show episodes
 
At Popular Science, we report and write dozens of science and tech stories every week. And while a lot of the fun facts we stumble across make it into our articles, there are lots of other weird facts that we just keep around the office. So we figured, why not share those with you? Welcome to The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/support
 
Open science concepts explained as stories in 10 minutes or less, hosted by Heidi Seibold. We'd love to hear your story! If you think you might have a story to tell, write an e-mail to opensciencestories@gmail.com This podcast is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 RSS feed: https://anchor.fm/s/46287364/podcast/rss Contact: opensciencestories@gmail.com
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
An audio podcast for Otolaryngology Ear Nose and Throat, Head and Neck Surgery. This podcast is designed as an learning tool. A direct way to update clinicians on all things ENT. We aren't the experts, we just interview them. #FOAMed Find us on Twitter- @ENTexpertopin and Facebook- ENT Expert Opinion. Join our conversation- it's fun. Feedback encouraged. www.entexpertopinion.com
 
In this podcast series, editors-in-chief from the JACC family of specialty journals provide highlights and summarize key findings for select issues. Published by the American College of Cardiology, the JACC Journals publish peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of cardiovascular disease, including original clinical studies, translational investigations with clear clinical relevance, state-of-the art papers, and review articles. They are top ranked for impact factor and their manuscripts are ...
 
David Yakobovitch explores AI for consumers through fireside conversations with industry thought leaders on HumAIn. From Chief Data Scientists and AI Advisors, to Leaders who advance AI for All, the HumAIn Podcast is the channel to release new AI products, to learn about industry trends, and to bridge the gap between humans and machines in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
 
A podcast for the bold and curious to help you navigate our world's accelerating weirdness — about science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and the stories we regard as real, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for a weirding present and proliferating futures, art and creativity as service and as inquiry. Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield eve ...
 
Are you a researcher or data scientist / analyst / ninja? Do you want to learn Bayesian inference, stay up to date or simply want to understand what Bayesian inference is? Then this podcast is for you! You'll hear from researchers and practitioners of all fields about how they use Bayesian statistics, and how in turn YOU can apply these methods in your modeling workflow. When I started learning Bayesian methods, I really wished there were a podcast out there that could introduce me to the me ...
 
Ginger Locke is a paramedic and professor of EMS students in the US. She has long been fascinated with the inner-workings of medics' minds. In this podcast, she interviews medics face-to-face, in long, intimate format. She thoughtfully asks her guests to open up about their mindset, routines, mistakes, thought-processes, and lessons hard-learned. This is her creative outlet (art). She is on twitter @gingerlockeatx and show notes from each episode can be found at medicmindset.com.
 
We believe in the educational merits of Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM), which includes podcasts, blogs, articles on PubMed Central, conferences streamed for free and more. As a result, we would like to encourage others to move beyond quoting podcasts and into the realm of tying “cutting edge” FOAM to the core content. We’ll provide some review and references for listeners to go read. Why, indeed, should we FOAM it alone when FOAM can inspire us to go, read, think, and be excellent?
 
Produced in conjunction with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and their consumer site, HealthyChildren.org, Healthy Children is hosted by our favorite Mom: Melanie Cole, MS. Join Melanie as she interviews expert pediatricians and discusses all aspects of your children’s health and well-being. From infants to teens, potty training to bullying, to prom safety – this is your ultimate audio parenting guide available On Demand 24/7!
 
A weekly Python podcast hosted by Christopher Bailey with interviews, coding tips, and conversation with guests from the Python community. The show covers a wide range of topics including Python programming best practices, career tips, and related software development topics. Join us every Friday morning to hear what's new in the world of Python programming and become a more effective Pythonista.
 
Stay current with the latest studies in radiation oncology with free podcasts from the official journals of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). The International Journal of Radiation Oncology-Biology-Physics (the Red Journal) publishes the latest clinical research related to radiation oncology, radiation biology, medical physics, education, and health policy. The overarching mission of Practical Radiation Oncology is to improve the quality of radiation oncology practice thro ...
 
