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From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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Join Linda Riesenberg Fisler and Joseph McGurl as they discuss Joseph's favorite Past Masters. Joseph discusses what captivated him, how they painted, and much more! Joseph also talks about capturing that elusive atmosphere in your painting and other techniques. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LindaRiesenbergFisler)…
 
It's an all-woman line-up on this week's podcast. Nancy Kenney speaks to Andrea Nelson, the curator of The New Woman Behind the Camera, an exhibition opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and touring later to the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Aimee Dawson talks to Camille Morineau, a former Centre Pompidou curator, about th…
 
This week: should the Science Museum in London stop taking money from the oil company Shell? We talk to a student activist, Anya Nanning Ramamurthy of the UK Student Climate Network, who held a protest at the Science Museum over the weekend of 19 and 20 June, and Chris Garrard, co-director of the ethical sponsorship campaigners Culture Unstained, a…
 
This week, we look at a much anticipated exhibition, Slavery at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The Rijksmuseum is the Netherlands’ national art and history museum and the curators of the exhibition state in the catalogue that the country’s colonial past has been "insufficiently examined in the national history of the Netherlands, including at the Ri…
 
This week: two festivals of art. Aimee Dawson talks to Frida Kahlo and Kathe Kollwitz of the Guerrilla Girls about their ongoing activism and their new billboards for Art Night, while Ben Luke discusses Glasgow International with its director, Richard Parry, and then reviews the work in the festival with The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art corresp…
 
This week: Mary Beard on Nero, one of the most infamous Roman emperors. Was he the sadistic murderer of legend, the emperor who fiddled as Rome burned, or has he been a victim of spin and myth? As well as getting Mary’s take on this infamous figure and Nero: the man behind the myth, the exhibition about him that’s just opened at the British Museum …
 
This week: Viking-age treasures—what the medieval gold, silver, textiles and even dirt in a hoard found in 2014 in Scotland can tell us about the Viking age, its people, its art and its international networks. Ben Luke talks to the curator Martin Goldberg about the Galloway Hoard, which has just gone on view at the National Museum of Scotland in Ed…
 
Ben Luke talks to Ralph Rugoff, artistic director of the last Venice Biennale and director of the Hayward Gallery, London, about Matthew Barney and Igshaan Adams, two very different artists exploring autobiography, social issues and dance, among much else, at the Hayward; Louisa Buck talks to the curator Laura Smith as the Whitechapel Gallery unvei…
 
It's a big week in the New York salerooms: Scott Reyburn, art market expert for The Art Newspaper and The New York Times, discusses the big sales and notable trends at Christie’s and Sotheby’s New York auctions. Meanwhile, as museums in England get ready to open for the first time in five months, we talk to Heather Phillipson about her new exhibiti…
 
This week: ecocide in Brazil. In a special in-depth interview marking a retrospective at Fondazione MAST in Bologna, Italy, and an exhibition at the Jack Shainman Gallery in New York, the artist Richard Mosse discusses his photographs and forthcoming film installation picturing the scale of the destruction of the Amazonian rainforest. Mosse also ta…
 
This week: Los Angeles has finally opened its museums after more than a year. When New York's galleries have been open since August, what took California so long? We talk to Jori Finkel about LA's slow emergence from lockdown. Also: DB Burkeman tells us about his new book Art Sleeves, a trawl through 40 years of artist-designed record covers. And i…
 
This week on the now award-winning The Week in Art: Kusamarama. We take a deep dive into Yayoi Kusama’s polka dots, pumpkins and infinity rooms as shows open in New York, Washington, London and Berlin. We’re joined by three curators: Frances Morris, the director of Tate Modern in London, talks about Kusama’s Infinity Rooms; Mika Yoshitake, the cura…
 
We are deeply saddened to hear that Richard Schmid passed this past weekend (April 17-18, 2021). In his honor, we are playing the interview with his daughter Molly, who talked about Richard's work and art as well as his book Alla Prima II. Rest in Peace, Richard, and thank you for all your work as an artist and author. Support the show (https://www…
 
This week: after four long months, commercial art galleries are open again in England. We discuss some of the London shows with Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and take a tour of Rachel Whiteread’s exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery in Grosvenor Hill, London. And we talk to the artist Idris Khan, who has a new exhib…
 
On this week's podcast: the world’s greatest art heist. As a new Netflix documentary hits our screens, who stole the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Manet, among other items, and are we any closer to finding them? We talk to Jeff Siegel, producer of the new Netflix series This is a Robbery about the 1990 heist …
 
