show episodes
 
The Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence seeks to advance a critical debate on the new political economy of Europe. We are based at Dublin's European Institute (DEI) at University College Dublin. The DEI is the oldest and largest university centre for research on European politics in the Republic of Ireland. In this podcast we interview scholars, journalists, policymakers, and activists. Our focus is on the Centre's three key research themes: economic governance, democratic legitimacy, and prote ...
 
The Audio Long Read podcast is a selection of the Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more
 
Hey there folks, Mark Edwards here. I'm a writer, a vlogger, and a full-time paramedic. Every couple of weeks I sit down with a new guest to talk about their area of expertise and use that to interrogate and learn more about the world around us. I usually approach things from a leftist/progressive angle, but my goal is to reach as many people as possible regardless of their political leanings.
 
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Gender Troubles

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Gender Troubles

Emma Austin and Eva Espenshade

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Gender Troubles is a podcast dedicated to debunking, demystifying and making accessible the world of academic feminism. Eva and Emma talk through different feminist movements and moments from a critical, leftist lens. Episodes aim to shake up the feminist canon and provide a new spin on feminist history, movements, and icons. Hosted by Emma Austin and Eva Espenshade We are a proud member of the Harbinger Media Network Support us on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/gender_troubles
 
What is modern feminism and how has the digital age changed it? In this limited-series podcast, Nora Loreto will take you through feminism: from debates to campaigns, from white feminism to co-optation, from Feminist Justin Trudeau to feminist civil disobedience, and everything in between. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
The CBRL inspires and supports the highest quality research in the humanities and social sciences in the countries of the Levant. Through its events and outreach activities, CBRL encourages the exchange and dissemination of knowledge and ideas for the benefit of all. CBRL is a non-profit organisation. Comments and queries are welcome to: cbrldevelopment@thebritishacademy.ac.uk.
 
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EQUALS

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EQUALS

The Inequality Podcast

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A PODCAST ABOUT HOPE IN THE FIGHT AGAINST INEQUALITY. We meet activists, politicians and thinkers from all walks of life to share stories about how inequality is being fought around the world. Brought to you by Liz, Max, Nabil and Nadia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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System of Systems

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System of Systems

Adam Lehrer and Will Samson

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"You are an old man who thinks in terms of nations and peoples. There are no nations. There are no peoples. There are no Russians. There are no Arabs. There are no Third Worlds. There is no West. There is only one holistic system of systems, one vast and immane, interwoven, interacting, multivariate, multinational dominion of dollars. Petrodollars, electro- dollars, multi-dollars, Reichsmarks, rins, rubles, pounds, and shekels. It is the international system of currency which determines the ...
 
Money on the Left is a monthly, interdisciplinary podcast that reclaims money’s public powers for intersectional politics. Hosting critical conversations with leading historians, theorists, organizers, and activists, the show draws upon Modern Monetary Theory and constitutional approaches to money to advance new forms of left critique and practice. Money on the Left is the official podcast of the Modern Money Network’s Humanities Division. It is hosted by William Saas, Maxximilian Seijo and ...
 
In a six-part podcast miniseries, economist James Meadway and journalist Kirsty Styles delve into our economic system, the difference between capitalism and neoliberalism, and how neoliberalism came to dominate modern day economics. From the team behind the Weekly Economics Podcast. "Lively and engaging… To me, it sounded like they were talking a lot of sense" - The Observer Produced by James Shield. Programme editor for NEF: Huw Jordan. Brought to you by the New Economics Foundation – the i ...
 
Shelf Love explores fictional stories of romantic love across media, time, and cultures. For the curious and open-minded who joyfully question as they consume pop culture. What's love got to do with it? Quite a bit! From the page to the stage, on the screen or in the wrestling ring: Shelf Love invites experts to share their knowledge and love for diverse genres and how they help us explore romantic love, including romance novels, comic books, soap operas, romantic comedies, video games, oral ...
 
A podcast about Emily Dickinson, but now she f*cks. Hello all, we're Kyle and Benjamin. We love Emily Dickinson and are really excited to watch the new Apple TV+ show 'Dickinson,' created by Alena Smith and starring Hailee Steinfeld, Ella Hunt, Jane Krakowski, and Toby Huss. Join us as we discuss the show episode by episode, while also reflecting on the grim realities of life in 19th century New England with "charm" and "wit". Each episode also features a discussion of the OG Emily Dickinson ...
 
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Pundits Pub

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Pundits Pub

Pundits Pub with Stephen Love

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Pundits Pub is "America's Public House" where YOU become the pundit. We'll discuss the major political, social and cultural issues facing the American People today. Pundits Pub is a feast for the mind, a special place to relax with a cocktail, or your favorite soft drink, and maybe have a few laughs while we discuss some pretty darn important issues. Bracing for the intellect, invigorating your artistic soul, Pundits Pub is your alternative multi-media destination.
 
