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Best Native American Art podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Native American Art podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
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See the art world through my eyes as an art dealer with thirty years in the business. Interviews of unique and interesting individuals that collect, deal and find art as compelling as I do. Learn the pitfalls of the art world and the interesting cast of characters that are a constant thread of entertaining commentary. Pull up a chair with me, Mark Sublette and the Art Dealer Diaries.
 
Contemporary artist and native Southerner Vivian Liddell interviews women on art & the South. Bringing together women of all sorts to talk about their inspirations and definitions of art, and how these individual opinions reflect our changing region.
 
What is Japanese food? Sushi? Ramen? Kaiseki? What about Izakaya? What exactly are they? Akiko Katayama, a Japanese native, New York-based food writer and director of the New York Japanese Culinary Academy, will tell you all about the real Japanese food and food culture. Her guests will range from a sake producer whose family has centuries of sake-making history, to a great American chef who pushes the envelope of Japanese cuisine. Japanese cuisine is demystified here!
 
This book features a series of short stories collected by renowned ethnologist Henry R. Schoolcraft. The stories are adapted from old Native American legends with the aim to protect their authenticity from future contamination. Schoolcraft made it his duty to learn the Native American folklore, after living among them in the Great Lakes region and experiencing their culture firsthand. The allegorical collection include tales of adventure, whilst offering exciting explanations for natural phe ...
 
Charley Jones, a native Texan, has enjoyed a 40 year radio career entirely within in the Dallas/Fort Worth radio market. Conversant with and passionate about the American Revolution, world history and global affairs, Jones majored in History at the University of Texas Arlington before landing his first radio job at one of America's premier rock stations, KZEW-FM, The Zoo, in Dallas, Texas.
 
The Last of the Mohicans is an epic novel by James Fenimore Cooper, first published in January 1826.It was one of the most popular English-language novels of its time, and helped establish Cooper as one of the first world-famous American writers.The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain battled for control of the American and Canadian colonies. During this war, the French often allied themselves with Native American tribes in order to gain ...
 
Jonathan Edwards was a colonial American Congregational preacher, theologian, and missionary to Native Americans. Edwards “is widely acknowledged to be America’s most important and original philosophical theologian.” His work is very broad in scope, but he is often associated with his defense of Calvinist theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, and the Puritan heritage. His famous sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” emphasized the just wrath of God against sin and co ...
 
iHeartRadio and WeWork are back with a new season of Art of the Hustle – a podcast designed to inspire entrepreneurs and fuel their life’s work. With a casual and comfortable interview approach, listeners are invited into a conversation between our host Jeff Rosenthal, co-Founder of Summit, and his guests, exploring stories of success, failure, milestone events and of course, key advice that shapes the life of an entrepreneur.
 
A whaling ship stops at a remote Polynesian island. The crew aboard is exhausted after a grueling six-month voyage in which they suffered ill-treatment and drudgery. Two men decide to abandon ship and hide on the island, living off the fruit of the land, until they can get on board a more conducive ship. However, to their consternation they discover that part of the island paradise is peopled by a savage and cannibalistic tribe called the Typees. As destiny would have it, they fall into the ...
 
AmerIndian 2192 is a science-fiction novel that explores the intriguing possibilities of Native Americans in mankind's star flung future. AmerIndian 2192 presents the story of two brothers, Wovoka and Keokuk, restoring the Native American people to a Homeland where their vibrant culture can thrive. Lodge ships, Cybershaman rituals and Tsimshian high technology are all elements in this action-oriented tale of interstellar politics and personal struggles.
 
The semiautobiographical travel memoir records Twain’s, more or less, personal journey across the Wild West in search of adventure while exploring variable locations. Accompanying his brother on what becomes a trip of a lifetime, the young Samuel Clemens finds himself in many different vocational roles as he explores and observes the magnificence of the American West. Not refraining from the usual social commentary, Twain directs criticism on various social and moral issues which he approach ...
 
Gem City Podcast is the first podcast that is all about Dayton! Bi-weekly episodes will highlight and discuss local news topics including business, politics, art, events, and other headlines from Dayton, Ohio. Each episode will feature one or more local guest hosts who will help us examine what is happening in our community. Our target audience is anyone that is interested in keeping up with local topics presented by local Daytonians. Listeners should expect to hear about important business ...
 
Someone once observed that if Howard Stern and Krista Tippett had a love child, it would be Scott Jones. Scott liked that.At "Give and Take,” Scott Jones talks with artists, authors, theologians, and political pundits about the lens through which they experience life. With empathy, humor, and a deep knowledge of religion, current events, and pop culture, Scott engages his guests in a free-flowing conversation that's entertaining, unexpected, occasionally bizarre, and oftentimes enlightening. ...
 
Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was first published in 1913. It was the third book in an eleven part series known as the Barsoom Chronicles which relate to a sequence of exciting adventure tales set on the fictional planet of Barsoom. In the Barsoom series, Mars, assumed to be older than Earth, is a dying planet. “Barsoom” is the native word for Mars in the Martian language. The stories first appeared in serialized form in various magazines like All-Story, Argosy, Amazing Stories and ...
 
Hollywood NDNz is a weekly podcast that explores the trials and tribulations of the entertainment industry through the perspective of Native American entertainment professionals. The podcast is hosted by Rainy Fields (Muscogee (Creek)/Cherokee), Tim Ramos (Pomo), and Jim Ruel (Ojibwe).
 
Join Dave and Elise every week for a buggy-ride of cinematic exploration. A bilingual Montreal native and a Prairies hayseed gravitate to Toronto for the film culture, meet on OK Cupid, and spur on each other's movie-love, culminating in this podcast. Expect in-depth discussion of their old favourites (mostly studio-era Hollywood) and their latest frontiers (courtesy of the TIFF Cinematheque and various Toronto rep houses and festivals). The podcast will be comprised of several potentially n ...
 
WELCOME TO INDIAN & COWBOY Indian & Cowboy is an independent Indigenous media company that creates, produces & publishes Indigenous media projects across multiple platforms on the internet & for broadcast media.We are rooted firmly at the intersection between digital media art, podcasting & Indigenous Storytelling.We aim to disrupt, engage & empower.These are our stories.
 
The delightfully eccentric Doctor Dolittle, rendered immortal on screen by the gifted Rex Harrison, has remained a firm favorite with generations of children ever since he made his debut in an earlier novel, The Story of Doctor Dolittle. In his second outing titledThe Voyages of Doctor Dolittle, the maverick physician takes on a new assistant, Tommy Stubbins. The story is structured as a first person account given by Tommy, who is now a very old man. The boy who was the son of the village co ...
 
With no written language, Native Americans living in the Lake Superior region passed their cultural identity down through the generations by way of stories. Far more than mere tales to amuse children, they passed along the collective wisdom of the tribes. In the 1830s, government Indian Agent and ethnologist Henry R Schoolcraft learned the language of these people and went out to collect and preserve their stories before the tribes disappeared under the westward rush of American civilization ...
 
John Wesley Powell was a pioneer American explorer, ethnologist, and geologist in the 19th Century. In 1869 he set out to explore the Colorado and the Grand Canyon. He gathered nine men, four boats and food for ten months and set out from Green River, Wyoming, on May 24. Passing through dangerous rapids, the group passed down the Green River to its confluence with the Colorado River (then also known as the Grand River upriver from the junction), near present-day Moab, Utah. The expedition’s ...
 
Old Rail Fence Corners is an historical treasure trove containing the stories of the first significant waves of European-American settlers in the now state of Minnesota (United States of America). This book has direct accounts of mid-19th century lives and experiences on the frontier, recounted by the frontiersmen and women when many of them were in their mid-90s. A group of volunteer women -- the Book Committee -- sought to record these recollections before they were lost with the passing o ...
 
How have writers, illustrators, film makers, and musicians shaped the American experience? In this podcast series historian Dr. Darren R. Reid explores American history through the lens of the artist. From classic comics books to music and film, this podcast examines how art and artistry has reflected and informed the American experience.Featured iTunes podcast (January and February 2014), #1 episodes in Education and Higher Education. Current series, "Comic Book Studies" explores the histor ...
 
The Indigenous Artways podcast series is produced by the Tomaquag Museum, located in the state of Rhode Island USA, which is dedicated to telling the story of the First Peoples of this land, highlighting the Narragansett as well as other Eastern Woodland Coastal Tribal Nations. Our podcasts features educational content which teaches different aspects of Native American history and culture through the use of art, music, and stories. Viewers will learn from the vast experience and knowledge of ...
 
Most readers of Stephen Leacock's works are familiar with his witty and humorous writings, but few may be aware that he was also a gifted teacher, political ideologue, economist and fiction writer. Though he wrote six books on Canadian history, none of them attained the status of a standard text on the subject and were regarded more as opinion pieces without much academic foundation. Yet, the Chronicles of Canada series by Stephen Leacock remains an interesting and entertaining read. In this ...
 