In this series of podcasts we consider the impact of opening up science: allowing both the research community and the public to freely access the results of scientific work. Individuals can be fully informed about medical or environmental research, students worldwide can get access to the latest work, and software agents can roam the vast scientific knowledge base seeking patterns and correlations that no human has observed. Ultimately, it may profoundly change the way science is done. The r ...
 
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show series
 
Is psychology research in a crisis or a renaissance? Over the past decade, scientists have realized that many published research results, including some classic findings in psychology, don’t always hold up to repeat trials. Brian Nosek, PhD, of the Center for Open Science, discusses how psychologists are leading a movement to address that problem, …
 
This Ideas Roadshow Collection includes five Ideas Roadshow books that have been developed from filmed wide-ranging conversations with the following leading neuroscientists: Lisa Feldman Barrett (Northeastern University), Jennifer Groh (Duke University), Kalanit Grill-Spector (Stanford University), John Duncan (Cambridge University) and Miguel Nico…
 
Yoel and Alexa discuss progress in open science over the past 10 years. Is the scientific reform glass half-full or half-empty? Where have we made progress, and what still needs work? We use two papers describing "Scientific Utopia" by Nosek and colleagues (written nearly 10 years ago!) in order to evaluate our progress. Also, the true story of how…
 
In today’s episode Lisa Barros de Andarde e Sousa discusses her difficulties in gaining new scientific insights by building on previous research results and how a change in the culture of criticism in science can help to accelerate scientific progress. Lisa obtained her PhD in Bioinformatics from the Free University of Berlin as part of the Interna…
 
"Code often isn't your project, the research question is your project." Research software is a major component of modern science, but not everyone is a specialist in this regard. Barbara Vreede and Lieke de Boer from the Netherlands eScience center talk about the increasing importance of version control and the role of the research software enginee…
 
How do various CRISPR systems interact with the body in beneficial ways? Using different techniques, specific immunity systems may be targeted and cleaved. Listen up to learn: How molecules are targeted to be cleaved Why RNA helps target specific systems Where the RNA fuses onto the DNA Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics …
 
The popularity of Python is continuing to grow Developers across the globe are embracing the language. How is Python being used in all of these different countries? How does an organization like the Python Software Foundation (PSF) work toward the goals in its mission statement for supporting and growing this international community? This week on t…
 
In Campus Carry: Confronting a Loaded Issue in Higher Education (Harvard Education Press, 2020), editors Patricia Somers and Matt Valentine lead an examination of the unintended consequences of campus gun policy and showcase voices from the college community who are grappling with the questions, issues, and consequences that have emerged at their r…
 
Victoria Canning and Steve Tombs' book From Social Harm to Zemiology: A Critical Introduction (Routledge, 2021) outlines key developments in understanding social harm by setting out its historical foundations and the discussions which have proliferated since. It examines various attempts to conceptualise social harm and highlights key sites of cont…
 
In this podcast Jennifer and Daniel Cobaugh will discuss Jennifer’s life journey as a transgender woman. The information presented during the podcast reflects solely the opinions of the presenter. The information and materials are not, and are not intended as, a comprehensive source of drug information on this topic. The contents of the podcast hav…
 
The aftermath can be just as challenging and uncomfortable—the aftermath of major surgery, that is. Tune in to learn about a revolutionary product that’s changing the post-op lives of thousands. You’ll learn: The specifics behind the robe design that enables better movement, greater comfort, and erases the risk of skin irritation from other methods…
 
Today I talked to Jessica Helfand about her new book Face: A Visual Odyssey (MIT Press, 2019) Helfand is a designer, artist, and author. She’s taught at Yale University for more than 20 years, cofounded Design Observer, and has had additional roles at a variety of institutions ranging from the American Academy in Rome to the California Institute of…
 
This event was a book launch for 'Civilization and the Making of the State in Lebanon and Syria' by Dr. Andrew Delatolla.The book argues that the modern state, from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period, has consistently been used as a means to measure civilizational engagement and attainment. This volume historicizes this dynamic, exam…
 
