules football. Topics covered will include: labour markets in various sports, including the effectiveness of regulations such as player drafts and salary caps; the ...
 
This subject explores Ancient Roman epic poetry, the literary genre which deals with grand mythical narratives involving heroes, gods, war, and love affairs. Epic was the most prestigious literary form in the ancient world. Roman poets adapted and developed Greek epic, particularly influenced by the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey. Roman epics similarly deal with divine and heroic material, but Roman poets also weave contemporary and topical themes into the mythical subject matter. The primary tex ...
 
This subject deals with the cultural history of the ancient Greek world through both textual sources and the material evidence of art and archaeology. The period covered runs from the Iron Age world of Archaic Greece through to the late Classical period (roughly from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE). We will concentrate mainly on Athens and mainland Greece, but we will also focus on the Greek expansion into other parts of the Mediterranean world (Sicily and South Italy) in the process ...
 
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show series
 
Australia has a strong alliance with America, one that has remained unwavering through changes of leadership and turbulent international developments. While agreements such as AUKUS and the Quad have strengthened our position in the region, it has come at the cost of relations with other states in the region and could in the future draw us into con…
 
Religious persecution wasn’t a new thing for Rome, but under the rule of Valerian they intensified. Christians were now the specified target, but the executions and confiscation of property did little to help the stability of the empire. Episode II of 'Valerian'. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of the Centre for Classical Studies…
 
The Catch. A podcast miniseries about modern slavery and forced labour in the offshore fishing industry in the Asia Pacific Region. Episode 4: Reintegration Episode 5 available now on all podcast platforms. Host: Dr Bec Strating (Executive Director, La Trobe Asia) Guest: Associate Professor Christina Stringer (Centre for Research on Modern Slavery,…
 
The Catch. A podcast miniseries about modern slavery and forced labour in the offshore fishing industry in the Asia Pacific Region. Episode 3: Restitution Episode 4 available now on all podcast platforms. Host: Dr Bec Strating (Executive Director, La Trobe Asia) Guest: Dr Sallie Yea (Tracey Banivanua Mar Fellow, La Trobe University) Produced by La …
 
The Chittagong Hill Tracts is in southeast Bangladesh, on the country’s border with India and Myanmar, and is home to 14 Indigenous groups. However, the state contests these people’s Indigenous status and identity. How will this impact their ability to participate in the UNESCO International Decade of Indigenous Languages, and what does it mean for…
 
The Catch. A podcast miniseries about modern slavery and forced labour in the offshore fishing industry in the Asia Pacific Region. Episode 2: In Too Deep Episode 3 available now on all podcast platforms. Host: Dr Bec Strating (Executive Director, La Trobe Asia) Guest: Dr Sallie Yea (Tracey Banivanua Mar Fellow, La Trobe University) Produced by La …
 
When Valerian became emperor in 253CE Rome was fighting on all fronts. With Shapur and the Syrians taking territory in the east, and Germanic tribes to the west and the north, the empire was going to get messy for Valerian and his newly established dynasty. Episode I of 'Valerian'. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of the Centre fo…
 
The Catch. A podcast miniseries about modern slavery and forced labour in the offshore fishing industry in the Asia Pacific Region. Episode 1: Recruitment Episode 2 available now on all podcast platforms. Host: Dr Bec Strating (Executive Director, La Trobe Asia) Guest: Dr Sallie Yea (Tracey Banivanua Mar Fellow, La Trobe University) Produced by La …
 
At the end of June the Philippines will welcome new leadership featuring two very familiar names. Following in his father’s footsteps is Bongbong Marcos, son of former dictator Ferdinand Marcos, and joining him as Vice-President is Sara Duterte, daughter of the current President. While Marcos and Duterte are both the children of politicians with co…
 
In this episode of the Edge Dwellers Cafe, Ben Habib is joined for special panel discussion with Anastasia Kanjere, Emily Foley, and Pan Karanikolas from the La Trobe Casuals Network, a volunteer group of casualised workers at La Trobe University who are dedicated to improving working conditions for casualised and insecure workers. The conversation…
 
Brian Blessed is a treasured British actor who for our purposes will fondly be remembered for his iconic role as Emperor Augustus in the 1976 BBC television series I, Claudius. Brian dominated the screen with his performance and we were very lucky to get the chance to speak to him. Now funding on Kickstarter: Agricola (the podcast miniseries). Gues…
 