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Uncommon Decency

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Uncommon Decency

Jorge González-Gallarza & François Valentin

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Your intellectual euro-trip in podcast form, with co-hosts Jorge González-Gallarza and François Valentin. Through interviews and analysis, Uncommon Decency will seek to engage with the freshest thinking on European issues. Get in touch at @UnDecencyPod or undecencypod@gmail.com, and consider supporting the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/undecencypod.
 
An interview series on the unholy mess of crypto User Experience and what can be done about it, NOW. Wanna support the Mess Adoption podcast? Gitcoin Grant: https://gitcoin.co/grants/644/mess-adoption?tab=description Join the Community here: https://t.me/messadoption Donate Crypto to: MessAdoption.eth
 
Michael C. Dawson, founder and former Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago, is the host of this Race and Capitalism Project-initiated podcast series, New Dawn. He invites guests to discuss their research related to race and capitalism. Many episodes have generously been supported by Scholarly Borderlands and Social Science Research Council.
 
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show series
 
This Money on the Left/Superstructure teaser previews both our tenth and eleventh premium releases from Scott Ferguson's "Neoliberal Blockbuster" course for Patreon subscribers. For access to the full lecture, subscribe to our Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/MoLsuperstructure. If you are interested in premium offerings but presently unable to…
 
One of the central questions of economics is "Why are some countries rich and some countries poor? And how did rich countries become rich in the first place?" Economic historian Joel Mokyr joins the podcast to discuss these questions and more. Why did the Industrial Revolution happen in England, and not elsewhere? How did political fragmentation le…
 
Since the turn of the millennium, protests, meetings, schoolrooms, reading groups and many other social forms have been proposed as artworks or, more ambiguously, as interventions that are somewhere between art and politics. Kim Charnley's Sociopolitical Aesthetics: Art, Crisis and Neoliberalism (Bloomsbury, 2021) traces key currents of theory and …
 
Hello fellow Dickheads! Join Ben and Kyle for a discussion about shame versus guilt, what it means to be alive during times of immense upheaval and whether Emily Dickinson would make a good sitcom husband. We also discuss using the time and abilities we have available to us by way of both Emily and John Milton. And finally, Kyle delivers on his pro…
 
When we think of Palestine we think of the struggle for liberation against occupation, settler colonialism, and brutal military oppression. What often gets left out is how this fits into neoliberal capitalism. Adopting private development and neoliberalization under Israeli occupation not only failed to promote Palestinian sovereignty but instead i…
 
Grace speaks to Neil Vallelly, author of Futilitarianism: Neoliberalism and the Production of Uselessness. They discuss the role of utilitarian thinking in the development of capitalism, how utilitarianism has collapsed into "futilitarianism," and the impact this pervasive sense of futility is having on our sense of individual and collective wellbe…
 
In the summer of 1941, as Italy warred its way to a series of territorial annexations in east Africa and the Mediterranean, a little-known anti-fascist activist by the name of Altiero Spinelli languished in prison, his restless mind fantasizing about Europe’s postbellum future. Named the Ventotene Manifesto after the island where Spinelli was jaile…
 
Near Tijuana, Baja California, the autonomous community of Maclovio Rojas demonstrates what is possible for urban place-based political movements. More than a community, Maclovio Rojas is a women-led social movement that works for economic and political autonomy to address issues of health, education, housing, nutrition, and security. Border Women …
 
As people reach for social justice and better lives, they create public goods--free education, public health, open parks, clean water, and many others--that must be kept out of the market. When private interests take over, they strip public goods of their power to lift people up, creating instead a tool to diminish democracy, further inequality, an…
 
The contemporary opioid crisis is widely seen as new and unprecedented. Not so. It is merely the latest in a long series of drug crises stretching back over a century. In White Market Drugs: Big Pharma and the Hidden History of Addiction in America (U Chicago Press, 2020), David Herzberg explores these crises and the drugs that fueled them, from Ba…
 
“The good life” and “the American Dream “remain powerful animating principles in popular culture, politics, and also our individual psyches. I spoke with Professor Dora Zhang at the University of California at Berkeley who teaches a course on “the good life,” using mostly literary rather than philosophical texts. From Sophokles’s Antigone (441 B.C.…
 
In this episode, I interview Shaoling Ma, professor of Humanities (Literature) at Yale-NUS about her new book, The Stone and the Wireless: Mediating China, 1861-1906 (Duke UP, 2021). In this fascinating book, Ma grapples with theoretical and historical questions of media and mediation in the late Qing. Calling on a diverse set of sources, including…
 
Figures of the Future: Latino Civil Rights and the Politics of Demographic Change (Princeton UP, 2021) examines the “contemporary population politics of national Latino civil rights advocacy.” The book challenges readers to generally understand democratic projections as problematic, political, and manufactured -- and specifically consider the case …
 
The creation of the modern, interconnected world is generally credited to European pioneers. But Africa was the wellspring for almost everything they achieved – and African lives were the terrible cost. By Howard W French. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpodBy The Guardian
 
