show episodes
 
Helen Zaltzman and Olly Mann of Answer Me This!, Pete Donaldson of The Football Ramble and Chris Skinner, producer of The Bugle, look back over the first decade of podcasting. They share their experiences, give advice on getting started and answer the most important question of all — can you make a living from podcasts? Hosted at the Apple Store, Regent Street in London.
 
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show series
 
Are we closer to understanding sudden infant death syndrome? Has a Trump-appointed judge given a glimmer of hope to trans Americans? And are too many British police officers about to get Tasers? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Tom Chivers, Kate Samuelson and Emma Smith…
 
California had virtually no reputation as an international wine-growing region until 24th May, 1976 - when 11 wine experts gathered at a Parisian hotel and decided, in a blind taste-test, that wines from Napa Valley were indeed more quaffable than France’s most famous varieties: a decision that shook up the world of wine, and became known as ‘The J…
 
Throwing people out of windows might seem a peculiar way to protest, but it’s happened so often in history, it’s got a special name: defenestration. And perhaps the most significant of all - because it brought about the Thirty Years War - was the assault on three Habsburg officials by Bohemian malcontents in Prague on 23rd May, 1618. The dispute ha…
 
Motorcycling daredevil Evel Knievel had been keen on jumping the Grand Canyon since 1968, but never staged an actual attempt. On May 20th, 1999, however, his son Robbie performed the feat on live television - and lived to tell the tale. “I’m wiped out in the head a little”, he said, before being examined by paramedics, who applied a neck brace and …
 
Over 100 million Rubik’s Cubes were sold in just a few short years at the onset of the 1980s - a phenomenon kickstarted on 19th May, 1974, when Hungarian Professor of Architecture Ernő Rubik supposedly created the prototype for his ‘Magic Cube’. It took him a month to solve himself - a feat which seems unimpressive in a world where the current reco…
 
Atheist, homosexual, heretic… the slurs levelled at popular playwright Christopher Marlowe came thick and fast after he was arrested on 18th May, 1593. Just twelve days later, he was murdered in a London tavern. His former roomate, Thomas Kyd, pointed the finger at Marlowe after being tortured following the discovery of a ‘treasonous’ pamphlet in h…
 
n this special episode Matt Deegan presents highlights from the annual radio festival in Malmo, chatting to a stellar line-up of audio guests. Helen Thomas (Director BBC Radio 2) and Stephanie Hirst (Presenter HITS Radio) share their conference takeaways - what secrets go into great radio? And how will the industry compete with TikTok and Youtube w…
 
The Buttonwood Agreement, as it came to be known, effectively launched the New York Stock Exchange. Signed by 24 stockbrokers on 17th May, 1792, it promised two things - that they would trade exclusively and directly with each other, and that they wouldn’t undercut each other’s commission. But they had no permanent building, and only a tiny number …
 
The future Queen of France was accompanied by 57 carriages, 117 footmen and 376 horses on her journey from Austria to Versailles - but remarkably took only three hours to do her hair and makeup when she tied the knot with Louis-Auguste on 16th May, 1770. Only 15 at the time, Louis was perceived - even by his closest friends and family - to be timid…
 
Disney+ has a stellar March Quarter while Netflix announces an ad-tier. Matt Deegan is joined by business journalist and media commentator Kate Bulkley and Heat Magazine Entertainment Director Boyd Hilton to explain where the streaming wars are headed next. Also on the programme: we hear from audio producer Arlie Adlington about the practical steps…
 
When three young kids in Fatima, Portugal reported that the Virgin Mary had appeared to them on 13th May, 1917, the incident sparked hysteria across their rural, intensely Catholic community. The ‘three secrets’ supposedly revealed that day - and the much-attended ‘Miracle of the Sun’ event prophesied that Autumn - gave a long-lasting boost to Fati…
 
Ridley Scott’s ‘Gladiator’ opened in the UK on 12th May, 2000 - and was widely credited with resurrecting the ‘swords-and-sandals’ genre, sparking an interest in Roman history, and achieving that rare combination of critical praise and humongous box office success. But the epic production was problematic - not least because supporting star Ollie Re…
 