EVERY age, every race, has its leaders and heroes. There were over sixty distinct tribes of Indians on this continent, each of which boasted its notable men. The names and deeds of some of these men will live in American history, yet in the true sense they are unknown, because misunderstood. I should like to present some of the greatest chiefs of modern times in the light of the native character and ideals, believing that the American people will gladly do them tardy justice. (Summary from t ...
 
First published in 1894, this wonderful travelogue by a famed naturalist and conservationist still remains a book that delights and informs its readers. The Mountains of California by John Muir recounts the author's exploration of the Yosemite Valley, Mount Whitney, the famed sequoia forests and King's Canyon among other places of immense natural beauty. Written in his characteristic zestful style, with a deep understanding and respect for nature, the book is a treasure trove of geography, g ...
 
This is a picturesque and moving account of the life and work of Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton (1774-1821), the first native-born citizen of the United States to be canonized a saint by the Roman Catholic Church. This widowed mother of five established schools in New York and Maryland and was the first to found a congregation of Religious Sisters in the United States, the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph, whose motherhouse stands today in Emmitsburg, Maryland.
 
The Metro Library podcast celebrates Oklahoma arts, Oklahoma culture, Oklahoma history and the lives of influential Oklahomans today. Upcoming podcasts include a special on the BC Clark Anniversary Sale Jingle, a multi-episode segment on Oklahoma prohibition and alcohol laws, and a multi-episode segment on running for political office in Oklahoma. Future podcasts will include interviews with Oklahoma Poet Laurette Jeanetta Calhoun Mish, bestselling author Kim Ventrella, Oklahoma City Mayor D ...
 
Adobe & Teardrops highlights the best in alt-country and punk week after week. Hosted by Rachel Cholst of the long-running blog Adobe & Teardrops, the show will highlight the kind of music that gets you through the tough times and buoys you through the good ones. In music we trust. (To learn more about the podcast and read long-form reviews of the albums featured, head to www.adobeandteardrops.com)
 
Ramona, a novel written by Helen Hunt Jackson (1884), is the story of a part-Scottish and part-Native American orphan girl growing up and getting married in Southern California, suffering racial discrimination and hardship. Originally serialized in the Christian Union on a weekly basis, the novel became immensely popular. Overall, it has had more than 300 printings, been made into four film versions, and has been performed as an outdoor play annually since 1923. The impact the novel had on t ...
 
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show series
 
"Battle Bus" was a sculpture made by Sokari Douglas Camp in memory of Nigerian environmentalist Ken Saro Wiwa and eight other activists who were controversially executed in 1995. The sculpture was seized and impounded by Nigerian port authorities in 2015 when the art work was shipped to Nigeria. Sokari Douglas Camp talks to Rebecca Kesby about grow…
 
We get the backstory on idiedtrying and hear about the latest event coming to Englewood Cinema. idiedtrying. (18th Anniversary Show!!!!!!) A Live One Man Performance By J.Anthony (Tony) Goff aka idiedtrying. Performing a visceral set of music spanning the entire 18 years of idt. with video, all synced & played on the 31 foot HD movie theater screen…
 
Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area (University of Illinois Press, 2018) is a fascinating, densely researched account of dockworkers and their organized responses to seismic economic and technological changes in the shipping industry between the 1940s and 1970s. Peter Cole examines the International Longshor…
 
With the world’s attention riveted to the nuclear threat from Iran, Yaakov Katz’s new book could not be more timely. In Shadow Strike: Inside Israel’s Secret Mission to Eliminate Syrian Nuclear Power (St. Martin's Press, 2019), Jerusalem Post Editor-in-Chief Katz tells the inside story of how Israel stopped Syria from becoming a global nuclear nigh…
 
The Rhodesian Unilateral Declaration of Independence was one of the last crises of formal imperialism. British settlers in present-day Zimbabwe, then known as Rhodesia, refused to accept demands from London that they accept requirements for majority rule before they could receive independence. In 1965, they declared independence and attempted to es…
 
Nicholas Blincoe’s More Noble Than War: A Soccer History of Israel-Palestine (Bold Type Books, 2019) is a beautifully narrated and written history of a century of conflict between pre-state Jews and Palestinians and Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinians after the establishment of the state. It is a story that goes far beyond the history of the conf…
 
In Vicksburg: Grant’s Campaign that Broke the Confederacy (Simon & Schuster, 2019), Donald L. Miller explains in great detail how Grant ultimately succeeded in taking the city and turning the tide of the war in favor of the Union. Miller begins his tale with events in Cairo and leads the reader through all the important events that lead to success …
 
