show episodes
 
If you’ve ever studied German (and maybe even if you haven’t), you’re likely to find this short essay to be hilarious. Published as Appendix D from Twain’s 1880 book A Tramp Abroad, this comedic gem outlines the pitfalls one will encounter when trying to wrap one’s mind around the torturous German cases, adjective endings, noun genders, and verb placement. (Summary by Kara)
 
This second collection of essays by Mark Twain is a good example of the diversity of subject matter about which he wrote. As with the essays in Volume 1, many first appeared alone, in magazines or newspapers, before being printed as chapters of his larger works, while others were taken from larger works and reprinted in collections of essays. On top of being prolific, Mark Twain was a very successful marketer of his works. Volume 2 contains the following works: 1.) "A Curious Experience" - 1 ...
 
"Those Extraordinary Twins" was published as a short story, separate and distinct from its origins inside Twain's "The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson". As Twain explains, he extricated "Twins" from "Pudd'nhead" when he found, as he was writing, that he'd created a farce inside a tragedy. This is the excised farce, a story about Italian Siamese twins who completely take over a small Missouri town, splitting it down the middle with half supporting one head and the other, the other. (Introduction ...
 
Fenimore Cooper - author of The Deerslayer, The Last of the Mohicans, etc - has often been praised, but just as often been criticised for his writing. Mark Twain wrote a funny, vicious little essay on the subject, in which he states: "In one place in 'Deerslayer,' and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offences against literary art out of a possible 115." (Summary by Gesine)
 
Mark Twain coined the phrase that we take as our title. We attempt to bring some order to the water chaos, especially in the West. From water rights to conservation to re-purposing industrial by-product water to making sure you have crops to eat and water to drink. Marvin Nash, John Robitaille, Darren Smith and Jeff Holder offer thoughts and commentary to this vital issue. Sponsored by Synergy For Ecological Solutions which bring climate wellness through soil health.
 
Tom Sawyer, Detective is an 1896 novel by Mark Twain. It is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), and Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894). Tom Sawyer attempts to solve a mysterious murder in this burlesque of the immensely popular detective novels of the time. Tom and Huck find themselves with Uncle Silas and his family again (see "Huck Finn"), and much of the drama ends up focusing on Uncle Silas. Like the two preceding novels, the story is told using ...
 
As the title reveals, these stories are a collection of some of Mark Twain's more fanciful and eccentric works. They run the gamut from political commentary to our species' need to "be remembered" somehow. Taken as a whole the stories are "whimsical". Taken individually, they speak the truth in different ways. (Introduction by John Greenman)
 
A Horse's Tale is a novel by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), written partially in the voice of Soldier Boy, who is Buffalo Bill's favorite horse, at a fictional frontier outpost with the U.S. 7th Cavalry. With a fanciful mix of points of view, we hear the story of Cathy and her relationship with Soldier Boy and the soldiers of the 7th Cavalry. A surprisingly graphic depiction of a Spanish bullfight leaves no doubt where Mark Twain's sympathies lie. (Introduction by John Greenman & Wikipedia)
 
The podcast most capable of ruining bookstores for you forever. TV's Kevin Lanigan, Vern Tooley, Joe Konroy, & Justin Germeroth are veteran improvisers, taking their singular gifts for bringing silly characters to life directly to you. What if all the great writers you learned about in school were alive and well? What if they were unstable morons? What if Jane Austen swung from the chandelier on weekends and Mark Twain was a weird racist? These are the kinds of questions we answer here. You ...
 
"The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" is a piece of short fiction by Mark Twain. It first appeared in Harper's Monthly in December 1899, and was subsequently published by Harper Collins in the collection The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg and Other Stories and Sketches (1900). This recording contains all the stories and sketches from the 1900 Harper Collins publication. (Summary from wikipedia and John)
 
The American Claimant is an 1892 novel by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. The story focuses on the class differences and expectations of monarchic, hierarchical Britain and the upstart, "all men are created equal" America. Twain wrote the novel with the help of phonographic dictation, the first author (according to Twain himself) to do so. This was also (according to Twain) an attempt to write a book without mention of the weather, the first of its kind in fictitious literature. Ind ...
 