In this episode of the Edge Dwellers Cafe Podcast, I’m joined in this spirit of Utopia-inspired critical bewilderment by Sarah Houseman to talk about her PhD research into non-hierarchical organisations. We discuss the many functional problems that arise in hierarchical organisations, from power relationships to functional organisational stupidity …
 
On the night of 18 July, 64 CE, a fire broke out in the Circus Maximus at Rome. It raged for nine days, destroying or damaging ten of the city’s fourteen regions. Was the fire just a terrible accident? Or was it deliberately lit, either by dissident Christians or by the emperor Nero, who allegedly sang while Rome burned? Recorded on 12th April 2022…
 
As Australians head to the voting booth, much of this election has focused on our regional relationships and our place in the global order. Many have labelled this a 'khaki election', with national security becoming a major election issue. The campaign so far has been dominated by regional issues, particularly the fallout of China's pact with the S…
 
While the twentieth century saw the collapse of monarchies across Europe, recent events are a reminder that hereditary monarchies still matter in Asia. In some countries like Malaysia and Bhutan the institution is thriving, but they can struggle for relevancy given the pro-democracy movement in Thailand and fast-modernising landscape of Japan. Gues…
 
Every year Rome held an election in which two senators were chosen for the role of consul. Being elected consul was a great honour, and the position was hotly contested, and a successful campaign depended upon the candidate’s military achievements, rhetorical skills and their willingness to be corrupt. Now funding on Kickstarter: Agricola (the podc…
 
Indonesia aspires to play an active and influential role in regional and global affairs, and its public expects broad influence. How can its foreign policy ideas adapt to a changing and contested region? And how can prospective partner countries such as Australia build trust and relationships? Guest: Professor Dewi Fortuna Anwar (Research Professor…
 
More than two years have passed since the death of Caesar, and we now find our story at the final battle of the Liberator’s war. Octavian and Mark Antony lead their forces west to confront Cassius and Brutus, who have amassed quite the army in the meantime. Part VI of 'The Liberator's War' Guest: Assistant Professor Steele Brand (History, The King’…
 
Japan occupies an ambitious position in geopolitics, desiring to maintain a balance of power in the face of a rising China, and to bring about economic prosperity, peace, and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. Guest: Associate Professor Stephen Nagy (Department of Politics and International Studies, International Christian University (ICU), Toky…
 
Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus have secured their alliance against Caesar's assassins, and since they have control of Rome, it's time for them to get rid of any competition. Proscribing an enemy means they will likely be executed, and their personal fortunes can be confiscated and put towards paying soldiers - and the second triumvirate make ful…
 
Since 2016, an estimated one million Uyghurs and members of other Turkic Muslim minorities have disappeared into a vast network of ‘re-education camps’ in the far west region of Xinjiang, China in what some experts call a systematic, government-led program of cultural genocide. Those outside detention are subject to intensive surveillance through a…
 
As regional powers in the Indo-Pacific, Australia and Japan have much to gain from increased bilateral cooperation and increased interaction through ‘minilaterals’ such as the Quad. Strategic forces are pushing the states closer together, and Australia relationship with Japan has never been closer. This is demonstrated by the ‘Special Strategic Par…
 
In this episode, Ben Habib is joined by Toad Dell and Guy Ritani from PermaQueer. PermaQueer is a collaborative project to share ecological sustainability methods through the lens of Permaculture, focusing on accessibility to and building resilience for traditionally marginalised communities. PermaQueer brings a queering, decolonising and trauma-in…
 
After his victory in at Mutina, Octavian desired honours that the senate declined to award him. This led him to re-evaluate who his enemy truly was, and make an alliance with the recently defeated Mark Antony. Part IV of 'The Liberator's War' Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University).…
 
This launch of Issue 6 of the La Trobe Asia Brief brings together emerging leaders to discuss critical issues facing the Indo-Pacific. Written by students and young professionals from a diverse range of areas, this event will explore gender and conflict resolution in the Indo-Pacific, Australian foreign policy and South Korea’s maritime strategy. A…
 
The Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region in northern China has, in recent years, been the site of extensive protests against changes to the education system that have diminished the role of the Mongolian language. What might the UN’s Decade of Indigenous Languages mean for the region’s Mongols and their struggle to protect their language? A three podc…
 
For all states across the Asia-Pacific women's representation in all sectors remains dismally low. The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have disproportionately affected women and girls across the Asia-Pacific, from alarming increases in domestic violence during extended lockdowns to the growing gender gap in employment opportunities. Addressin…
 