The Art Newspaper’s annual survey of museum attendance is out: just how many visitors and how much money have museums lost in the pandemic? And how have digital initiatives helped? José da Silva, exhibitions editor at The Art Newspaper, and one of the editors of our annual visitor figures survey, talks about the 77% global fall in visitor numbers a…
 
This week: Germany announces that its museums will send the Benin bronzes back to Nigeria: will other nations follow? We talk to Catherine Hickley, who broke the story of Germany’s planned restitution of the bronzes in The Art Newspaper this week, and to Dan Hicks, whose book The Brutish Museums tells the story of British colonial destruction and l…
 
On this week's podcast: the most influential annual art market report has just been published—so what does it tell us about the effects of a year of Covid-19 on the market? We talk to Clare McAndrew, the author of the The Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report. Also in this episode, we talk to the scholar of Dada and Surrealism, Dawn Ades, abou…
 
This week, we focus on two books: Aimee Dawson talks to Alice Procter about the debate over contested heritage in the UK and her book The Whole Picture, a strident call for colonial histories to be told in museums. Jori Finkel speaks to Glenn Adamson about Craft: An American History, a radical reappraisal of craft's role in forging American identit…
 
This week: the Frick Collection in New York has moved temporarily from its Gilded Age Mansion on Central Park to Marcel Breuer’s 1960s building created for the Whitney Museum. So what happens when the Old Masters meet Brutalism? We talk to Xavier Salomon, deputy director and chief curator of the Frick about this remarkable change of setting for one…
 
This week: NFTs or Non-Fungible Tokens. What are they? Are they a fad or do they represent the future of the art market? We talk to two people in the world of crypto commodities about the explosion of NFTs on the art market. We hear from the artist Beeple, whose piece Everydays: The First 5000 Days is the first standalone NFT work of art to be sold…
 
This week: the curator Naomi Beckwith and artist Okwui Okpokwasili discuss Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America, a major show at the New Museum in New York—the final project conceived by the late curator Okwui Enwezor. Also, we explore the effect of Covid-19 on artists with disabilities: we talk to the artist Cara Macwilliam and to Hann…
 
Linda, Cherie, and Joanna discuss gestures and explore its use in all forms of #art, from #dance, to #painting, to #drawing, #music, and #writing. Lifesoup.blog, Lindafisler.com JoannaPangAtkins.com #podcast #artchat Video of this chat available at https://youtu.be/YRMSWlaLU1k Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LindaRiesenbergFisler)…
 
This week: excavations have revealed new archaeological finds at Stonehenge but the UK government has approved a road tunnel through this iconic World Heritage Site—will it ruin it? We talk to Mike Pitts, an archaeologist, about the debate over the tunnel and its effect on the ancient stones and their surrounding landscape. Plus: museums in France …
 
On this week's podcast: the artist-activists at the heart of Russia’s biggest protests in a decade and how the Indian government is using heritage and museums to re-write the history of the country. We talk to Lölja Nordic, an artist, DJ and activist in Saint Petersburg, who appeared in a video released this week by Pussy Riot, Russia’s most famous…
 
This week, the Old Masters in the digital age. We look at the $92m live-streamed auction sale (with fees) of a major Botticelli in New York and new research, including a study using artificial intelligence, into Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi. While a prize Botticelli sold for a record price for the early Renaissance master at Sotheby's, a Rembrandt, ex…
 
This week: as Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are sworn in as the president and vice president of the United States, what might their administration do for the visual arts? We talk to Jori Finkel, a regular contributor to The Art Newspaper and The New York Times from Los Angeles. We explore an extraordinary story linking QAnon, the far-right conspiracy…
 
This week, we look at white supremacist art in the Capitol in Washington and discuss the legacy of Hannah Arendt. Plus, we look at a record-breaking auction sale of a Batman comic. Sarah Beetham, chair of liberal arts and assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, discusses the statue of the Confederate General…
 
It’s the final episode of 2020 and so, as we always do as the year comes to an end, we’re reviewing the last 12 months in the art world. And what a year it’s been. Host Ben Luke was joined by three of The Art Newspaper’s correspondents on the frontline reporting the huge events of the year and their effects on the art world. Anna Brady is our art m…
 
The Brexit deadline is imminent and the UK and the European Union are desperately seeking an agreement. But what are the implications either way for the art trade? We asked the writer and art market specialist Ivan Macquisten and former Conservative MEP and current chief executive of the British Chamber of Commerce in Brussels, Daniel Dalton. And f…
 