Join us for a conversation with the research grant teams from the ASHP Foundation New Practitioner Pharmacists Leadership Grant. Burnout syndrome and depression can have a detrimental impact on pharmacists. The project studied the relationship between grit and burnout in hospital pharmacists. It also included an assessment of depression. Topics dis…
 
How can historically misunderstood retinal neurodegenerative diseases be researched and treated? New discoveries may lead to continuing advancements in treatment for previously thought to be untreatable ailments. Listen in to learn: How treatment is targeted at specific cells How functions in the eye can be swapped between parts How the optogenetic…
 
It is almost twenty years since contemporary art took a ‘participation turn’. Now, just about every museum or theatre company has a participation or engagement department. It is nothing short of orthodoxy that one of art’s core roles is to reach out to audiences beyond art institutions - and paradoxically it is often art institutions that mandate t…
 
Whether referring to a place, a nonhuman animal or plant, or a state of mind, wild indicates autonomy and agency, a unique expression of life. Yet two contrasting ideas about wild nature permeate contemporary discussions: either that nature is most wild in the absence of a defiling human presence, or that nature is completely humanized and nothing …
 
How can new cancer therapies and treatments emerge along with the understanding of cancer cell's behavior? By learning how cells communicate and proliferate, researchers may be able to find new solutions. Press play to learn: The point at which a group of cells becomes cancerous When treatments can be too aggressive How the behavior of cancer cells…
 
This podcast will focus on personal financial literacy topics such as creating a financial plan, understanding retirement vehicles and identifying resources for continued self-education. This episode is the first release of a three-part series. The information presented during the podcast reflects solely the opinions of the presenter. The informati…
 
Why did hundreds of thousands of Thai people rise up in opposition to elected governments in 2006, 2008 and 2013-14? What were the ideological underpinnings of the yellow shirt movement? How did the original People’s Alliance for Democracy differ from the later People’s Democratic Reform Committee? Were the yellow shirts simply trying to provoke mi…
 
We've heard about it every summer for years, but somehow it still happens, kids dying in hot cars. We've heard about it every summer for years, but somehow it still happens, kids dying in hot cars. On average 40 kids die in hot cars every year, with most incidents happening towards the end of a typical work week. Dr. Benjamin Hoffman is a pediatric…
 
Between the decriminalization of contraception in 1969 and the introduction of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, a landmark decade in the struggle for women's rights, public discourse about birth control and family planning was transformed. At the same time, a transnational conversation about the "population bomb" that threatened global f…
 
Javier Guerrero's "Narcosubmarines: Outlaw Innovation and Maritime Interdiction in the War on Drugs" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) is about the encounters of Colombian drug smugglers and the Colombian Navy, both in the open seas and along coastlines. Guerrero specifically examines the technologies involved in the War on Drugs, such as the narcosubmari…
 
Any system in which politicians represent geographical districts with boundaries chosen by the politicians themselves is vulnerable to gerrymandering: carving up districts to increase the amount of seats that a given party is expected to win. But even fairly-drawn boundaries can end up quite complex, so how do we know that a given map is unfairly s…
 
Many of us will take a vaccine without thinking twice about it. But how are they developed, how do they even work, and how are they tested for safety? Press play to learn: What happens when proteins and aluminum-containing adjuvants are combined in the development of vaccines Why most vaccines are injected rather than inhaled or consumed orally, an…
 
This podcast explores how the Advocacy and PAC Advisory Committee pushed for advocacy as a professional responsibility policy statement and why it is important for pharmacists to advocate for their profession. Take action on the Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act by telling your members of Congress to co-sponsor the provider s…
 
A path-breaking journey into the brain, showing how perception, thought, and action are products of maps etched into your gray matter—and how technology can use them to read your mind. Your brain is a collection of maps. That is no metaphor: scrawled across your brain’s surfaces are actual maps of the sights, sounds, and actions that hold the key t…
 
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