If ever there was a story written based unabashedly on adventure and trouble, this is it. There are treasure hunts and murderers on the run in this book that will keep you spellbound. Tom and his half-brother, Sid, lived with their aunt, Polly. Tom was a boisterous young fellow who constantly found himself in rather awkward situations that landed him into trouble. These situations were however exceedingly hilarious. On one occasion, Tom dirtied his clothes in a fight and his punishment was t ...
 
"What Is Man?", published by Mark Twain in 1906, is a dialogue between a young man and an older man jaded to the world. It involves ideas of destiny and free will, as well as of psychological egoism. The Old Man asserted that the human being is merely a machine, and nothing more. The Young Man objects, and asks him to go into particulars and furnish his reasons for his position. This collection of short stories covers a wide range of Twain's interests: the serious, the political and the iron ...
 
This is Mark Twain's vicious and amusing review of Fenimore Cooper's literary art. It is still read widely in academic circles. Twain's essay, Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses (often spelled "Offences") (1895), particularly criticized The Deerslayer and The Pathfinder. Twain wrote at the beginning of the essay: 'In one place in Deerslayer, and in the restricted space of two-thirds of a page, Cooper has scored 114 offenses against literary art out of a possible 115. It breaks the record.' ...
 
The town of Hadleyburg had the reputation of being the most honest town in a wide area, indeed an incorruptible community. The elders took this reputation so to heart that they brought up their children shielded from all temptation and trained thoroughly in total honesty. However, a stranger passing through the community was seriously offended by the actions of residents of this Utopia, and he vowed to gain revenge. After several years he came up with the perfect plan to embarrass the town a ...
 
"A good candidate for 'the most under-appreciated work by Mark Twain' would be 'The Treaty With China,' which he published in the New York Tribune in 1868. This piece, which is an early statement of Twain's opposition to imperialism and which conveys his vision of how the U.S. ought to behave on the global stage, has not been reprinted since its original publication until now." (the online, open-access "Journal of Transnational American Studies" published it in the spring, 2010).
 
Writer/entertainer Garrison Keillor (A Prairie Home Companion) on “The Innocents Abroad”: “…one of the best selling travel books of all time.” (The Writer’s Almanac, June 8, 2012) When you dive into Mark Twain’s (Samuel Clemens’) The Innocents Abroad, you have to be ready to learn more about the unadorned, ungilded reality of 19th century “touring” than you might think you want to learn. This is a tough, literary journey. It was tough for Twain and his fellow “pilgrims”, both religious and o ...
 
The Angry Christian Podcast explores the paths we take into and out of our anger as Christians who have been called to be full of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control (Galatians 5:22-23). Some of us are far better at these things than others. But that doesn't mean the ones who struggle get a pass. The damage we do to others and to ourselves when we live in a perpetual state of anger is immense. In the words of Mark Twain, "Anger is an aci ...
 
There’s something about that “Old Man River” which brings out the storyteller. Reflections from the River comes from the banks of the Mississippi River, upstream from Memphis, downstream from St. Louis, where the aircraft carrier sized tows negotiate the twists and bends of America’s artery. In these five to ten-minute vignettes a modern-day Mark Twain, with the occasional O. Henry twist to an ending, holds a mirror to middle America, its challenges and its strengths. Author and speaker, Bil ...
 
This long essay is a work of mock philology, one of several appendices to Twain’s travel novel, A Tramp Abroad. In it, Twain explains, complains about, and shows how one might improve upon various aspects of the (awful) German language. His examples of precisely how the German language is awful include the famed “separable verb” – which allows one to put the first part of a given verb at the beginning – and its second part at the end – of a given clause or sentence (which may, indeed, be ver ...
 