IBM's Deep Blue conquered Russian chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov on 11th May, 1997 - in a man v machine clash Newsweek brazenly baptised ‘The Brain’s Last Stand’. Despite the incredible achievement of having created a program able to calculate 200 billion positions in three minutes, the IBM engineers were advised by their PR team not to look too …
 
Pippa Till gave up her job as a TV edit assistant to follow her dream of selling food at festivals, in her very own food truck. But she had no food, no truck - and no business plan. Armed with nothing more than derring-do spirit, a pile of debt and a sackful of scones, Pippa spent the next few years attempting to master her profit margin, ace her m…
 
Michelangelo was a sculptor, not a painter, when on 10th May, 1508, he embarked upon the biggest gig of his career: painting the roof of the Sistine chapel in the Vatican. Outwardly reluctant, and doubtful he could complete the project, he nonetheless took the opportunity to suggest that rather than portraying the twelve apostles requested by the P…
 
Fugitive Thomas Blood sneaked his way into the Tower of London’s jewel room on 9th May, 1671 - bludgeoning the 77 year-old Keeper of the Jewels, Talbot Edwards, in the process. Disguised as a parson, the Irish adventurer had cat-fished Edwards in an audacious and complex heist that involved multiple pairs of white gloves, a fake nephew and stuffing…
 
Channel 4 offers to sell its London HQ and move North in a bid to save itself from privatisation- will an alternative plan win over the government? Media news and analysis, this week with Trevor Dann and Scott Bryan. Also on the programme: we look through the winners and losers at the ARIAs, the BBC sets out a restructure of the senior commissionin…
 
Should people who work from home earn 20% less? Is Taiwan at risk of a Chinese invasion? And what does the failure of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s latest production tell us about post-Covid theatre? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Leaf Arbuthnot, Joe Evans and Julia O’Driscoll…
 
The lifts weren’t operational, so there weren’t any visitors, but the commemorative coins had already been minted - so it was 6th May, 1889 that went down in history as the official opening of the Eiffel Tower, at that time the world’s tallest man-made structure. Erected for the World’s Fair to commemorate 100 years since the French Revolution, it …
 
Chanel No 5, the legendary perfume still said to shift one bottle every thirty seconds, was first released in Paris on 5th May, 1921. Created by Ernest Beaux, its innovative mixture of jasmine, sandalwood, orange blossom and aldehydes gave it a freshness and fizz that turned heads - and its simple, masculine bottle bucked the trend for ornate desig…
 
As British literacy rates surged to a new high of 97%, the time was right to launch a simpler, shorter, more readable newspaper - and Alfred Harmsworth’s Daily Mail caught the zeitgeist when it hit the news-stands (at the eye-catching price of just half a penny) on 4th May, 1896. The new paper attracted half a million daily readers by the end of th…
 
Martin Shkreli, ‘the most hated man in America’, purchased the one extant copy of the Wu-Tang Clan’s concept album ‘Once Upon A Time In Shaolin’ for $2 million on 3rd May, 2015. In seeking to sell their record in an auction, the hip-hop collective had been inspired by the concept of wealthy patrons funding Renaissance artists - but hadn’t counted o…
 
The Mail On Sunday doubles down on their Angela Rayner/Basic Instinct story, sparking widespread condemnation. How has this incident gone down in the lobby pool that attends Westminster every week? Former political correspondent Jim Waterson tells us about life as a lobby hack. A second sexism story has sparked conversations in the industry, as ex-…
 
Where are meatballs from, and why does it matter? Social media users frenziedly grappled with these very questions on 29th April, 2018, when Sweden’s official Twitter account proclaimed: “Swedish meatballs are actually based on a recipe King Charles XII brought home from Turkey in the early 18th century. Let's stick to the facts!” Does this tale ab…
 
What does an election in Slovenia tell us about populism in Europe? Why is the government appointing a HRT tsar? And is it too late to save the nation's favourite game? The Week and Olly Mann delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Kari Wilkin, Arion McNicoll and Emma Smith.…
 
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