Linda talks about her favorite drawing books that you can gift yourself with this holiday season or ask for someone to gift you with these books. She also talks about starting to dabble in watercolors in the near future. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LindaRiesenbergFisler)By Linda Riesenberg Fisler
 
This week, we look at contemporary public art, as debate has raged about various works in recent weeks. Who is public art for and why does it continue to provoke such strong reactions? Host Ben Luke talks to Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and James Lingwood from the visionary producers of public works, Artangel, ab…
 
This week we look at museums and Africa: we explore the future of museums and African institutions’ central role in it and we look at the 19th-century looting of the Benin Bronzes and what it tells us about museums and colonialism, then and now. We talk to Sonia Lawson, the founding director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo, and András Szántó, the wri…
 
It’s Thanksgiving on 26 November, so this week, we look at the myths behind this American holiday, and particularly the story of the Mayflower, the ship that landed in Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts, 400 years ago. We talk to Jo Loosemore, the curator of the exhibition Mayflower 400: Legend and Legacy at The Box in Plymouth, about the voyage, the sett…
 
Just in time for the holidays, Linda discusses the painting books on her bookshelves for those who are looking for great books to help them become inspired and better painters. Linda also talks about how these books can help you find your voice and push the envelope of your paintings. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LindaRiesenbergFisler)…
 
This week: we speak to our China correspondent Lisa Movius in Shanghai about the fairs and other events opening in the city this week. And we look at a rare museum event opening in Europe: Tate Britain’s Winter Commission, which—because it’s on the facade of the building—opens to the public this week; Louisa Buck meets the latest artist to take on …
 
As the ramifications of the US election are set to continue for weeks, where do we stand in the art world? We look at the economics and the response of artists and art communities over the last four years and into the future. We talk to Felix Salmon, the chief financial correspondent at Axios, about the economic situation and its potential effects;…
 
This week: like the rest of the art world, the market has been upended by the pandemic. But has the turmoil forced it to be any more transparent? Do we know any more about the actual price of art? Ben Luke is joined by Georgina Adam, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper and art market specialist, to discuss transparency and the market. Also this…
 
Linda discusses the effect on the current pandemic/times and how we might be struggling to find inspiration and tap into our creativity. As she discusses quick exercises or suggests quick ways to tap into our creativity, she guides us through a mental process to awaken our creativity and inspire us. Feel more creative and inspired now! Support the …
 
Following a historic relaxation of deaccessioning laws in the US, we probe the moral quandaries faced by museums forced to sell-off parts of their collections to stay afloat. We speak to Christopher Bedford, the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art in Maryland, which has announced it is to sell three works; to Georgina Adam about what this all m…
 
This week, we talk to the critics and curators Barry Schwabsky and Aindrea Emelife about the four-year delay to the show Philip Guston Now at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the museums of fine arts in Houston and Boston and Tate Modern in London. What does the postponement of a big show of the American artist’s work tell us about museum…
 
It’s Frieze Week in London, yet there’s no big art fair at its heart. Can galleries create the usual excitement—and is anyone still buying? There’s no Frieze London or Frieze Masters but there are plenty of exhibitions and events being staged across the city, the now customary online viewing rooms and digital sales platforms and a big New York auct…
 
This week, we look at two great women artists: at last, we visit the postponed Artemisia exhibition at the National Gallery in London, taking a tour with its curator Letizia Treves, and picking out some of the extraordinary highlights of the show. And we also explore a new biography of Frida Kahlo with its author, Hettie Judah. See acast.com/privac…
 
With UK museums and galleries in crisis, might the Royal Academy of Arts be forced to sell its Michelangelo? We look at the story that has emerged in recent days that some Royal Academicians—the artists and architects that run the RA—are suggesting selling the Taddei Tondo to prevent huge job losses and keep the Academy afloat. Also this week: Marg…
 
This week: the artist Grayson Perry has a new exhibition and documentary series about the United States. What can a British artist and broadcaster tell us about the faultlines in American culture? Louisa Buck talks to him in his show at Victoria Miro in London. Ben Luke talks to the curator and art historian Robert Storr, the author of a huge new b…
 
It’s Berlin Art Week, and unusually for 2020, art fairs, a biennale, and a range of exhibitions are all opening at once in the German capital. But is Berlin still the thriving art centre it’s been over the last two decades? We talk to the Canadian artist and adoptive Berliner AA Bronson about participating in one of the big shows opening this week,…
 
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