A Tramp Abroad is a work of non-fiction travel literature by American author Mark Twain, published in 1880. The book details a journey by the author, with his friend Harris (a character created for the book, and based on his closest friend, Joseph Twichell), through central and southern Europe. While the stated goal of the journey is to walk most of the way, the men find themselves using other forms of transport as they traverse the continent. The book is often thought to be an unofficial se ...
 
It was published in 1893–1894 by Century Magazine in seven installments, and is a detective story with some racial themes. The plot of this novel is a detective story, in which a series of identities — the judge’s murderer, Tom, Chambers — must be sorted out. This structure highlights the problem of identity and one’s ability to determine one’s own identity. Broader issues of identity are the central ideas of this novel. One of Twain’s major goals in this book was to exploit the true nature ...
 
The semiautobiographical travel memoir records Twain’s, more or less, personal journey across the Wild West in search of adventure while exploring variable locations. Accompanying his brother on what becomes a trip of a lifetime, the young Samuel Clemens finds himself in many different vocational roles as he explores and observes the magnificence of the American West. Not refraining from the usual social commentary, Twain directs criticism on various social and moral issues which he approach ...
 
Come and hear the strange tail of The Boss Hank Morgan, a modern day (at the time of publication) Connecticut Yankee who inexplicably finds himself transported to the court of the legendary King Arthur (as the title of the book implies). Hank, or simply, The Boss, as he comes to be most frequently known, quickly uses his modern day knowledge and education to pass himself off as a great magician, to get himself out of all sorts of surprising, (and frequently amusing) situations, as well as to ...
 
This long essay is a work of mock philology, one of several appendices to Twain’s travel novel, A Tramp Abroad. In it, Twain explains, complains about, and shows how one might improve upon various aspects of the (awful) German language. His examples of precisely how the German language is awful include the famed “separable verb” – which allows one to put the first part of a given verb at the beginning – and its second part at the end – of a given clause or sentence (which may, indeed, be ver ...
 
Eve's Diary is a comic short story by Mark Twain. It was first published in the 1905 Christmas issue of the magazine Harper's Bazaar, and in book format in June 1906 by Harper and Brothers publishing house. It is written in the style of a diary kept by the first woman in the Judeao-Christian creation myth, Eve, and is claimed to be "translated from the original MS." The "plot" of this novel is the first-person account of Eve from her creation up to her burial by, her mate, Adam, including me ...
 
He’s a writer people are already calling the next Mark Twain. Author David Pierson offers listeners a humorous glimpse into the many minds of his imaginary friends. He and they touch on everything from Shakespeare to Dr. Seuss, from education, politics, and culture to religion. Listen here to a funny, insightful original thinker.
 
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show series
 
We think water is just water. Just H2O. But water is actually pretty complex and in this episode we dive deep and conclude that water isn't just water. Listen in to the conversation to find out why. The Water Guys are Marvin Nash, John Robitaille, Neal Fehringer, Darren Smith, and Jeff Holder. Helpful links: EncoreGreenEnvironmental.com/cbd Synergy…
 
We visit the often discussed and little understood topic of the "coal bed methane days" which was an initiative in Wyoming in the early 2000's. What'd we learn from it and how can that help us today? The Water guys kick it around. Helpful links: EncoreGreenEnvironmental.com SynergyForEcologicalSolutions.org The Water Guys are John Robitaille, Darre…
 
The Water Guys bring along agronomist Neal Fehringer to explore the multi-syllable word P-h-o-t-o-s-y-n-t-h-e-s-is, which is the key to not only healthy soil but better air quality. And guess what makes that all happen? You're right -- water! Find out why we're fighting about water for our soils with the Water Guys: Marvin Nash, John Robitaille, Da…
 