The Lepcha community is indigenous to the Himalayan mountains, and can be found across India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet. There's estimated to be less than 70,000 speakers of the Lepcha language, and while it is an official language of Sikkim retention is a challenge. A three podcast series exploring issues of indigenous languages to mark the beginni…
 
In this episode, Ben Habib is joined by James Blackwell, Research Fellow in Indigenous Diplomacy in the College of Asia and the Pacific at Australian National University in Canberra. A proud Wiradjuri man, James is one of Australia’s only practicing Aboriginal international relations academics, writing and speaking about global Indigenous movements…
 
As the power struggle in Rome continued and generals waged their war on the battlefield, Cicero took to the floors of the senate, confronting Antony with the greatest weapon in his arsenal: the spoken word. He called his speeches the Philippics, and they were influential in turning the senate against Antony. Part II of 'The Liberator's War' Guest: …
 
Asia is a linguistically diverse region, but this diversity is currently under threat. After centuries of colonisation and decades of rapid development, communities throughout Asia are facing distinct and urgent challenges to defend their rights to language in the face of discrimination, exclusion, and violence. How are Indigenous people and langua…
 
Caesar’s death created a power vacuum in the city of Rome. While Antony struggled against the senate to make a deal and assert his dominance, Octavian’s imminent arrival presented a rival he couldn’t anticipate. Part I of 'The Liberator's War' Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University).…
 
As we enter year three of the covid-19 and settle into our schedule of working from home, home-schooling and hopefully not catching a deadly plague, how are health systems in Asia coping and adapting with the pandemic? Guest: Professor Vivian Lin (Executive Associate Dean of LKS Faculty of Medicine at the University of Hong Kong and Adjunct Profess…
 
In this episode, Ben Habib is joined in conversation by Claire Kearns. Claire is a staunch disability and neurodiversity advocate, writer and social media content creator. in 2021, Claire won the La Trobe University Excellence Academy Inaugural Art Competition for her poem entitled “I Was”, about her experiences as a neurodiverse student at univers…
 
For the seventh time, listeners provide questions and Rhiannon and Matt answer! In this episode: - What happened to the original sources - Did the Romans have dogs, and how did they use them? - What types of jobs did the Romans have that don’t exist today? - Did far-flung provinces retain their own languages? - What kind of libraries did the Romans…
 
The Himalaya and the adjacent Tibetan plateau house the globe's third biggest ice packed are the source of most of Asia's major rivers. Over the past century of the people of these mountains have had to endure colonisation unstable geopolitics, and now a climate changing at twice the global average. Despite this they have survived and in some cases…
 
Romans had the reality of witches, those who made the brews and prepared the curses, but also the witches of fiction. In their poems and stories, a witch took on a horrific persona, one that skews much more closely to the modern idea of a witch. Guest: Associate Professor Rhiannon Evans (Head of Department of Languages and Linguistics, La Trobe Uni…
 
Hyein Ellen Cho is a PhD candidate at Monash University with research interests in the Korean diaspora in Australia, domestic and family violence, and North Korean migration. Prior to commencing her PhD studies, she worked as a project manager in the Cultural and Economic Affairs Section at the Consulate-General of the Republic of Korea in Melbourn…
 
Since the mass internment of Uyghurs and other indigenous groups in China was first reported in 2017, there is now a rich body of literature documenting recent human rights abuses in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. However, there is little knowledge of the actual perpetrators inside China’s vast and opaque party-state system. A report publis…
 
After a period of turmoil, Malaysia’s new Prime Minister, Ismail Sabri Yaakob, has a tenuous hold on leadership. A politician of the UMNO (United Malays National Organisation) coalition, his party returns to power a few short years after their first ever electoral defeat when former Prime Minister Najib Razak was tied to the 1MDB scandal involving …
 
A witch occupied a strange niche in the Roman world. Distrusted but respected, persecuted but employed by the most elite, a witch in Rome existed on the sidelines and spoken of in hushed terms, and to many of the powerful, a weapon that could be employed. Guest: Associate Professor Rhiannon Evans (Head of Department of Languages and Linguistics, La…
 
After a quiet start to his presidency, United States President Joe Biden has made some recent decisive steps in engaging with Asia by selling nuclear submarines to Australia and establishing the AUKUS pact, outlining an approach to trade with China, and hosting a Quad summit at the White House, gathering with key U.S. partners in Asia. A major part…
 
In this episode, Ben Habib is joined by Dr Terry Leahy, Conjoint Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Newcastle. Terry’s research explores food security and rural development, environmental politics and global environmental crisis, and the philosophy of the humanist realist perspective in sociological analysis. Terry’s research and con…
 
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