01 December 2021This lecture revisits the notion of “unfree labour” through the study of refugee workers in Middle Eastern agriculture. It presents findings from the Refugee Labour under Lockdown project, drawing on interviews with 80 Syrian agricultural workers, 20 intermediaries, and 20 employers in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Syria. The Interna…
 
The U.S. government has tried to destabilize the tiny island nation of Cuba for 60 years all as punishment for Cuba daring to have a revolution and forge a path independent of U.S. capitalism. Yet Cuba has survived, and even thrived, most recently developing its own highly effective COVID vaccine while dispatching doctors around the world. How did …
 
In Economic Thought in Modern China: Market and Consumption, c.1500–1937 (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Margherita Zanasi argues that basic notions of a free market economy emerged in China a century and half earlier than in Europe. In response to the commercial revolutions of the late 1500s, Chinese intellectuals and officials called for the …
 
In Dissident Histories in the Soviet Union: From De-Stalinization to Perestroika (Bloomsbury,, 2019), Barbara Martin traces the careers of four prominent figures: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Roy Medvedev, Aleksandr Nekrich and Anton Antonov-Ovseenko. Based on extensive archival research into these four authors, Martin provides a new account of dissiden…
 
In Hindutva as Political Monotheism (Duke University Press, 2020), Professor Anustup Basu provides a genealogical study of Hindutva. The interview is a discussion upon the connection drawn by the author between the Hindu nationalism and Carl Schmitt’s idea of political theology to portray the orientalist and Eurocentric nature of the Hindutva ideol…
 
Jeffrey Bachman's edited volume Cultural Genocide: Law, Politics, and Global Manifestations (Routledge, 2019) asks where the boundaries between genocide and other kinds of mass atrocity violence rest and what the stakes are in locating them here rather than there. Bachman, Senior Professorial Lecturer at the American University and a co-host of thi…
 
Suspect Communities: Anti-Muslim Racism and the Domestic War on Terror (University of Minnesota Press, 2019) is a powerful reassessment of the U.S. government’s “countering violent extremism” (CVE) program that has arisen in major cities across the United States since 2011. Drawing on an interpretive qualitative study, Nicole Nguyen, Associate Prof…
 
An intrepid expert with dozens of books to his name, Stéphane Bourgoin was a bestselling author, famous in France for having interviewed more than 70 notorious murderers. Then an anonymous collective began to investigate his past. By Scott Sayare.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod…
 
In this new episode, Morbid Books editor and writer Lev Parker joins the show for the second time, this time bringing along none other than the divine philosopher and poet Nina Power, who of course just wrote a beautiful afterword for Adam's new book 'Communions'. A wide variety of topics are addressed, from the middle class tendency towards being …
 
Political Scientists Amy Fried (University of Maine) and Douglas B. Harris (Loyola University Maryland) have a new book, At War with Government: How Conservatives Weaponized Distrust from Goldwater to Trump (Columbia UP, 2021), that looks at the question of distrust within American politics and how that distrust has moved from healthy skepticism to…
 
The Enlightenment is often either praised as the wellspring of modern egalitarianism or condemned as the cradle of scientific racism. How should we make sense of this paradox? The Color of Equality: Race and Common Humanity in Enlightenment Thought (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021) is the first book to investigate both the inclusive language of common h…
 
ND stages a trialogue this week with MacArthur "Genius" Cristina Rivera Garza and Notre Dame critics Kate Marshall and Dominique Vargas. Professor Rivera Garza recalls roadtripping through Mexico in a bochito (a Volkswagen). For her, such drives became the mother of literary invention: there was no car radio and when family conversations died down,…
 
Amid a string of fall 2021 news reports about past-due exonerations and (white) self-defense that document the limits of racial justice within the U.S. legal system, Pain and Shock in America: Politics, Advocacy, and the Controversial Treatment of People with Disabilities (Brandeis University Press, 2021) becomes an even more relevant and timely bo…
 
In this interview, I speak with Till F. Paasche and James D. Sidaway about their new book, Transecting Securityscapes: Dispatches from Cambodia, Iraq, and Mozambique (University of Georgia Press, 2021). In addition to the book's methodological and theoretical contributions, we also discussed the extensive field research and important personal exper…
 
“Supply and demand.” “It’s just Econ 101.” “Most economists agree...” “There’s always trade offs.” Over and over, media and policymakers spew the same tired recitations meant to convey the seemingly natural, immutable laws of economics. "The economy," we’re told, is thriving when business owners and job creators are making record profits, and faili…
 
In the memorable Pixar comedy Monster Inc, a parallel universe inhabited by monsters has managed to harness the power of sound—the screams of terrified children, to be precise. For better or worse, we haven’t been able to replicate this in our neck of the galactic woods, but as global warming increasingly starts to rear its ugly head, the need for …
 
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