The co-founder of Samourai Wallet, rejoins me in this episode to talk about the current state of bitcoin privacy techniques, and some exciting updates coming soon to Samourai Wallet. We talk: Creeping KYC and has bitcoin social culture regressed? Does taint exist? Coin selection algorithms. STONEWALL, and Solomon Stowaway / PayJoin Wallet fingerpri…
 
The Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy Tuesday amid several expensive sex-abuse lawsuits. We talk with lawyer Michael Pfau, whose firm represents nearly 300 people who report being abused as Scouts. Also, a new NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll shows Bernie Sanders leading by double digits nationally, with Michael Bloomberg polling second.…
 
Michael Bloomberg has qualified to join Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren in Wednesday night's Democratic debate in Nevada. Democratic strategist Maria Cardona discusses what to expect from the candidates. And, Colorado Colorado State University Pueblo will soon offer a cannabis-focused bachelor's degree.…
 
My guest is Katherine Rowland. Tens of millions of American women are dissatisfied with their sex lives. In her provocative and meticulously researched new book, The Pleasure Gap: American Women and the Unfinished Sexual Revolution, Katherine Rowland, a public health researcher and journalist explores our culture's troubled relationship with women'…
 
In 2002, scientists in the US began performing a landmark series of experiments on Buddhist monks from around the world. The studies showed that the brains of experienced meditators alter, allowing them to focus better and manage their emotions. Alejandra Martins talks to Professor Richard Davidson of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University …
 
Eric Lomazoff has written a kind of detective novel about the national bank controversy during the early years of the new republic. Lomazoff poses, in the introduction, and at the start of each chapter, the general understanding that many scholars and citizens have about the bank controversy itself and the constitutional decision in McCulloch vs. M…
 
In Exile Within Exiles: Herbert Daniel Gay Brazilian Revolutionary (Duke University Press, 2018), James N. Green tells the story of Herbert Daniel, a significant and complex figure in Brazilian leftist revolutionary politics and social activism from the mid-1960s until his death in 1992. As a medical student, Daniel joined a revolutionary guerrilla…
 
Pilar M. Herr’s new book Contested Nation: The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in Nineteenth-Century Chile (University of New Mexico Press, 2019) places the independent Mapuche people and pro-Spanish Pincheira bandits at the heart of Chile’s nineteenth century. During the 1820s, while criollo elites struggled openly between themselves to form…
 
In The Icon and the Square: Russian Modernism and the Russo-Byzantine Revival (Penn State University Press, 2018), Maria Taroutina examines how the traditional interests of institutions such as the crown, the church, and the Imperial Academy of Arts temporarily aligned with the radical, leftist, and revolutionary avant-garde at the turn of the twen…
 
Anyone who tries to understand the history, religion, and especially the “culture” of Southeast Asia, will soon encounter the phenomenon of animism, the belief that landscapes, natural objects, trees and plants, animals, and deceased ancestors, possess spirits that influence the human world. Yet “animism” is a Western analytical category, coined du…
 
Departing from the bold and compelling claim that we cannot fully understand the histories of decolonization and the so-called “sexual revolution” apart from one another, Todd Shepard’s Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979 (University of Chicago Press, 2017) is a complex analysis of the lasting impact of the Algerian Revolution through the cultural…
 
Our guests are Alexis Agliano Sanborn and Chris Whittaker. Alexis joined us on Episode 106 in 2018 to discuss the production of her new film “Nourishing Japan”. She is the producer and director of the film and now it is finally on view. Chris is a professional composer, conductor and pianist, and he created beautiful songs for the film. Their new f…
 
Many interns are still not paid in the U.S., and students often struggle trying to balance the opportunity while also going to class, paying off student loans and working part-time jobs. We talk to Carlos Mark Vera, who is working to change experiences for interns. Also, the California attorney general is looking into an allegation that the LAPD mi…
 
We are pleased that Montgomery County Recorder, Brandon C. McClain, joins us for our latest “community conversation.” What is a Recorder? We wondered too! Brandon explains his role as Recorder, his thoughts on receiving the 2019 Herman Zerger Veteran of the Year award, and the importance of voting in the upcoming elections! (Remember – The voter re…
 
Nobel laureate Paul Krugman explains some of the most vital economic policy issues of our time. Private health insurance; accepting budget deficits – or not; putting tariffs on foreign trade. What makes economic sense and what’s fiscal myth? And he assesses some economic policies put forward in this US presidential election. Economy might decide th…
 
Why did early modern people change their religious affiliation? And how did they represent that change in writing? In this outstanding new book, Conversion Narratives in Early Modern England: Tales of Turning (Palgrave, 2018), Abigail Shinn, who teaches in the department of English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths, University of London, ope…
 
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