S3E39 Today, Ash talks more to his special guest for the Henry VI episodes, Hailey Bachrach, about adapting Shakespeare, diverse casting and the "protagonist vacuum" in Henry VI. You can visit Hailey's website here: https://haileybachrach.com/about/ Sign up to her newsletter, Dramatis Personae: shakespeare.substack.com And follow her on Twitter: @h…
 
S3E38 Today, we begin an ambitious podcast trilogy on Shakespeare's earliest history plays - the three parts of Henry VI. Picking up from where we left off, today's play opens with the funeral of Henry V. For his infant son, the first phase of his reign will be threatened by a French renaissance, and rumbles of civil war in his own country. Joining…
 
Recently I saw a social media friend of mine (who also happens to be a pastor) post the following statement: "What are you going to do about your complacent approach to Jesus and His church?" And it got me thinking about the many times I have accused the church body of being too complacent, or apathetic, or disconnected from the Church. Reality is,…
 
In this episode the Water Guys explore just why water is for fighting. From water rights for ranchers and farmers to municipalities swiping water to build their cities, water is definitely for fighting. If you're in the West, deal with water professionally, or if you plan on having a drink of water today -- you won't want to miss this episode. The …
 
S3E37 John Steinbeck’s The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights was published posthumously in 1976. Though unfinished, it is a fascinating record of a legendary American writer attempting to translate Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur into modern language. Tune in to learn all about Steinbeck’s process, his interpretation of Malory as a novelist and …
 
You may not realize this, but there were 7 mass shootings in 6 different states in the month of March 2021 within the span of 10 days. And one of them happened down the road from Eric Nevins, host and founder of the Halfway There Podcast, founder of the Christian Podcasters Association, and the Religion & Spirituality Category Director for Podcast …
 
Everyone has that one neighbor. Maybe in some cases you have more than just the one. But you know what I'm talking about... The neighbor who is completely inconsiderate and rude, cares nothing about what others think and how they might be disturbing their neighbors around them, and when confronted looks at you like you're the one who is being an in…
 
I don't feel like this was a good enough apology, so I wanted to add the following:I’ve got a history of both saying and doing dumb things in the name of trying to be funny and, for that, I’m really sorry.I make things in an attempt to make people happy so it really sucks when I end up hurting people. That’s the opposite of my goals. I want my art …
 
COVID raised a lot of questions about what governments can and can't do in regards to church and worship. Most of the concerns raised, however, come from a place that doesn't fully understand worship and the purpose of the church. Let's talk about that. Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/angrychristianpodcast)…
 
S3E36 A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is Mark Twain's rollicking attack on the Arthurian romances. Join us today as we discuss Twain, typewriters, and dynamiting wizards out of the water. Title Music: 'Not Drunk' by The Joy Drops. All other music by Epidemic Sound. Sound Bite: The Simpsons. www.patreon.com/earreadthis @earreadthis earre…
 
At abortion centers it is often asked of those Christians who show up to reach out to the young mothers and fathers entering to get an abortion, "What are you going to do for them?" Glad you asked....here's the churches response. (Blogcast from Brian Baldwin, one of the hosts of the Angry Christian Podcast) Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/angry…
 
S3E35 Today Ash is joined once again by special guest Aaron Sidwell to talk more about his recent performance of Henry V at the Barn Theatre in Cirencester, his YouTube Series Bard from the Barn and the future of theatre in a post-Covid world. Watch Aaron's production here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynSpVRu_8kE Title Music: 'Not Drunk' by The…
 
S3E34 We reach the end of Shakespeare's second cycle of English History plays with Henry V - the story of England's glorious King and his famous victories in France. Joining Ash to discuss the play is special guest Aaron Sidwell, who has recently played Henry in a production at the Barn Theatre in Cirencester. Watch Aaron's production here: https:/…
 
He knew better. He knew teachers would be judged more harshly. He knew that invoking God's name in these abuses was a direct violation of the 4th commandment. He knew that the things done in the dark would be brought to the light. He knew the consequences of sexual sin. So... why? Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/angrychristianpodcast)…
 
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